Chicago politician ‘pays off the police’ is protected by cops in shooting and is accused of covering up the fact

A prominent Chicago Democrat who has spoken out against ‘institutional racism’ in policing and worked to embezzle money from law enforcement has claimed she was the victim of a carjacking and of a shooting involving his security detail late last month – an incident that just became public on Wednesday.

Two men allegedly attempted to hijack a member of Cook County Council Speaker Toni Preckwinkle’s security detail outside his Hyde Park home on September 27, according to ABC7 Chicago. On Wednesday afternoon, Preckwinkle brought up the subject for the first time, despite not being injured in the encounter. Republican Cook County Commissioner Sean Morrison told Fox News that commissioners regularly receive alerts for major and minor crime and violence in the area, but this incident has been kept secret. He suggested Preckwinkle may have covered up the incident. He also has

The incident reportedly happened in September, but was not made public until Wednesday, October 6. Two suspects allegedly tried to hijack Preckwinkle’s security car outside his home in Hyde Park on September 27.

Preckwinkle was uninjured and was not in the vehicle when it happened, but the incident shook neighbors. Preckwinkle first addressed the situation nearly a week after it happened.

He suggested Preckwinkle may have covered up the incident. He also suggested it was hypocritical of Preckwinkle to criticize the police while maintaining his own security details. During a budget briefing on October 7, Preckwinkle said

Republican Cook County Commissioner Sean Morrison told Fox News that commissioners regularly receive alerts for major and minor crime and violence in the area, but that incident was kept under wraps.

In a forthcoming study, Rob Gillezeau, a professor and researcher, has concluded that from the 1950s to the 1980s, the ability of the police to bargain collectively led to a substantial increase in police killings of civilians, with a greater impact important on people of color. “With the caveat that this is very early work,” Gillezeau wrote on Twitter on May 30, “it appears collective bargaining rights are being used to protect officers’ ability to discriminate in the disproportionate use of force against the non-white population.”

Other studies have found that many existing mechanisms for disciplining the police are ineffective. WBEZ, a Chicago radio station, found that between 2007 and 2015, the Chicago Independent Police Review Authority investigated four hundred police shootings and found officers justified in all but two incidents. . Since 2012, when Minneapolis replaced its civilian review board with a police conduct review office, the public has filed more than 2,600 conduct complaints, but only 12 have resulted in a police officer being disciplined. Most severe penalty: a suspension of forty hours. When the St. Paul Pioneer Press reviewed appeals involving dismissals from 2014 to 2019, it found that arbitrators ruled in favor of fired police and corrections officers and ordered that they be reinstated forty-six percent of the time. (Non-law enforcement workers have been reinstated at a similar rate.) For those demanding more accountability, a major hurdle is that disciplinary action is often overturned if an arbitrator finds that the sanction imposed by the department is more severe than it was in a similar case. , previous case – it does not matter if the punishment in the previous case seemed much too lenient.

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  • Chicago politician ‘pays off the police’ is protected by cops in shooting and is accused of covering up the fact
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