Election Candidates – Shaughnessy For Congress http://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 23:59:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4.png Election Candidates – Shaughnessy For Congress http://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ 32 32 Holyoke to cut mayors to two on Tuesday https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/holyoke-to-cut-mayors-to-two-on-tuesday/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/holyoke-to-cut-mayors-to-two-on-tuesday/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 21:52:39 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/holyoke-to-cut-mayors-to-two-on-tuesday/ HOLYOKE – Election season has arrived in Holyoke and voters will select their favorite mayoral candidates on Tuesday in a preliminary seven-a-side race that will decide which two go to the November general election. Early voting is already underway at City Hall ahead of the September 21 preliminary elections. The race will narrow the field […]]]>

HOLYOKE – Election season has arrived in Holyoke and voters will select their favorite mayoral candidates on Tuesday in a preliminary seven-a-side race that will decide which two go to the November general election.

Early voting is already underway at City Hall ahead of the September 21 preliminary elections. The race will narrow the field to two candidates, who will compete on Nov. 2 to be sworn in immediately as successor to Alex Morse, who spent nine years as mayor before leaving in March to become general manager of Provincetown.

For many in Holyoke, change is in the air. This is how Carmen Ocasio, president of the South Holyoke Neighborhood Association, feels. She said the election is important to her and everyone in the city.

“We have to have change here at Holyoke and not just have someone there for a title,” Ocasio said. “Someone who’s really going to get the job done and really clean up Holyoke.” You have to start by solving the problems that have been constant for so many years and are getting worse, and try to make them better. “

The seven candidates who made it to the ballot for Tuesday’s preliminary municipal election are: academic and activist Gloria Caballero Roca; Joshua Garcia, City Manager of Blandford; writer William Glidden, who was an assistant to the walrus; businessman Christopher Kosinski; member of the Devin Sheehan school committee; and city councilors in general Rebecca Lisi and Michael Sullivan.

The preliminary election comes less than two months before the general election, when voters will decide not only a new mayor, but at least five new city council members. This is the number of incumbents who refused to stand for municipal elections. And there are contested races for the six general seats of the city council and five of the city’s seven wards.

“This is definitely a time of transformation,” said Matt Szafranski, editor of the Western Massachusetts Politics & Insight blog and a longtime follower of Holyoke politics.

Szafranski said that many Morse opponents over the years have rallied behind Sullivan, but not entirely. Those who have supported Morse over the years seem to be drawn to the other candidates, he said. Some people will choose the municipal or administrative experience of Sullivan, Lisi, Garcia or Sheehan, while others will be drawn to the philosophy of bringing together the people Glidden and Caballero Roca married during the election campaign, he said. .

Candidates on issues

In campaign materials, Glidden said he intends to stand up for the city’s schools, work with the Police Department to build on their ‘exemplary’ community policing, and work with Holyoke Gas & Electric. to keep the city away from fossil fuels. He said he wanted to promote Holyoke’s assets to make the town a prime location for business and provide affordable and market-priced housing in part by rehabilitating the existing housing stock.

Lisi highlighted her 14 years on city council, as her work to revitalize the city’s urban core by bringing in new businesses, including the cannabis industry. She advocated for a municipal broadband internet network, planning to take back control of the city over its schools from the state, and working to implement “budget-conscious, evidence-based approaches to reduce crime ”while limiting the costs of overtime in the police department and empowering a citizens’ commission to ensure transparency and accountability.

Garcia shed light on his experience in managing municipal finances as an administrator for the City of Blandford. He said his priority would be to improve city hall operations to protect public funds and local assets. He said he would tackle the city’s deficits and increase free cash balances, develop sound financial policies, establish a capital improvement program and increase the city’s stabilization accounts.

Sullivan touted his economic development plans, promising to support industries such as cannabis manufacturing, hydroponics and robotics seeking to move downtown, as well as to rehabilitate buildings and build new ones there. infrastructure. He said he would work to end a moratorium on natural gas in the city, improve hydropower capacity and implement more active monitoring of commercial properties in the city.

In a candidate forum earlier this month, Kosinski spoke about his background in marketing, sales and negotiation. He said he intends to focus on education and tackling crime, which will help attract businesses to the city. He also said he wants to improve the way city departments communicate and work together, and is committed to getting public feedback from city residents.

Caballero Roca often spoke of investing in the people of the city. Its platform includes investments in housing across the city, preserving and expanding green spaces, improving transport, and prioritizing green energy and food sustainability in the context of climate change. As an academic and educator, she vowed to fight for local control of the city’s schools and the expansion of educational opportunities.

Sheehan made his central campaign plots renewing the city’s commitment to city infrastructure, economic development and community building. He said he would fully assess the city’s properties and create an advisory committee on capital improvements, and work with city council and the Office of Planning and Economic Development to streamline ordinances and commercialize the city. city ​​in order to attract new businesses.

Campaign financing

Some mayoral candidates have already raised and spent significant sums as Tuesday approaches.

In August – the most recent month for which data is available for all applicants – Glidden raised by far the most money with $ 11,122. Lisi raised $ 4,335 in August, Sheehan $ 2,725, Caballero Roca $ 1,625 and Sullivan $ 1,115, according to data from the state’s Office of Campaign and Political Finance.

Some candidates, however, have filed more up-to-date campaign finance data with the state, also covering receipts for September. Glidden raised $ 3,213, Lisi $ 2,459 and Caballero Roca $ 275 in September.

Available state campaign finance data shows that Sullivan raised the most money this year: $ 59,317, of which $ 20,000 was transferred from his previous campaign account. Glidden raised $ 49,501, Lisi $ 41,276 including $ 7,916 from a previous account, Sheehan $ 26,664 including $ 8,044 from a previous account, Garcia $ 8,260 and Caballero Roca $ 5,444.

Kosinski did not raise any money and did not launch any official campaign.

Of the $ 196,411 that has been raised in total so far in the race, $ 150,257 has been donated by donors who have identified their profession. Of that $ 150,257, about 40% was donated by retirees, business owners and managers, developers and lawyers.

As the preliminary elections approached, candidates spent substantial amounts of campaign money.

As of August 31, Sullivan had spent $ 40,442 – the highest amount of any candidate. Much of that money was spent on video ads and advertisements, including $ 20,500 spent with the Northampton campaign advertising company Horgan Associates and $ 5,000 on Facebook advertising.

During this period, Lisi spent $ 31,777, including $ 4,505 on billboards, $ 3,600 on political consultation with the firm Almquist and Associates and $ 2,782 on lawn posters and stickers from the union printing company The Blue. Deal.

Glidden’s $ 27,007 expenses included $ 8,750 paid to campaign manager John Dolan of Northampton, $ 3,475 on signage for a Texas-based company, $ 2,754 on direct mail and $ 2,500 on campaign launch video.

Sheehan spent $ 11,562 through August, including $ 2,938 on direct mail, $ 2,300 on advertising and $ 828 on garden signs. Garcia spent $ 9,303, including $ 2,683 at LGR Production, for video advertising and Facebook advertising services. And Caballero Roca spent $ 3,705, including $ 800 for campaign consultant Juan Sanchez, $ 505 on road signs and $ 459 on flyers.

Some candidates have gone public with the approvals they have received and local groups have shown support for their preferred candidates.

The A Better Holyoke for All group – formerly the Keep Holyoke Affordable for All committee, which successfully opposed a 2019 tax exemption vote issue to fund the construction of two new colleges – approved Sullivan. He is part of a list of candidates that the group has supported.

Lisi, meanwhile, has gained approval from a handful of city officials and unions, including the Massachusetts Nurses Association and the Western Mass Area Labor Federation, as well as the only two Latinas who currently sit on city council: Councilor. long-time resident of 1 Gladys Lebrón district. -Martinez and Libby Hernandez from Room 4.

Garcia received the endorsement of State Senator Adam Gomez, D-Springfield, the first Puerto Rican to ever serve in the state Senate.

Dusty Christensen can be contacted at dchristensen@gazettenet.com.


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Missouri Secretary of State Ashcroft wants non-partisan local elections to become partisan https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/missouri-secretary-of-state-ashcroft-wants-non-partisan-local-elections-to-become-partisan/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/missouri-secretary-of-state-ashcroft-wants-non-partisan-local-elections-to-become-partisan/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 11:20:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/missouri-secretary-of-state-ashcroft-wants-non-partisan-local-elections-to-become-partisan/ Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft believes turnout in local Missouri elections would be better if they were partisan. In the 2020 presidential election, voter turnout in Missouri was 70%, a stark contrast to non-partisan municipal elections in the state which can see as few as 10% of voters go to the polls. That’s why Ashcroft […]]]>

Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft believes turnout in local Missouri elections would be better if they were partisan.

In the 2020 presidential election, voter turnout in Missouri was 70%, a stark contrast to non-partisan municipal elections in the state which can see as few as 10% of voters go to the polls. That’s why Ashcroft is considering a measure to narrow that gap, asking candidates for local offices to choose a party.

“Local government can be more important in people’s day-to-day lives than at state and federal levels,” Ashcroft said, adding that it is not good that big decisions about people’s day-to-day lives are determined by the outcome of the elections with so few people showing up to the polls.

“If we were to make some of these supporters, we’re not trying to make them more combative, would that help more people get out?” Does calling them non-partisan make people think they aren’t important? “

Such a decision would require legislation and would likely be the subject of fierce debate. But the idea is already not appealing to some election officials, officials and voting experts.

One objection is the possibility of discouraging people from running for public office.

“Say I want to run to the local school board,” said Anita Manion, professor of political science at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. “But for me, it’s not a partisan issue. For me, it is about strengthening our education system and not alienating oneself from neighbors who belong to another political party.

Rolla City Councilor Jody Eberly is an example of a candidate who would be put off by the prospect of being forced to choose a party.

“I can tell you that I probably wouldn’t be running,” Eberly said. “Over the past couple of years things have gotten so resentful and bitter and polarized that I think there are a lot of good people out there who just wouldn’t want to be involved in it.”

Rolla saw the 2021 municipal election turnout at 12%, up from 15% in 2020.

Eberly said it is ultimately the responsibility of local election candidates to walk through neighborhoods and encourage people to run for local elections. She wants more people to vote, but says making them partisan is not the way to achieve that, and she has allies among election advocates.

“There are better ways to increase voter turnout,” said Marilyn McLeod, President of Missouri League of Women Voters. “A simple would be like we did a year ago during COVID, where we made mail-in ballots more widely available, and people really liked that. “

McLeod said that before the state considers a drastic change like eliminating non-partisan elections, it should first make sure it’s as easy as possible to vote.

No excuse mail-in ballots, early voting and more mailing options are proven to increase voter turnout, Manion said.

But she said there might be a way to get the turnout in a partisan election without forcing city and school board candidates to choose a party, by combining their elections.

“So instead of voting five times in Missouri, you maybe vote once a year. These things have been shown to have much more of an effect on voter turnout than anything like making elections more partisan, ”Manion said.

But even this has criticism. If the state, federal, county, city, school board, and other races were all on the same ballot, and all with different district lines, it could mean that each constituency may have to offer dozens of different ballots.

“The number of divisions or different voting styles that these constituencies would have to create would, in my opinion, lead to more confusion among voters, and it would create an undue burden on the electoral authority in these areas,” said the clerk. from Pulaski County, Dave Ernst.

Political parties can see this proposal as a great way to build a pipeline of candidates for higher positions.

“It would certainly clarify which party a city council member belongs to, and they would have the experience of running for office with the support of their party,” Manion said.

Jonathan ahl

Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft in 2020 meeting in Rolla with local election officials

Ashcroft’s idea is far from reality, as it cannot even be presented as a possible change in law until the legislature meets in January.

He said it deserves consideration and could be a way to encourage diversity in political thought instead of just another race between Republicans and Democrats.

“You can run as a green, libertarian candidate, you can be a constitutional candidate. People of all those ran. Especially in local races, individuals and small groups are more likely to be successful, ”said Ashcroft.

But regardless, the decision to change the local elections would rest with the state legislature, a group of Republicans and Democrats who were all elected through partisan elections.

Follow Jonathan on Twitter: @JonathanAhl



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Candidature file for the municipal council, school board | News, Sports, Jobs https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/candidature-file-for-the-municipal-council-school-board-news-sports-jobs/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/candidature-file-for-the-municipal-council-school-board-news-sports-jobs/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 22:37:35 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/candidature-file-for-the-municipal-council-school-board-news-sports-jobs/ TR FILE PHOTO – Local voters will be able to vote for city council and school board candidates on November 2, in the combined city / school election. Fourteen Marshalltown residents have met the 5 p.m. deadline to submit nomination papers with the required signatures to run for positions on Marshalltown City Council or Marshalltown […]]]>

TR FILE PHOTO – Local voters will be able to vote for city council and school board candidates on November 2, in the combined city / school election.

Fourteen Marshalltown residents have met the 5 p.m. deadline to submit nomination papers with the required signatures to run for positions on Marshalltown City Council or Marshalltown School Board.

Eight of the 14 are running for four city council seats. Two of those candidates are running for mayor – incumbent Joel Greer and candidate Serina Stabenow. Greer has been mayor since 2017. Prior to that, he served as a City Councilor for Ward 2 for six years.

Mike Ladehoff is running to keep his seat on the board. Ladehoff represents the first quarter. He got his job in a special election earlier in 2021 after Sue Cahill stepped down to sit in the Iowa House of Representatives.

Running for the third room is Dex Walker. Incumbent Mike Gowdy did not submit paperwork.

Mark Eaton, Barry Kell, Jeff Schneider and Dean Stucky are on the loose for two positions.

There were six people who handed in the papers for three seats at the Marshalltown school board table. The three positions soon available are held by Karina Hernandez, Mike Miller and Bea Niblock. Hernandez was the only holder to file. Neither Miller nor Niblock – who is the chairman of the board – are seeking re-election.

The other five candidates running for the Marshalltown school board and will be on the November ballot are Becky Kouang, Bonnie Lowry, Melissa Nine, Leah Stanley and Zachary Wahl.

The election will take place on November 2, with polling stations open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Postal ballots can be requested until October 18. The deadline for in-person postal voting is November 1 at 5 p.m.

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Young activist candidates try to get their peers to come out and vote https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/young-activist-candidates-try-to-get-their-peers-to-come-out-and-vote/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/young-activist-candidates-try-to-get-their-peers-to-come-out-and-vote/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 12:05:24 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/young-activist-candidates-try-to-get-their-peers-to-come-out-and-vote/ “It’s hard to say for sure why this is,” Watkins said. “But it definitely seems to be a model not just here, but across the country.” In the August primary election, only 24% of King County voters in the lowest age bracket, 18 to 24, voted. The same election saw almost 65% turnout among voters […]]]>

“It’s hard to say for sure why this is,” Watkins said. “But it definitely seems to be a model not just here, but across the country.”

In the August primary election, only 24% of King County voters in the lowest age bracket, 18 to 24, voted. The same election saw almost 65% turnout among voters 65 and over. While Watkins says recent youth voter turnout in King County does not indicate any major changes to higher youth engagement from previous years, a 2020 survey from the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning & Engagement found that 27% of 18 to 24-year-olds said they took part in protests that year, an 11-point jump from 2018.

Allison Kirste, a recent University of Washington graduate, was the chair of the academic chapter of WashPIRG, a non-partisan student group that promotes civic engagement. As the campaign coordinator for the organization’s New Voters Project, Kirste had numerous conversations with students whose ballots were waiting unopened on the kitchen counter at their parents’ homes in Tacoma, Shoreline or Yakima.


This is the third story in a three part series on young people in politics. The first part focuses on the young progressive candidates for the election in Washington. while the second part focuses on Seattle activists who entered politics.


While Kirste says registration is a barrier for young voters who move often – voters must re-register with every change of address – she sensed in her conversations with young voters a problem beyond logistics. Young people, she said, were not convinced the vote would change much.

“We see, especially among young people, a feeling of boredom with electoral politics,” said Kirste.

Kirste herself, who has spent two and a half years ‘getting the vote out’, does not see voting as the only, or even the most effective, means of civic engagement.

Last summer, protesters in Seattle paid house calls to city council members, the mayor and even the chief of police, demanding a racially just justice system. “Define the police” was one of the many rallying cries of the summer, but now, in the November general election, there are few options to “reject” the police budget.

“Young people are probably one of the most, if not the most passionate about politics,” Kirste said. “There is a lot of frustration with how the political system works, so civic action has to manifest itself in other ways, such as demonstrations. It’s about finding other ways to be heard.

In Seattle, police fundraisers have prison abolitionists like Nikkita Oliver and Nicole Thomas-Kennedy on the November ballot, respectively, for a seat on city council and a city attorney. But none of the city’s mayoral candidates are promising to eliminate incarceration or drastically cut police funding.

Chetan Soni is a sophomore high school student and local activist who recently worked on the youth campaign team for progressive mayoral candidate Andrew Grant Houston. Soni was drawn to the campaign because of Houston’s daring plan to fund the police. It didn’t hurt that Houston came from an activist background: Soni had already organized alongside him with the Sunrise Movement, the youth-led climate action campaign.

“You have to do community outreach on the ground, but you also have to do electoral politics to see the change you want to see,” Soni said. “There is neither. You need both.

With this in mind, Soni likes to break her organizational capacity down into three parts: 25% within the system, putting pressure on elected officials; 50% community work, such as its involvement in mutual aid networks that distribute food, water and supplies to people in need; and 25% electoral politics, such as his recent work on the Houston campaign, which garnered less than 3% of the vote despite a contribution of $ 400,000.

Soni does not have a strong desire to run for office. But, during the recent regional elections, some young people registered their name on the ballot.

Varisha Khan, who was an activist student at the University of Washington, became the first Muslim woman elected to Redmond City Council in 2019, when she was 24. Mohamed Abdi, a 24-year-old Somali born in a Kenyan refugee camp, is currently running for Tukwila city council.

Abdi says activism is all he knows. In 2016, when the death of his 16-year-old cousin was initially considered suicide, Abdi and his family rallied the community to demand that the Seattle Police Department conduct a more thorough and transparent investigation. Investigators ultimately concluded that the teenager died of an accidental fall.

“It was a great moment because it just showed the beauty of bringing people together and how important it is, you know, to be there for each other,” Abdi said. “There is nothing like it.”

Abdi recognizes that today’s systems fail people of color, exactly, he suspects, as they were designed to do. But he remains optimistic about electoral politics.

“I come from an activist and organizing background that brought together East Africans, Blacks and Muslims,” Abdi said. “I don’t need a title to validate this. I just want to be in a position where I can have even more impact.

Even though progressive youth can mobilize a population with low turnout, a certain cynicism can remain.

“I feel like it is only a matter of time before elected community activists become career politicians because of this culture inside government offices,” said Soni, the teenage activist from Seattle. “It’s a lot of pressure to be against the establishment from within the establishment.”


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5 candidates run for special election in San Antonio to replace former state representative Leo Pacheco https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/5-candidates-run-for-special-election-in-san-antonio-to-replace-former-state-representative-leo-pacheco/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/5-candidates-run-for-special-election-in-san-antonio-to-replace-former-state-representative-leo-pacheco/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 15:20:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/5-candidates-run-for-special-election-in-san-antonio-to-replace-former-state-representative-leo-pacheco/ Tuesday, September 14, 2021 Posted Through Patrick Svitek, The Texas Tribune on Tue Sep 14, 2021 To 10:20 a.m. Facebook / Lucy Adame-Clark State Representative Leo Pacheco has left Texas House to teach at San Antonio College. Five candidates ran in the September 28 special election to take the seat of former state representative Leo […]]]>

Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Posted
Through Patrick Svitek, The Texas Tribune on Tue Sep 14, 2021 To 10:20 a.m.

  • Facebook / Lucy Adame-Clark
  • State Representative Leo Pacheco has left Texas House to teach at San Antonio College.

Five candidates ran in the September 28 special election to take the seat of former state representative Leo Pacheco D-San Antonio, according to the secretary of state’s office.

The deadline was 5 p.m. Monday.

Pacheco gave up his seat in House District 118 last month to take a job at San Antonio College. The district is Democratic-friendly territory, although Republicans have targeted it as they attempt to make South Texas a new battleground in 2022.

Candidates who have filed include three Democrats and two Republicans. They are:

  • Democrat Katie Farias, member of the Southside Independent School District Board of Managers
  • Republican John Lujan, former representative of HD-118
  • Democrat Desi Martinez, Eminent Advocate General
  • Democrat Frank Ramirez, Former Director of Zoning and Planning for the City of San Antonio
  • Republican Adam Salyer, the 2020 GOP candidate for the seat.

Early voting for the special elections begins in a week.

The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, non-partisan media organization that educates – and engages with – Texans about public policy, politics, government, and statewide issues.

Stay up to date with news and sights from San Antonio. Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

Tags: Rep. Leo Pacheco, San Antonio, Texas House, District 118, Special Election, Democrats, Republicans, Democratic-Leaning Districts, Katie Farias, Southside ISD, John Lujan, Desi Martinez, Frank Ramirez, City of San Antonio, Planning and Zoning, Adam Salyer , San Antonio College, Image


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Race for President Hopi will be revenge for 2017 election https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/race-for-president-hopi-will-be-revenge-for-2017-election/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/race-for-president-hopi-will-be-revenge-for-2017-election/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 21:53:57 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/race-for-president-hopi-will-be-revenge-for-2017-election/ FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) – The race for President Hopi will be a revenge for the last general election. Tribal Council member David Norton Talayumptewa was the top voter in Thursday’s primary with 298 votes, followed by current President Tim Nuvangyaoma with 291 votes, unofficial results show. The two will face each other in the general […]]]>

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) – The race for President Hopi will be a revenge for the last general election.

Tribal Council member David Norton Talayumptewa was the top voter in Thursday’s primary with 298 votes, followed by current President Tim Nuvangyaoma with 291 votes, unofficial results show.

The two will face each other in the general election on November 11. Nuvangyaoma defeated Talayumptewa in the 2017 general election by more than 325 votes.

Turnout for Thursday’s primary was low with 945 votes cast. The ballot did not feature the vice presidential candidates as only two people are running, meaning that current vice president Clark Tenakhongva and Craig Andrews automatically went into the general election.

Andrew Qumyintewa finished third in the presidential primary elections, with 286 votes. Former Vice President Alfred Lomahquahu Jr. was behind with 70 votes. Candidates have a few days to submit challenges before results can be certified, said Karen Shupla, tribal clerk.

The two main elected officials of the tribe do not show up on a ticket, but Nuvangyaoma has campaigned with Andrews. Nuvangyaoma did not immediately respond to a message left by The Associated Press on Friday.

The leaders derive much of their authority from the Hopi Tribal Council, which functions as a municipal government. The president chairs the meetings but only votes to break the tie.

Talayumptewa, a former head of the US Bureau of Education, represents Kykotsmovi on the board where he championed a measure to unify the various schools on the reserve under a single district and education board.

“There is going to be some consistency in the way we teach them, and that is going to improve learning and academic achievement,” he told the AP.

Talayumptewa and Nuvangyaoma spoke in a recent forum and on social media where much of their campaigning was about the need for economic development and finding ways to encourage Hopi youth to get involved in tribal government.

One of the obstacles to running for office is a requirement for candidates to speak the Hopi language and demonstrate this ability, Nuvangyaoma said at a youth-led forum earlier this week in Phoenix. Prior to 2017, applicants had to be fluent.

“Our young people, all of you here today, talk about technology, finance, development, healthcare, education, construction, all these languages ​​that you speak and understand,” he said. “We have to bring Hopi into the era we are in now.”

Nuvangyaoma proposed to reform the constitution which was first approved in the 1930s.

Talayumptewa said he wanted to maintain the language requirement, establish a language immersion school on the Hopi reservation in northeast Arizona, and actively contact young Hopi professionals to help lead the government.

“This is what sets us apart as a Hopi nation, this is how we practice our traditions, our culture and our religion,” he said. “I think there are ways to teach the Hopi language to maintain it.”


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Electoral board certifies 33 candidates for Cincy Council race, but more may be on the way https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/electoral-board-certifies-33-candidates-for-cincy-council-race-but-more-may-be-on-the-way/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/electoral-board-certifies-33-candidates-for-cincy-council-race-but-more-may-be-on-the-way/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 21:05:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/electoral-board-certifies-33-candidates-for-cincy-council-race-but-more-may-be-on-the-way/ The Hamilton County Electoral Board certified another candidate for Cincinnati City Council in the November ballot, bringing the total to 33 so far – but at least two more names could be added to the list. The board split 2-2 on petitions for Republican Tom Brinkman, who is currently the state representative, and Democrat Te’Airea […]]]>

The Hamilton County Electoral Board certified another candidate for Cincinnati City Council in the November ballot, bringing the total to 33 so far – but at least two more names could be added to the list.

The board split 2-2 on petitions for Republican Tom Brinkman, who is currently the state representative, and Democrat Te’Airea Powell. Both had dates missing on some of their petitions.

Republicans on the board say substantial compliance is all that is required, and technical details like missing dates on partial petitions do not invalidate the entire petition. Both Democrats say they have disqualified people in the past for missing dates on partial petitions and the board should be consistent.

The Ohio Secretary of State will review the cases and decide whether to certify Brinkman and Powell on the ballot. The county electoral board can, however, change its vote before this happens. The council will meet again Thursday at 8 am to review the files.

Republican Linda Matthews is also expected to seek a reconsideration. The board denied her requests because she had failed to meet the 500 signature requirement.

Matthews is one of four candidates approved by Republicans for the board. The other three Republicans on the ballot currently sit on the board: Betsy Sundermann and interim members Liz Keating and Steve Goodin.

Long-time former board member Charlie Winburn – a Republican who served as the county’s interim treasurer – has qualified for the ballot to be repeated, but Winburn says he will step down.

The board of directors also voted to certify a charter amendment motivated by a ballot petition. Brinkman circulated petitions for his multi-part charter amendment, which includes provisions such as lowering council members’ salaries and creating a mayoral dismissal process.


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Here are the candidates for municipal elections in Horry County | New https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/here-are-the-candidates-for-municipal-elections-in-horry-county-new/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/here-are-the-candidates-for-municipal-elections-in-horry-county-new/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 21:37:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/here-are-the-candidates-for-municipal-elections-in-horry-county-new/ The tabling of municipal elections in Horry County has been completed. The final towns and villages still accepting candidates for the fall races closed the depot on Friday at noon. Here are the candidates for these positions: Myrtle Beach Mayor Brenda Bethune (i) CD Rosza Bill mcclure Ho gene Tammie Durant City Council (three seats) […]]]>

The tabling of municipal elections in Horry County has been completed.

The final towns and villages still accepting candidates for the fall races closed the depot on Friday at noon.

Here are the candidates for these positions:

Myrtle Beach

Mayor

Brenda Bethune (i)

CD Rosza

Bill mcclure

Ho gene

Tammie Durant

City Council (three seats)

Alex Fogel

Jackie Hatley (I)

Mike Lowder (I)

John newman

Gregg Smith (i)

Remarks: The Mayor of Myrtle Beach is paid $ 50,000 per year and receives a monthly car allowance of $ 500, Council members are paid $ 15,000 per year and receives a monthly car allowance of $ 495. Civil servants are elected in general, which means that they represent the whole city rather than specific neighborhoods. Elections are also non-partisan.

North Myrtle Beach

Mayor

Marilyn Hatley (I)

Wayne troutman

City council in general (one seat)

Bill Davis

Trey Skidmore III (i)

Ocean Drive Ward Council (one seat)

Bubba collins

Norfleet Jones

Windy Hill Ward Council (one seat)

Nikki Fontana (i)

Jolene puffer

Notes: North Myrtle Beach City Council members serve four-year terms. The mayor is paid $ 48,076.08 per year and council members receive $ 24,114.96 per year. However, from January 1 this will change. The mayor will receive $ 52,402.93 per year and council members will receive $ 26,285.31 per year. North Myrtle Beach elected officials do not receive vehicle allowance.

Aynor

Mayor

John Gardner (i)

City Council (two seats)

Cheryl Skipper (i)

Tony Godsey Sr. (i)

Notes: Aynor municipal council members serve four-year terms and are elected at large. The mayor is paid $ 8,500 per year and council members receive $ 600 per year.

Atlantic beach

City Council (two seats)

Jim DeWitt

Edward Lamar Campbell

Notes: Atlantic Beach City Council members serve four-year terms and are elected at large. They are paid $ 4,800 per year. The mayor, who is not running for re-election this year, receives $ 6,000 a year.

Conway

Autry benton

Amanda butler

William Goldfinch (i)

Julie hardwick

Beth helms

Shane Hubbard (i)

Danny hardee

Notes: Conway City Council members serve four-year terms and are elected at large. The mayor, who is not running for re-election this year, is paid $ 16,000 per year while the mayor pro tem receives $ 11,000. The rest of the board receive $ 10,000 per year.

Loris

City Council (three seats)

Michael Suggs (i)

Carroll Padgett (i)

Andrea Coleman

Notes: Loris City Council members serve a three-year term and are paid $ 3,120 per year. The mayor, who is not running for re-election this year, receives $ 7,020 per year. All members of the board are elected in general.

Surf Beach

City Council (three seats)

Shawn shoemaker

LaVerne Kreklau

Laurence McKeen

Judy Henion

Alex samsel

William kinken

Chris Stamey

Notes: Surfside Beach City Council members serve four-year terms and are paid $ 6,000 per year. The mayor, who is not running for re-election this year, receives $ 9,600 per year. It will be the first general election in the city under the new plurality rules. Unlike in the past with multiple candidates, the candidates who obtain the most votes will be declared the winners. There will only be a second round in the event of a tie. Officials say this could save the city nearly $ 2,500 in additional expenses needed for a run-off election.

Briarcliffe Acres

City Council (two seats)

Brian Palliser (i)

Laura Pendley (i)

Notes: Briarcliffe Acres City Council members serve a four-year term and receive no remuneration for their service. They are elected in general.

* i designates the holder


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First Nations leaders support Liberal candidate at NDP event https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/first-nations-leaders-support-liberal-candidate-at-ndp-event/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/first-nations-leaders-support-liberal-candidate-at-ndp-event/#respond Tue, 31 Aug 2021 23:46:50 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/first-nations-leaders-support-liberal-candidate-at-ndp-event/ Two Manitoba First Nations leaders backed a Liberal candidate running in the north of the province as he stood next to NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh at an election event. Singh and two NDP candidates seeking re-election met with Manitoba First Nations leaders in Winnipeg last week to discuss some of the pressing issues facing Indigenous […]]]>

Two Manitoba First Nations leaders backed a Liberal candidate running in the north of the province as he stood next to NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh at an election event.

Singh and two NDP candidates seeking re-election met with Manitoba First Nations leaders in Winnipeg last week to discuss some of the pressing issues facing Indigenous communities, such as housing and mental health.

While the chiefs said they were grateful to Singh and his team for organizing this one-on-one during a busy election campaign, they said they would support Liberal candidate Shirley Robinson at the expense of of NDP incumbent Niki Ashton in the Churchill-Keewatinook Aski race because they want more. Indigenous voices in the Parliament of Canada.

Singh vowed to renew Canada’s relations with First Nations peoples after a traumatic year when preliminary inquiries at a number of former residential school sites across the country indicated that hundreds of children could be buried on the island. ground. He said Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau was not doing enough to locate First Nations children who may be in these anonymous graves.

“Canada’s conscience was shaken after the first discovery of the first 215 children.… It pushes us to go beyond the words we have heard from leaders in the past – we need action,” said Singh said at a press conference. conference after the meeting, referencing findings from Kamloops, BC, earlier this year.

“We want to be allies and we want to be side by side, walk a path of justice, respect, dignity, walk this path recognizing that we should work with Indigenous communities as nation-to-nation partners” , Singh said.

“We will always advance our First Nations candidates”

But the two regional chiefs there, Grand Chief Arlen Dumas of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs and Grand Chief of Garrison Settee of Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak (MKO), made it clear that their loyalty lay elsewhere – at least in one race. .

Ashton, a longtime NDP MP, is running for re-election against Robinson, a former First Nations band councilor from Cross Lake, Manitoba, in the province’s northernmost riding.

Settee said he had “nothing but respect for Jagmeet Singh on a personal level,” but he endorsed Robinson’s candidacy for the outgoing NDP chairman.

“The candidate running in our riding – she is aboriginal, and we want aboriginal people to be involved in this process,” said Settee. “We have a vested interest in what is happening in Canada as it relates to Indigenous Peoples and we continue to support Indigenous Peoples as they race. “

The MKO, which represents 26 First Nations in Manitoba’s Treaty 4, 5, 6 and 10 regions, is officially “non-partisan,” said Settee, but “we all support strong leaders.”

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and Grand Chief Garrison Settee of Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak, left, listen to Grand Chief Arlen Dumas of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, right, following a meeting in Winnipeg on August 26 . (Paul Chiasson / Canadian Press)

“We will always advance our First Nations candidates,” added Dumas. “I think it’s time for a fresh start in the north and I absolutely support Shirley Robinson for her candidacy,” he said, as Singh and the NDP contingent stood behind him.

The couch moved forward and said, “I agree with that comment.”

  • Have an election question for CBC News? Email us: Ask@cbc.ca

Ashton, who is not Indigenous, has long championed Indigenous and northern issues in Ottawa, pushing for an investigation into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls and for clean water on reserves, among others. She easily won the seat in the 2019 election with over 50% of the vote.

‘There was nothing brought to the North by her’

Ashton was not at the NDP press conference where Dumas and Settee supported Robinson.

Asked about Robinson’s endorsement by First Nations leaders, Singh said on Friday that “it should be very clear that I support my candidate.”

“Niki Ashton has been a strong voice for Indigenous peoples and has a proven track record, and New Democrats in general have shown that we back our words with action. People cannot afford four more years with Mr. Trudeau. he said.

“We are committed to making sure people get the help they need. The New Democrats have demonstrated time and time again that we will fight for them.

NDP MP Niki Ashton addresses reporters following a live Facebook town hall hosted by the Canadian Nurses Association in Ottawa on Wednesday, September 6, 2017. (Sean Kilpatrick / Canadian Press)

Reached by phone Tuesday, Dumas said he maintained his endorsement, saying Ashton had “absolutely not” done a good job as an MP for the region.

“You know, she didn’t bring anything to the North. There weren’t any bills. There weren’t any further pleas. It seems Mrs Ashton is using this position for self-promotion. It seems. that, you know, she used the auspices of this office for her own personal gain and didn’t do anything for us, ”Dumas said in an interview with CBC Manitoba, referring to Ashton’s previous NDP leadership candidacy. .

Dumas said First Nations leaders were particularly disappointed with his response to the Churchill Railroad question. The railroad was taken out of service when record flooding in 2017 washed away portions of the rail line all the way to Hudson Bay, leaving northern Manitoba with no land connection to the rest of the province.

Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Breaks Tradition to Support Candidate in Churchill Keewatinook-Aski Northern Riding

The CMA is backing a Liberal candidate in a Manitoba riding that the NDP has held since 2008. That endorsement first happened right in front of the NDP leader. 2:11

Local First Nations leaders wanted an Indigenous-led group to own the line, but Ashton was pushing for nationalization instead, Dumas said.

The line was eventually repaired with federal funds and is now operated by Arctic Gateway Group, a coalition of local rail communities, regional First Nations, Saskatchewan grain and pulse trader AGT Food and Ingredients and the Toronto-based Fairfax Financial portfolio.

“The Premier got personally involved in this file to try to find a lasting and defensible solution for northern Manitoba,” said Dumas.

WATCH: Two Manitoba First Nations leaders support Liberal candidate at NDP event

Two Manitoba First Nations leaders support Liberal candidate at NDP event

Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Arlen Dumas explains why he is supporting Liberal candidate Shirley Robinson against NDP incumbent Niki Ashton in a race in northern Manitoba. 7:16

In a statement Tuesday, Ashton defended his record on Indigenous issues.

“I am proud to work with my NDP colleagues to fight for justice for Indigenous peoples,” she said. “I have been honored to receive the support of so many Aboriginal people in the five elections I have been a candidate for. I again ask for their support to continue the fight for the improvement of health, housing, education and infrastructure. The fight for justice for Indigenous and northern communities continues. “

The constituency is 75 percent indigenous

Robinson, the Liberal, called on First Nations people in the riding – in which about 75 percent of people identify as First Nations, Métis or Inuit – to send an Indigenous person to Ottawa.

“We are the majority in this constituency,” she recently told a group of leaders, as reported by the Thompson Citizen, a local newspaper. “What we need is a loud voice from a native speaker in the halls of influence. We need an Ininiw voice in there. I am impatient and ready to be your voice,” she said, using the term for a Cree-speaking speaker.

“Sitting across from government year after year does nothing to advance our dreams as Churchill-Keewatinook Aski communities, whether they are on reserves or as municipalities,” she said, while extolling the liberal investments made in the constituency.

The Liberal government made Indigenous issues a priority while in government, pouring billions of dollars in new funds to end drinking water advisories, fix First Nations schools, put in place a new Indigenous-led child welfare system and reviving Indigenous languages ​​lost during centuries of colonialism, among other commitments.

On the issue of residential schools, the government has allocated more than $ 300 million to help communities with their research.

But Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau has also been criticized for slow changes on some pressing issues – the government has pledged to implement all of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s calls to action, but work remains on good many of them – and for ongoing legal proceedings. related to children’s services.

While 109 long-term drinking water advisories have been lifted under Trudeau’s watch, 51 remain in 32 communities.


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Municipal elections see number of new candidates increasing https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/municipal-elections-see-number-of-new-candidates-increasing/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/municipal-elections-see-number-of-new-candidates-increasing/#respond Mon, 30 Aug 2021 00:56:39 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/municipal-elections-see-number-of-new-candidates-increasing/ The mayoral race is also competitive with four candidates listed on the city’s website. Although his name is not yet on the website, Mayor Ted Clugston also announced on Friday his intention to run for City State and on Facebook. Many of the new nominees come from diverse backgrounds, with differences in business, age, race, […]]]>

The mayoral race is also competitive with four candidates listed on the city’s website. Although his name is not yet on the website, Mayor Ted Clugston also announced on Friday his intention to run for City State and on Facebook.

Many of the new nominees come from diverse backgrounds, with differences in business, age, race, education or life experience.

“I think it’s really exciting. I think it shows that the people of Medicine Hat are looking for a change and they are looking for a government that cares about data-driven decision-making, that is accountable and transparent, ”said mayoral candidate Linnsie Clark .

Clark is the only candidate for mayor so far, and her enthusiasm has been shared with others, including city council candidate Bill Bergeson.

“We have retired RCMP, a retired firefighter, we have real estate agents, we have business people and community members with concerns they want to address. It will be an interesting election, ”said Bergeson.

For many of the new applicants, the love of community and the desire for change is part of the push.

“I always say that even in sport we have to change players because change is necessary. Politics too, I think we should give new people a chance and see what they can bring, ”council candidate Praveen Joshi said.

Mayoral candidate Alan Rose, however, believes more and more people are signing up just because they’re fed up.

“I think this shows real dissatisfaction with the current course of the city. If you look, we’ve had discussions about pandemic issues, we’ve had employment issues where the oil and gas has dried up, ”Rose said.

Since the nomination period opened in January, some board candidates and the public have called for the abolition of the old boys’ club, a term used to describe our current board for years.

But councilor Brian Varga said the board works more like a team and he doesn’t think an old boys’ club exists.

” I do not think so. We have differences of opinion when we often sit behind closed doors. Even in open counseling, we have a lot of time when not everyone is okay with things. It might look like this, but there is a lot of discussion going on before these decisions are made. Varga said.

Councilor Jim Turner said board experience is also a big plus, something he hopes to add if elected for a third term.

“It’s really important to understand that the council is the board of directors for the City of Medicine Hat and the City of Medicine Hat is a $ 400 million operation. So if you own stocks in your stock portfolio, wouldn’t you want someone to handle this with some experience? Turner said.

Turner added that while many candidates have criticized the current mayor and council, he believes they are doing a good job, and this is particularly evident right now during COVID-19.

“We had supports for businesses, we had supports for our residents, and a lot of communities couldn’t afford to do it,” Turner said.

The next municipal elections are on October 18.

A list of all running candidates is available here.


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