Former politician rides Bluff electric bike during fundraiser

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Former MP Nuk Korako with his wife Chris in Lochiel on Sunday as he continued his fundraising bike ride from Lyttelton Harbor to Bluff.  He will finish the race on Monday.

Jamie Searle / Stuff

Former MP Nuk Korako with his wife Chris in Lochiel on Sunday as he continued his fundraising bike ride from Lyttelton Harbor to Bluff. He will finish the race on Monday.

Former politician Nuk Korako is 16 miles away from completing a fundraising bike ride from Lyttelton Harbor to Bluff.

He rode his e-bike to Invercargill on Sunday afternoon and will be heading to Bluff on Monday morning. He is happy to fundraise for Renee Veal, of Rāpaki, Lyttelton. She needs $ 90,000 for a complete jaw reconstruction and jaw joint replacement surgery. His medical condition is hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a terminal disease of the jaw joint that causes considerable pain.

Veal, 26, has difficulty sleeping and eating, and it is sometimes difficult for him to speak. She takes strong pain relievers.

“Renee is from the ancestral Ngāi Tahu village on Lyttelton Harbor where I am from,” Korako said.

“We’re related, she’s like a niece.”

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Korako left Lyttelton Harbor on October 9 with his wife Chris at the wheel of the assistance car. They traveled through the middle of the South Island to Queenstown and Invercargill.

He said nearly $ 30,000 had been raised, but more fundraising events were planned.

“The people were fantastic [with their generosity]. “

Korako had good weather heading to Invercargill on Sunday, but encountered rain, snow and sleet the days before. During the trip, he was attacked by a magpie.

“Magpies are friendlier in the south of the country … they fly and don’t attack.”


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