Election Candidates – Shaughnessy For Congress http://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 09:09:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4.png Election Candidates – Shaughnessy For Congress http://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ 32 32 Mike Greenwell and John Albion headline candidates to fill Frank Mann’s empty seat https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/mike-greenwell-and-john-albion-headline-candidates-to-fill-frank-manns-empty-seat/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 09:09:15 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/mike-greenwell-and-john-albion-headline-candidates-to-fill-frank-manns-empty-seat/ Former Boston Red Sox outfielder Mike Greenwell and former Lee County Commissioner John Albion headline the list of candidates seeking to fill the vacancy created by Frank Mann’s passing last week . Greenwell, Albion, real estate agent Angela Chenaille, chiropractor Joseph Gambino and pressure-washing business owner Matthew Wood qualified before Tuesday’s deadline to run for […]]]>

Former Boston Red Sox outfielder Mike Greenwell and former Lee County Commissioner John Albion headline the list of candidates seeking to fill the vacancy created by Frank Mann’s passing last week .

Greenwell, Albion, real estate agent Angela Chenaille, chiropractor Joseph Gambino and pressure-washing business owner Matthew Wood qualified before Tuesday’s deadline to run for Mann’s empty seat.

Mann died June 21 at his home in Alva after more than four decades of public service. He was 80 years old.

Last Friday, Lee County election officials called for a special election to fill the vacancy in District 5, which represents Lehigh Acres.

The special election will coincide with the August 23 primary and the November 8 general election.

Albion, Gambino and Greenwell are running as Republicans. Chenaille is listed as a written candidate. Wood is running as a Democrat.

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In Colorado and elsewhere, 2020 election deniers seek the best polling places | Top news https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/in-colorado-and-elsewhere-2020-election-deniers-seek-the-best-polling-places-top-news/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 10:07:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/in-colorado-and-elsewhere-2020-election-deniers-seek-the-best-polling-places-top-news/ (Reuters) – Tina Peters, an election official from western Colorado, has been charged with voter tampering and barred by a judge from overseeing voting in her home county this year. But Peters, who echoed former President Donald Trump’s false claims that the 2020 presidential election was rigged, is far from intimidated. She is seeking the […]]]>

(Reuters) – Tina Peters, an election official from western Colorado, has been charged with voter tampering and barred by a judge from overseeing voting in her home county this year.

But Peters, who echoed former President Donald Trump’s false claims that the 2020 presidential election was rigged, is far from intimidated. She is seeking the Republican nomination for secretary of state in Tuesday’s primary contest, a position that would put her in charge of the state’s electoral apparatus.

Peters is among dozens of Republican candidates in November’s midterm elections who have rejected the legitimacy of the 2020 race and are seeking positions with huge influence in future elections, including in battleground states such as Arizona, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Nevada.

There are 23 election deniers in 17 states for the job of secretary of state, usually a state’s top election official, according to a tracker maintained by States United Action, a nonprofit advocacy group.

The races – once low-key – drew intense attention and huge fundraising totals after the 2020 election, when Trump and his allies sought unsuccessfully to alter the results in several key states.

The candidates’ rhetoric has alarmed good government advocacy groups, which warn that the 2024 presidential election could trigger a constitutional crisis if some states refuse to certify the results.

“I think people should be very concerned,” said Jessica Marsden, an attorney for Protect Democracy, a nonprofit group. “There is a very real chance that with their hands on the levers of power, some of these candidates could participate in a similar agenda to alter the outcome of future elections.”

Peters’ campaign did not respond to requests for comment.

Peters is among a slate of Republican candidates for secretary of state, the First Secretary of State’s Coalition, who share similar messages about voter fraud.

The group was founded by Jim Marchant, a former Nevada lawmaker who won that state’s Republican nomination for secretary of state last week. Marchant, who did not respond to a request for comment, said he would not certify Democratic President Joe Biden’s victory in Nevada in 2020.

The coalition has received financial support from The America Project, an organization run in part by Mike Flynn, Trump’s former national security adviser known for spreading election conspiracy theories.

Flynn’s group is also spending $100,000 on last-minute ads attacking Peters’ main Republican rival, Pam Anderson, according to campaign finance records — almost as much as Anderson has raised so far.

A Colorado grand jury indicted Peters in March for allegedly allowing a stranger access to the Mesa County Elections Office, where she serves as a clerk, and copying the voting system’s hard drive.

Peters denied any wrongdoing and accused Democratic Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold of targeting her for political reasons.

The indictment made Peters a hero in some conservative circles. She is a frequent guest on forums promoting election lies and has outdone her Republican opponents.

The breached data that sparked Peters’ criminal charges is cited by pro-Trump activists in presentations to local officials across the country as evidence of baseless conspiracy theories involving rigged voting machines.

“She’s a very patriotic clerk and clerk,” said Mark Cook, a technology consultant who worked for pillow mogul and conspiracy theorist Mike Lindell. Cook was addressing a Lyon County, Nevada, board of commissioners on April 21 in a presentation that cast Peters’ tampering with election materials as a noble act.

Griswold, who is running for re-election, is also president of the Democratic Association of Secretaries of State.

“It’s extremely dangerous, it provokes violence, and it’s being used to set the stage to steal the US election,” she said in an interview, referring to the lies about 2020.

Anderson, Peters’ main Republican opponent, told Reuters that Peters’ false rhetoric was “reckless at a minimum”.

Election officials and officials who serve in these roles must stay above the political fray and push back,” said Anderson, a former county clerk.

(Reporting by Joseph Axe; Additional reporting by Linda So, Jason Szep and Alexandra Ulmer; Editing by Ross Colvin and Daniel Wallis)

Copyright 2022 Thomson Reuters.

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Saline County General Election Candidates Participate in Q&A https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/saline-county-general-election-candidates-participate-in-qa/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 16:01:09 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/saline-county-general-election-candidates-participate-in-qa/ During the meeting with the candidates at the Martin Community Center on June 21, the Salt Fork Pachyderm Club prepared for a question and answer forum. Opposed and non-opposed candidates answered questions leading to roles and responsibilities for the following positions: circuit clerk, county clerk, presiding county commissioner, clerk, auditor and prosecutor. Candidates included: Circuit […]]]>

During the meeting with the candidates at the Martin Community Center on June 21, the Salt Fork Pachyderm Club prepared for a question and answer forum. Opposed and non-opposed candidates answered questions leading to roles and responsibilities for the following positions: circuit clerk, county clerk, presiding county commissioner, clerk, auditor and prosecutor.

Candidates included:

Circuit clerk

— Becky Uhlich (Democrat)

Collector

— Cindi Sims (Republican)

Recorder

— Jessica Baker (Republican)

— Amie Ragan-Brown (Republican)

County Clerk

— Brittni Allison Burton (Republican)

—Carrie Jarvis (Republican)

Presiding County Commissioner

— Becky Platner (Democrat)

– Kile Guthrey (Democrat) – absent

Listener

— Karlin Breshears (Republican)

prosecution attorney

— Tim Thompson (Republican)

Each candidate shared an opening and closing statement during the forum.

“I worked in this office for 12 years…my main job is to maintain court records,” Uhlich said. “There’s nothing more satisfying than going back to the vault and finding a record from the early 1900s when someone asked for it. …Besides the normal annual legislative changes, data processing changes, program challenges and court fee changes – we have seen a fair share of lawyers coming and going, an abundance of changes of judges in trials before jury. If that wasn’t enough, we had to learn how to keep the courts open under COVID protocol. … I would also say that my time as a circuit clerk has been very rewarding.

She added that she had recently completed the Missouri Court Management Institute program. Uhlich graduated from the Supreme Court Building in Jefferson City.

“Generally, if you have business to attend to at the circuit clerk’s office — it’s usually not for anything pleasant — unless you’re applying for a passport or adopting a child,” she continued. “I strive to make this experience the best possible for everyone. It is truly an honor to serve you and all citizens of Saline County as Circuit Clerk. Thank you and I thanks for your support.

Sims shared how she was elected in November 2014. She reflected on things she thought were important and what has been done since taking office.

“We updated our office software – the assessor and I – together – and it’s been a blessing… It helps us all work better together,” Sims said.

She thanked the Salt Fork Pachyderm Club for hosting this forum and she would appreciate the votes from the residents.

“I am your current listener. I was nominated by the governor on September 1, 2020, then I had to turn around and run in the November election,” Breshears said. “Thanks to all of you, I was elected to represent the county as your auditor. Since taking office, we have implemented a new software system, which has helped a lot as we are now all in the same system…I really enjoy my job, I work very closely with all the other officers in the county.…And we do everything we can to balance our budget.

She concluded that if anyone had questions for the Office of the Auditor, she would answer them.

“I’m very happy to be, once again, running for Saline County District Attorney…I’m very grateful, very happy,” Thompson said. “I love what I do as much as I did four years ago.”

The recorder contestants — Baker and Ragan-Brown — each shared a bit about themselves and why they thought they could fill the role.

“I’ve been unknowingly preparing for this job for 11 years,” Ragan-Brown said. “In 2011, I started working for the Saline County Assessor’s Office under Margaret Pond. That’s where I learned a bit about deeds – very basic deeds. The assessor’s office uses it for map changes. … I also learned to read and draw legal descriptions … which is essential in helping people find their deeds. I initially started the GIS program upgrade and worked for three years making map changes to the GIS program…”

“I believe my day-to-day experience … in the office best qualifies me for this position,” Baker said. “I worked closely with the current recorder player, Jamie Nichols, and learned the day-to-day operations of running the recorder office. Like helping clients register and locate deeds, surveys, legal descriptions, marriage licenses…and more.

She explained that she helped implement the new marriage license system.

“Archival preservation is also important to me,” Baker said.

Jarvis said she currently works in the county clerk’s office with current county clerk Debbie Russell.

“I’ve been in the office for five years,” Jarvis continued. “I am the election clerk. If you’ve had elections in the last five years, I’ve been there with you.

“I currently work in the Saline County Assessor’s Office and have been there for five years as of September,” Burton said, opposing Jarvis. “Working there, I learned a lot about our county government offices, and I look forward to continuing that knowledge and hopefully expanding in some way on what we have right now.”

Burton added that she wanted to bring the other offices closer together by working with the county clerk’s office. She indicated that it is a powerful thing.

Finally, Platner ran and is running for presiding county commissioner. She opposes the current Commissioner President Kile Guthrey. Platner said she previously served the public as presiding commissioner from 2003 to 2010.

“The reason I run is because I love the work,” Platner said. “I love being Commissioner President. … There’s a lot of stuff there. The budget has almost doubled since I went. The total overall budget is close to a $36 million budget. You need to understand this budget inside and out. You need to understand the dollars that each of these offices manages and what they collect and work together for you.

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Maharashtra Legislative Council elections: BJP candidates pass, MVA hit by cross votes in Sena and Congress https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/maharashtra-legislative-council-elections-bjp-candidates-pass-mva-hit-by-cross-votes-in-sena-and-congress/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 04:36:48 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/maharashtra-legislative-council-elections-bjp-candidates-pass-mva-hit-by-cross-votes-in-sena-and-congress/ In a blow to the Maha Vikas Aghadi alliance, the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) swept the state Legislative Council polls on Monday as it elected its five candidates – Pravin Darekar, Ram Shinde, Shrikant Bharatiya, Uma Khapre and Prasad Lad. On the other hand, the ruling alliance was blushed by the fact that the Dalit […]]]>

In a blow to the Maha Vikas Aghadi alliance, the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) swept the state Legislative Council polls on Monday as it elected its five candidates – Pravin Darekar, Ram Shinde, Shrikant Bharatiya, Uma Khapre and Prasad Lad. On the other hand, the ruling alliance was blushed by the fact that the Dalit face of Congress, Chandrakant Handore, lost following the cross vote of at least three MPs from Shiv Sena and Congress, and more from its smaller alliance partners. is the second consecutive defeat for the ruling MVA in two weeks, as the BJP on June 10 managed to win over the MVA in the Rajya Sabha polls.

The BJP, which had 106 votes in the Assembly, won 133 votes. The 27 extra votes from other parties and independents paved the way for his victory against MVA, which was more certain of hitting the numbers.

Elections for the Council’s 10 seats had 11 candidates running. While the BJP fielded five candidates, the Congress, NCP and Shiv Sena fielded two candidates each.

Within the MVA, both NCP candidates won comfortably. Eknath Khadse (29 votes) and Ramraje Nimbalkar (27 votes) emerged victorious. The PCN, which has 51 deputies, obtained 56 votes.

While Shiv Sena’s two candidates – Amashya Padavi and Sachin Ahir – won the election by polling the required quota of 26 votes each, the party remained furious as they saw at least three of their MPs engage in cross-voting. Against its total membership of 55 votes, the Shiv Sena only managed to secure 52 votes, leaving three votes uncounted.

The scenario in Congress was worse as neither of its two candidates – Bhai Jagtap and Chandrakant Handore – were able to pass in the first round despite 44 MPs. Against 44 votes, their two candidates received 19 and 22 votes respectively in the first round, for a total of 41 votes.

Although Japtap eventually managed to reach the required quota when counting successive rounds, Handore only got 22 votes.

Speaking to the media, opposition leader Devendra Fadnavis, who had planned the BJP’s strategy, said: “The election result revealed the inherent conflict within the MVA. The cross-voting in the Sena and the Congress showed that their members no longer trust the party and the government.

“The BJP only got 106 votes but they got 133 votes. We got 27 more votes,” he pointed out, adding, “In Rajya Sabha polls, from 106 votes, we got 123 Now our count has been increased to 133 votes.

Shortly after the election results, the Shiv Sena celebrations were marred when their politicians learned of their members’ cross-voting. Several leaders rushed to meet Chief Minister Uddhav Thackeray at his residence.

However, Sena Chief Sachin Ahir said, “Despite trying to defeat me, the BJP could not succeed. Both Sena candidates won.

While expressing his joy at the victory of the NCP, the state party chairman, Jayant Patil, said: “We will have to find out what went wrong in the MVA that led to the defeat of the candidate for Congress Chandrakant Handore”.

The election results show that in a fortnight, the opposition BJP defeated the Maha Vikas Aghadi twice. Earlier, on June 10, the BJP secured three of its Rajya Sabha candidates as Shiv Sena second candidate Sanjay Pawar lost to BJP’s Dhananjay Mahadik. The top three MVA partners could only win one seat each.

The two successive victories of the state BJP show its ability to generate support from small parties and independents, as well as a tactical strategy of vote transfer.

Four BJP candidates – Darekar (29 votes), Shrikant Bharatiya (30 votes), Ram Shinde (30 votes), Uma Khapre (27 votes) – emerged with flying colors in the first round. The fifth candidate, Prasad Lad, received 17 votes in the first round. In the second round, the 12 excess votes went to Lad’s quota, bringing his total to 29.

Earlier, amid major drama, the Legislative Council’s poll count was delayed by two hours. The Congress objected to two ailing BJP members – Laxman Jagtap and Mukta Tilak – asking for help from their aides in the vote. Jagtap and Tilak, who are facing serious health issues, were brought in by road ambulance from Pune.

Senior Congressman Ashok Chavan said, “Laxman Jagtap and Mukta Tilak have signed on the ECI register. If they could sign a register, there was no need for an assistant to help them fill out the ballot. The party filed a written complaint with the returning officer.

As a result, the matter was referred to the office of the Electoral Commission, which dismissed the complaint.

Of the total membership of 288 members of the State Legislative Assembly, 285 members voted in council polls. A Shiv Sena MP, Ramesh Latke, died last month. Two NCP members – minister Nawab Malik and former interior minister Anil Deshmukh – who are in judicial custody and are on trial for separate money laundering cases, were barred from voting.

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Holcomb and Associates Attacked as Too Moderate as GOP Prepares to Nominate Candidates – Indianapolis Business Journal https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/holcomb-and-associates-attacked-as-too-moderate-as-gop-prepares-to-nominate-candidates-indianapolis-business-journal/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 12:45:29 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/holcomb-and-associates-attacked-as-too-moderate-as-gop-prepares-to-nominate-candidates-indianapolis-business-journal/ This campaign mail is labeled as coming from Diego for Indiana, the campaign committee for candidate Secretary of State Diego Morales. Political mail directly attacking Gov. Eric Holcomb and associated GOP candidates as being too moderate has been delivered to delegates ahead of the Indiana Republican Party convention this weekend, escalating an already looming intraparty […]]]>

This campaign mail is labeled as coming from Diego for Indiana, the campaign committee for candidate Secretary of State Diego Morales.

Political mail directly attacking Gov. Eric Holcomb and associated GOP candidates as being too moderate has been delivered to delegates ahead of the Indiana Republican Party convention this weekend, escalating an already looming intraparty showdown.

Mail calls Secretary of State Holli Sullivan “Holcomb’s puppet” and criticizes her for aligning herself too closely with the governor, who the mailing notes vetoed a bill banning transgender girls from playing K-12 girls’ sports and imposing an “authoritarian lockdown” during the pandemic.

Sullivan and Holcomb are pictured on the send-off, standing side-by-side and wearing protective face masks against the pandemic.

A text received by some delegates on Thursday and obtained by IBJ also attacked Sullivan and state treasurer candidates Pete Seat and Elise Nieshalla as lacking the necessary conservative credentials. The text states that the three candidates “are handpicked establishment darlings in the back pockets of Holcomb and Co and will do anything they are told to do. So don’t believe the hype; they are not of us.

The missives raised tensions within the party as 1,800 delegates prepare Saturday to formally nominate GOP nominees for secretary of state, state treasurer and state auditor. The convention is expected to test Holcomb’s political clout among Hoosier’s Republican stalwarts as the governor faces backlash from social conservatives over his response to the pandemic and issues surrounding transgender athletes.

The convention races for secretary of state and treasurer each feature four candidates, some of whom have clear ties to Holcomb.

Sullivan was appointed secretary of state by Holcomb last year to complete the term of Connie Lawson, who stepped down to focus on her health and her family.

The mailing calling Sullivan a “puppet of Holcomb” is labeled as coming from Diego for Indiana, the campaign committee of Sullivan’s convention opponent Diego Morales. The phone number listed as the source of the text has an area code of 973 but the sender is not immediately identifiable.

Morales, who once worked as an adviser to the conservative frontrunner and then the governor. Mike Pence, declined to immediately answer questions about his mailings. Reached by phone Friday morning, he said he was busy meeting delegates over breakfast.

Sullivan did not respond directly to the attacks, but issued a statement noting that over the past year, “we have extended our voter identification law to mail-in ballot applications, increased cybersecurity to protect against foreign interference and doubled the number of post-election audits the state conducts each general election.

Earlier this year, Sullivan publicly supported the Legislature’s overriding of Holcomb’s veto of the transgender athlete bill, saying it was necessary to protect the integrity of women’s sport.

In March, Holcomb said he vetoed the measure because it fell short of his goal of providing clear and consistent state policy and was a solution to a problem that does not exist in Indiana. .

On Thursday, Holcomb’s office referred questions about the attack mail to party officials.

Joe Elsener, executive director of Eric Holcomb’s Indiana campaign and GOP delegate, said the governor’s standing with Hoosiers was proven when he won the 2020 election with a “record number of votes …in one of the toughest election cycles of a generation.” .”

Elsener said he hopes delegates will vote for a competent candidate for secretary of state who will “ensure the integrity of the election, not against a candidate for a reason that has nothing to do with the duties of the office. of the Secretary of State, and certainly not against a candidate”. because of inaccurate statements in this specific mail.

In the race for treasurer, nominee Pete Seat was Holcomb’s communications director when he won his first term as governor in 2016.

Seat and Nieshalla did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

As attacks fly in both the secretary of state and treasurer races, a third-party political action committee has entered the fray, sending campaign mail in favor of Sullivan.

This pro-Sullivan sender is labeled as coming from the Leadership for Indiana PAC.

At least two pro-Sullivan mail received by some delegates has been labeled as coming from the Leadership for Indiana PAC, which is registered with the Federal Election Commission.

A website associated with the PAC, leadershipforindiana.com, says it supports principled conservative Republicans. “We believe Hoosiers should have elected leaders who believe in limited government, lower taxes, less regulation and getting things done,” the website says.

In the first quarter of this year, the PAC listed a donor: Douglas C. Rose, president of Indianapolis-based Irwin R. Rose & Co. Records, shows he gave $175,000 to the PAC on March 28.

Sullivan said in a written statement that she did not know Rose.

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A handful of caucus-backed candidates lose primaries – The Nevada Independent https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/a-handful-of-caucus-backed-candidates-lose-primaries-the-nevada-independent/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 21:42:14 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/a-handful-of-caucus-backed-candidates-lose-primaries-the-nevada-independent/ As the dust from the primary election began to settle, the results of the legislative race began to shed light on which candidates will be in the spotlight in November, as well as multiple upsets against caucus-backed candidates. The key findings also underscored the massive turnover the Legislative Assembly will face in 2023. Three of […]]]>

As the dust from the primary election began to settle, the results of the legislative race began to shed light on which candidates will be in the spotlight in November, as well as multiple upsets against caucus-backed candidates.

The key findings also underscored the massive turnover the Legislative Assembly will face in 2023. Three of the four caucus leaders have left their leadership positions after 2021, and nearly a third of legislative incumbents are either removed from office, or refused to stand for re-election.

Democrats control 12 of 21 state Senate seats and 26 of 42 Assembly seats. The party strengthened its advantages in swing districts after the state redistricting process in 2021, but the looming possibility of a red wave in 2022 could see many of those seats swing. Republicans have not controlled either legislative chamber since 2015.

Although no incumbent was defeated in the primary election, three of the five Republican candidates for the state Senate supported by the caucus leadership did not win, while three of the seven candidates endorsed by the caucus of the GOP Assembly were either losing or in races still too close to call Wednesday. .

On the Democratic side, Selena La Rue Hatch, backed by the state teachers union, upset a candidate endorsed by the Assembly caucus, while two progressive incumbents fended off key challenges backed by business groups .

Report of The New York Times indicates that about 69% of the votes were reported in Washoe County and about 85% were reported in Clark County, Wednesday afternoon. Votes will continue to be counted until Saturday and exact counts will be available at The Nevada Independents Election results page next week.

Senate

Congresswoman Lisa Krasner (R-Reno) took the lead in a close four-way battle to represent Northern Nevada’s Senate District 16, narrowly leading incumbent nominee Don Tatro and right-wing radio host Monica “Jaye “Stabbert.

The four-vote primary, which also included health care businessman Tim Duvall, was one of the most expensive primaries to vote in, with Krasner and Tatro (endorsed by the state Senate GOP) taking both the relatively rare step of airing television advertisements for a legislative primary.

Early results showed Tatro, appointed to the seat last year, leading in Carson City, while Krasner posted leads in Washoe County. The district’s strong Republican streak in voter registration means the primary winner will easily claim victory in the general election.

Congresswoman Robin Titus (R-Wellington) is leading Congressman Jim Wheeler (R-Minden) in the Republican primary to represent Senate District 17. The rural district includes Churchill, Lyon, Douglas, Mineral, Esmeralda and Nye counties.

Although Wheeler garnered more support in Douglas and Nye counties, Titus — endorsed by the state Senate’s GOP caucus — led the polls in the remaining counties. Still, about half of the votes in Douglas County had yet to be counted by noon Wednesday.

The crowded Republican primary to face incumbent Sen. Marilyn Dondero Loop (D-Las Vegas) in Senate District 8 saw former casino executive and entrepreneur Joey Paulous top the 8-person field with about a quarter of the vote.

Paulous posted a lead of several hundred votes against his opponent Joshua Dowden, a financial services businessman. Jennifer Fawzy, a real estate agent backed by the Senate Republican caucus and several incumbent senators, is in fourth place.

Dondero Loop, who was first elected to the state Senate in 2018, did not face a Democratic primary opponent. The district encompasses parts of Summerlin, including the Peccole Ranch area.

In Senate District 9, Republican Tina Brown is edging out victory over Tina Peetris by a significant lead. Brown has been endorsed by the Senate GOP caucus and will face incumbent Sen. Melanie Scheible (D-Las Vegas) in the general election for control of that southwest Las Vegas district.

A competitive Democratic primary in Henderson’s Senate District 12 saw caucus-backed Julie Pazina win over Clark County School District Administrator Lisa Guzman, who was backed by the school teachers union. ‘State. Pazina, who narrowly lost a bid for the state Senate in 2018, garnered more than half of the vote. The district encompasses large parts of Henderson — a geographic area represented by Republican Keith Pickard, who is not leading this cycle.

On the Republican side, Cherlyn Arrington appears to be winning comfortably against GOP caucus-backed April Arndt, winning about half of the votes in the Republican primary for state Senate District 12. She will face Pazina in the general election.

Incumbent Sen. James Ohrenschall (D-Las Vegas) defeats opponent Jacqueline Alvidrez (a Trump supporter) in the Southern Nevada Senate District 21 Democratic primary with a double-digit lead. Fellow incumbent Fabian Donate (D-Las Vegas) is also on his way to a primary victory over opponent Jack “JT” Absher in State Senate District 10.

In Senate District 2, represented by Sen. Mo Denis (D-Las Vegas), Congressman Edgar Flores (D-Las Vegas) will face Republican Leo Henderson in the general election. Henderson beat his two opponents with almost 40% of the vote.

In Northern Nevada, former Democratic Assemblyman Skip Daly is winning the Democratic open primary for Senate District 13 with nearly two-thirds of the vote so far. The Democratic Senate Caucus-endorsed candidate is ahead of progressive community organizer Nnedi Stephens, who was endorsed by the Nevada State Education Association.

The district was represented by former state senator Julia Ratti (D-Sparks) until she resigned in November, citing a decision to step out of her state’s Senate district boundaries.

If successful, Daly will face the only Republican candidate: retired Air Force Col. Matthew Buehler, who ran for Washoe County Treasurer as a Democrat in 2018 but lost in the election. general.

Assembly

Retired Detective Sergeant Brian Hibbitts is leading a four-way Republican primary in Assembly District 13 that is open following Assemblyman Tom Roberts (R-Las Vegas)’s unsuccessful bid to run Clark County Sheriff. Dental anesthetist Steven DeLisle and far-right candidate Vem Miller follow the frontrunner.

In the district’s Democratic primary, life coach Will Rucker appears to have emerged victorious with nearly half the vote. But Rucker faces an uphill battle in a district that continues to favor Republicans even after the redistricting.

Teachers union-backed educator Selena La Rue Hatch defeated Assembly Democratic caucus-backed veteran Alex Goff in the Democratic primary in Northern Nevada’s Assembly District 25, with nearly two-thirds of the votes.

La Rue Hatch will face conservative author and former Washoe Republican Party Chairman Sam Kumar in the general election. Kumar was endorsed by former Attorney General and Republican Senate candidate Adam Laxalt. Represented by Congresswoman Jill Tolles (R-Reno), who announced in October that she would not run again, the former red riding is now leaning slightly towards blue. It is considered a draw in general elections.

Geologist and natural resources manager Richard “Rich” Delong leads a host of Republican candidates with nearly a third of the vote. He is followed by Kinross Gold chief hydrologist Jay Dixon and emergency physician Greg Juhl.

With no Democrats vying for the seat, Delong will be the district’s next representative.

Washoe County School District Administrator Angie Taylor appears to have sent primary opponent Brian Lee, executive director of the state’s teachers’ union, to the area’s Assembly District Democratic primary. of Reno 27, represented by the Assembly named Teresa Benitez-Thompson (R-Reno). Benitez-Thompson endorsed Taylor.

Taylor won more than two-thirds of the votes. She will face Republican Carmen Ortiz in the general election.

Two Democratic legislative incumbents easily survived primary challenges from candidates spurred by business groups and outside money.

In Henderson Assembly District 29, incumbent Lesley Cohen easily dispatched main challenger Joe Dalia. During the 2021 legislative season, Cohen drew the ire of natural gas utility Southwest Gas through a bill to ditch fossil gas in new construction. The gas utility funded an outside group that produced letters attacking Cohen, while another business-aligned PAC called Nevada Rising also got involved in the race on Dalia’s behalf.

Fellow Democratic incumbent Cecelia Gonzalez also easily beat leading challenger and former court administrator Chuck Short in the Assembly District 16 Democratic primary, despite similar corporate-backed outside support for Short.

Cohen’s general election opponent was still unknown as of midday Wednesday — Assembly Republican Caucus-backed Rhonda Knightly holds a slim lead over primary challenger Natalie Thomas.

Gonzalez will face Jesse “Jake” Holder in the general election, having nearly won more than half the vote in the district’s three-way Republican primary.

Lyon County Commissioner Ken Gray also seemed likely to knock out GOP Assembly caucus-backed candidate Blayne Osborn in the Republican primary for Assembly District 39, with a seat vacated by Republican Congressman Jim Wheeler. The district’s heavy Republican voter registration advantage means that the winner of the primary election will almost certainly win the general election.

Gray, who led the initiative to rename the Lyon County Justice Building after former President Donald Trump, won about 54% of the vote, boosted by a strong performance in Lyon County .

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Campaign finance reports show DC candidates increasing spending https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/campaign-finance-reports-show-dc-candidates-increasing-spending/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 22:13:41 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/campaign-finance-reports-show-dc-candidates-increasing-spending/ Placeholder while loading article actions DC candidates have increased their spending over the past month as candidates make last-minute appeals to voters who have yet to vote, according to the latest round of campaign finance reports due before the June 21 Democratic primary. For the second month in a row, DC mayoral candidate Robert C. […]]]>
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DC candidates have increased their spending over the past month as candidates make last-minute appeals to voters who have yet to vote, according to the latest round of campaign finance reports due before the June 21 Democratic primary.

For the second month in a row, DC mayoral candidate Robert C. White Jr. reported more individual contributions from DC residents than incumbent Mayor Muriel E. Bowser, though she garnered more twice as much as White over the course of their campaigns. In the month to June 10, Bowser brought in about $30,000 from 240 District residents — up from $18,156 during the last reporting period — as well as $15,222 from donors who live outside the District, according to reports. White raised $32,510 from 464 DC residents and $7,716 from non-residents during the same period.

Both campaigns have increased spending significantly since their last reports, which captured campaign activity from April to early May. White’s campaign has spent more than $904,000 since May 11, including about $483,000 on advertising; Bowser’s campaign has spent more than $1.3 million this time, including $500,000 for advertising expenses.

Bowser, however, reports having a lot more cash on hand. He has more than $1.6 million left to close out the period, while White has about $181,000. Both candidates are using the city’s public funding program, which caps individual donations at small dollar amounts while matching donations from city residents 5-1 with taxpayer funds.

A guide to the DC 2022 Democratic primaries

The other two Democratic mayoral candidates, Councilman Trayon White Sr. (D-Ward 8) and former Neighborhood Advisory Commissioner James Butler, who does not use public funding and therefore has a higher limit on individual contributions, had not submitted reports to the Bureau. campaign finance by Monday afternoon. Teat White has requested an extension, OCF spokesman Wesley Williams said.

The majority of candidates for mayor, attorney general and city council opted for the fair election agenda – and in the contest for DC attorney general, the use of public funding emerged as one of the few means by which the three candidates sought to distinguish themselves to voters.

Brian Schwalb, managing partner of Venable, and Ryan Jones, an independent lawyer, opted for the program, unlike Bruce V. Spiva, former managing partner of the law firm Perkins Coie. The most recent fundraising reports show Schwalb received about $21,400 from DC residents and $14,000 from nonresidents.

Schwalb has now raised a total of $1.1 million including public funding, although it has seen a decrease in overall contributions since the last reporting period. Spiva has raised a total of around $423,000 from his campaign – and his most recent report shows he has also lent $535,000 to his own campaign.

Jones has received about $246,000 during his campaign, but has increased his donations from DC residents and non-residents since his last report, receiving $2,523 from residents and $1,112 from non-residents during this reporting period.

In addition to the candidates’ individual campaign coffers, the latest filings also show two education groups pouring more than $1.3 million into the races. The DC Chapter of Democrats for Education Reform — a group that supports charter schools and the city’s current mayoral control system — has spent more than $1 million supporting Bowser, the incumbent president of the DC council Phil Mendelson and Ward 3 candidate Eric Goulet.

The group, which is not allowed to coordinate with individual campaigns, has received significant funding from high-profile national figures, including Alice Walton, daughter of Walmart founder and supporter of charter schools. DC Charter School Action, an independent spending committee, has spent nearly $300,000 so far this election cycle. No other organization, according to campaign finance reports, spent even a fraction of what these groups spent on local elections.

The reports also help show how the races for the DC Council are going in the final stretch before the primary.

DC Elections: Where Do Democratic Attorney General Candidates Stand

In the race for the presidency of the DC Council, Mendelson, who does not use public funding, took more $259,000 since March 11 and $779,464 in total; he has $316,241 in cash. In her campaign to overthrow Mendelson, Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner Erin Palmer reports receiving just under $10,000 in individual contributions over the past month, 95% of donations have come from DC residents. She has over $88,000 in cash to close out her main campaign.

In the increasingly intense race for the Ward 1 council seat, where all three candidates are using public funding, former police officer Salah V. Czapary reports raising more than $11,300 from DC residents in last month, while two-term holder Brianne K. Nadeau raised $10,844. It surpassed it in local donations for two consecutive reporting periods, although Nadeau collected more from non-residents in the last reporting period.

Nadeau and Czapary raised a total of approximately $241,000 and $209,000, respectively, and now have similar amounts of money to close the period. Sabel Harris, who is running on a similar Liberal platform as Nadeau, raised just over $500 from individual donors in the last reporting period and raised a total of around $50,000, including taxpayer funds.

Czapary spent about $122,900 during the reporting period — including just under $72,000 on campaign mailings — representing more than 60% of his total campaign spend. Nearly half of Nadeau’s $200,000 outlay also occurred in the last reporting period, with the lion’s share going to consulting fees.

The reports also help differentiate candidates in the hotly contested Democratic Ward 3 primary. Seven candidates are using public funding; high school student Henry Cohen opted out of fundraising in the race, while former Neighborhood Advisory Commissioner and housing advocate Deirdre Brown uses traditional fundraising and raised about $77,500 during her campaign.

Brianne Nadeau faces heated race for nomination to DC Ward 1 council

Among the Ward 3 candidates participating in public funding, local activist Matthew Frumin is leading the fundraiser with a total of $205,800; he also spent the most, and just like his rival candidates, the majority of his spending took place during the last reporting period.

Monte Monash, a former DC Library board member, ranks second in total revenue with $146,708. She is closely followed by Palisades community leader Tricia Duncan, who won the support of outgoing Ward 3 council member Mary M. Cheh last month, as well as Phil Thomas, chair of the Goulet Democrats and of district 3.

Goulet, who was endorsed by the Washington Post editorial board last month, outperformed all Ward 3 candidates during this reporting period. Rounding out the pack are advisory ward commissioners Ben Bergmann and Beau Finley, who have raised around $99,000 and $106,000 respectively in their campaigns.

In Ward 5, four of the seven candidates had submitted financial reports by Monday afternoon, while Williams said the others had been granted extensions. In the race to become an at-large member of the DC Council, two of the four candidates have requested extensions.

Ahead of November’s general election, three independents running for a seat on the general council also filed reports this week. Newcomer Graham McLaughlin, who presents himself as a business-friendly candidate, has so far edged out incumbent Elissa Silverman, taking home around $185,000 to Silverman’s $165,000, although Silverman has raised more in the last reporting period. Karim Marshall, the third candidate in the race, has raised $14,787 so far.

Perry Stein contributed to this report.

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Congratulations to Dave Barnett; 3 mayoral candidates https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/congratulations-to-dave-barnett-3-mayoral-candidates/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 02:32:45 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/congratulations-to-dave-barnett-3-mayoral-candidates/ A relentless and ruthless COVID 19 and its pernicious offspring have impacted many aspects of daily life that we took for granted before the spring of 2020, including the amount of space available in newspapers to provide the kind of focused forums about readers that are typically found on an Opinion Page. The Record faced […]]]>

A relentless and ruthless COVID 19 and its pernicious offspring have impacted many aspects of daily life that we took for granted before the spring of 2020, including the amount of space available in newspapers to provide the kind of focused forums about readers that are typically found on an Opinion Page. The Record faced such a challenge and reluctantly decided to limit commentary to Sunday editions only – a hurdle in the road which we hope will soon be fully ironed out.

In the meantime, this column, which had previously appeared here for almost seven years, has been resurrected and scheduled to run every other Sunday. It is a privilege that I do not take lightly.

Congratulations, Coach Barnett

First, congratulations to Dave Barnett, longtime baseball coach at Flagler College, for reaching the milestone of 1,000 wins – all at Flagler. He started the 2022 season with 982 coaching wins and finished with 1,007.

I don’t know Dave well, but a few years ago – just before the pandemic came to town and changed our lives – we met for lunch and swapped stories about our time as football players. baseball. Dave was much more successful, so naturally he had more stories to tell. And better stories, to boot.

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4 FIDE presidential candidates https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/4-fide-presidential-candidates/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 13:41:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/4-fide-presidential-candidates/ The FIDE presidential elections, which will be held on August 7, 2022, will be contested by no less than four candidates. This became clear after the FIDE Electoral Commission approved all four ticket nominations on June 7 (in PDF here, which was posted on the FIDE website on June 9). The four approved tickets are […]]]>

The FIDE presidential elections, which will be held on August 7, 2022, will be contested by no less than four candidates. This became clear after the FIDE Electoral Commission approved all four ticket nominations on June 7 (in PDF here, which was posted on the FIDE website on June 9).

The four approved tickets are as follows, with the first name for the president and the second name for the vice-president:

June 7, 2022 (exactly two months before the election) was the deadline for candidates to submit their tickets, which had several requirements. For example, the candidate for the presidency and the one for the vice-presidency cannot belong to the same chess federation. Most importantly, the ticket must be officially endorsed by at least five chess federations from at least four different continents.

Enyonam Sewa Fumey’s post with Stuart Fancy (interviewed here by Chess.com) was declared invalid and rejected because he only had the support of federations from Africa (Burkina Faso, Egypt, Togo, Senegal), Asia (Papua New Guinea) and from America (Haiti) but not from Europe. Fumey quickly published a furious letter about the lack of support from Europe.

Arkady Dvorkovich and Viswanathan Anand

Arkady Dvorkovich and Viswanathan Anand. Photos: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

The Dvorkovich/Anand ticket has been endorsed by Tunisia (Africa), Mexico (America), India (Asia), Cyprus (Europe), Panama (America), Indonesia (Asia), Nigeria (Africa ) and Montenegro (Europe). Having the maximum number of supporting federations allowed for a ticket (eight) can be seen as a sign of confidence, and according to the Electoral Commission, this ticket also received other approvals, communicated directly by the member federations. It’s safe to say that Dvorkovich enters the race as a favorite.

The FIDE president announced on April 1, 2022 at a press conference in New Delhi that he would run for a second term with Anand as his right-hand man. Dvorkovich is the only candidate to have already announced several names of his team (not yet required at this stage): Joran Aulin-Jansson (Norway), Zhu Chen (Qatar) and Mahir Mammedov (Azerbaijan).

Andrii Baryshpolets and Peter-Heine Nielsen

Andrii Baryshpolets Peter Heine Nielsen
Andrii Baryshpolets (photo: Baryshpolets Twitter) and Peter Heine Nielsen (photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com).

The Baryshpolets/Nielsen ticket has been approved by South Sudan (Africa), Curaçao (America), New Zealand (Asia), England (Europe), Lithuania (Europe), Netherlands (Europe) and Norway (Europe). The Electoral Commission notes that a day after backing this ticket, South Sudan signed an endorsement for Dvorkovich/Anand but that a federation “is only allowed to back one candidate for each elected position and no approval cannot be withdrawn once approved and communicated”.

Baryshpolets, a 31-year-old Ukrainian grandmaster living in the United States, announced his candidacy on May 20 this year. In his official statement, he notes that FIDE is still struggling with its reputation and that, given the war in Ukraine, it is important to continue without a former Russian politician as president and to avoid what he describes such as “FIDE’s political and financial dependence on the Russian government.”

Nielsen for Vice President is interesting from different angles. The 49-year-old Danish grandmaster was part of Anand’s team as a second, and now the two are pitted against each other having the same roles. Nielsen has also recently been one of FIDE’s most vocal critics on social media.

Inalbek Cheripov and Lewis Ncube

Inalbek Cheripov Lewis Ncube
Inalbek Cheripov (photo: Wikipedia) and Lewis Ncube (photo: FIDE).

The Cheripov/Ncube ticket has been endorsed by Sierra Leone (Africa), Barbados (America), Timor Leste (Asia), Ukraine (Europe) and Zambia (Africa). This post is somewhat obscure, in the sense that Cheripov is a rather unknown personality in the chess world, and there is little to be found about him on the internet.

Born in Grozny, Chechnya, 50-year-old Cheripov (whose name is also spelled Inal Sheripov or Sherip) lived in California and now resides in Belgium. He had a career as a filmmaker, producer and screenwriter, and won several awards.

In 2017, Cheripov founded the international nonprofit World Chess Culture, which is currently developing an interactive chess museum. The museum plans to open in 2024 for the 100th anniversary of the founding of FIDE.

Ncube is a seasoned chess politician who served under former FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov. In 2018, he was narrowly re-elected as President of the African Chess Confederation.

Ukraine’s support for this post is noteworthy, given that a Ukrainian grandmaster is conducting another post. According to Baryshpolets, the president of the Ukrainian Chess Federation, Victor Kapustin, acted on his own and without consulting the rest of the board.

Bachar Kouatly and Ian Wilkinson

Bachar Kouatly Ian Wilkinson
Bachar Kouatly (photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com) and Ian Wilkinson (photo: Ian Wilkinson Twitter).

The Kouatly/Wilkinson ticket has been approved by Congo (Africa), Jamaica (America), Australia (Asia), Monaco (Europe), Saint Kitts and Nevis (America) and Grenada (America).

Kouatly, 64, is the most experienced chess politician among the candidates. In 1990 he became vice-president of the Grandmaster Chess Association, and in the mid-1990s he almost became president of FIDE himself.

In 1994 Kouatly, backed by GM Anatoly Karpov, ran against incumbent President Florencio Campomanes, backed by GM Garry Kasparov. Campomanes won. A year later, Campomanes’ position became untenable and it was Ilyumzhinov who won the election with Kouatly as one of the two vice presidents.

Kouatly became the owner and editor-in-chief of the famous French magazine Chess Europe in 1997. In 2016 he was elected president of the French Chess Federation, and since 2018 he has been vice-president under Dvorkovich. Wilkinson is a longtime president of the Jamaica Chess Federation and an honorary vice president under Dvorkovich.

FIDE presidential elections, which will be held on August 7, 2022, are held every four years. He is part of the General Assembly, which will be held alongside the Olympiad in Chennai, India. Delegates from the nearly 200 member federations will vote and decide who will lead the International Chess Federation for the next four years.

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SAD 44 administrators, candidates for sheriff and House and Senate seats in Tuesday’s ballot https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/sad-44-administrators-candidates-for-sheriff-and-house-and-senate-seats-in-tuesdays-ballot/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/sad-44-administrators-candidates-for-sheriff-and-house-and-senate-seats-in-tuesdays-ballot/ Primary elections for Maine House and Senate candidates and elections for selected local committees and the SAD 44 Board of Directors will all take place on Tuesday, June 14 at municipal offices and Legion halls in the area of Bethel. In Bethel, the candidates for two open three-year terms for the leadership of SAD 44 […]]]>

Primary elections for Maine House and Senate candidates and elections for selected local committees and the SAD 44 Board of Directors will all take place on Tuesday, June 14 at municipal offices and Legion halls in the area of Bethel.

In Bethel, the candidates for two open three-year terms for the leadership of SAD 44 are, in order of appearance on the ballot, Michael Clark-Pelletier, Scott Cole, Mark Hutchins and David Jones.

Jones is the sole starter in the squad.

There are two vacancies on the Select Committee, each for a three-year term.

Incumbents Michele Varuolo Cole and Neil Scanlon are both seeking re-election, and Frank Delduca, Meryl Kelly and Christopher Tyler have joined the race to challenge the two incumbents for those seats.

There are two openings for the evaluator.

Scanlon, who is a tenured assessor, is seeking re-election to the position and is uncontested. The other will be completed by a written applicant.

Voting will take place at the American Legion, 85 Vernon St., from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

In Newry, SAD 44 trustees Amy Henley and David Bartlett are each seeking re-election for a three-year term. Neither face challengers.

Gary Wight, who is currently chairman of the Select Board, is seeking re-election and is uncontested.

There will be three questions on the ballot, all related to ordinances.

They are:

Should an ordinance titled “An Ordinance Amending the United Development Review Ordinance for the Town of Newry, Maine” be enacted?

Should an ordinance titled “An Ordinance to Amend the Town of Newry Building Code Ordinance” be enacted?

Should an ordinance titled “An Ordinance Amending the Shoreland Zoning Map of the Town of Newry, Maine” be enacted?

Voting will take place at the municipal office, 422 Bear River Road, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

In Greenwood, outgoing SAD 44 director Erin Cooley is seeking re-election and is challenged by Destiny Hughes for a three-year term.

There are no other items on the ballot.

Voting will take place at the municipal office, 593 Gore Road, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

And, in Woodstock, outgoing SAD 44 director Marcy Winslow is unchallenged in her bid for re-election to a three-year term.

Voting will take place at the municipal office from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

At the county level, Republican Richard Murray of Fryeburg is a written candidate challenging Oxford County Sheriff Christopher Wainwright of Canton for the office of sheriff. Murray is currently employed as a Corporal in the Sheriff’s Office; Wainwright was elected sheriff in 2018 and has worked in the department for more than 30 years.

There are two candidates up for election to serve as district attorney for Oxford, Androscoggin and Franklin counties. They are current Assistant District Attorney Neil McLean Jr., who is a Turner Republican, and attorney Edward Rabasco Jr., a Democrat from Poland, who launched a write-in campaign last week for the primary on June 14 in order to secure a place on the ballot for the November general election. The two will face off in November.

Maine’s House and Senate seats were all renamed following a redistricting after the 2020 census,

What was Home District 117 is now District 78, and what was known as Senate District 18 is now District 19.

House District 78

Rep. Frances Head, who represented what was once known as House District 117, left Maine House.

The Republican candidate for that seat is Josanne Dolloff of Milton Plantation, who is currently serving her second term as a representative for District 115, serving on the Veterans Affairs and Legal Affairs and Leave Committees.

The Democratic candidate for the District 78 seat is David Thurston of Bethel.

Neither candidate is contested in the primaries, meaning the two will face off for the Senate seat on Tuesday, November 8.

Senate District 19

Lisa Keim, a Republican from Rumford, was elected in 2016 to represent what was known as District 18 and recently served on government and judicial oversight committees.

Bethel’s Timothy Carter is the Democratic candidate for that seat. A former member of the Maine House of Representatives, he served on the Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry Committee.

Like the House candidates, neither is contested in the primary and will face off for the Senate seat in November.

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