Democratic Candidate – Shaughnessy For Congress http://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 14:25:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4.png Democratic Candidate – Shaughnessy For Congress http://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ 32 32 Abrams loses to Kemp a second time – The Hilltop https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/abrams-loses-to-kemp-a-second-time-the-hilltop/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 14:25:09 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/abrams-loses-to-kemp-a-second-time-the-hilltop/ Stacey Abrams loses her rematch against Republican Governor Brian Kemp. Photo courtesy of @staceyabrams Instagram Republican Gov. Brian Kemp will retain his gubernatorial seat following a win over two-time Democratic nominee Stacey Abrams. Georgia Democrats were outmatched by Republican voters despite increased efforts and funding to help Abrams make state history. Supporters came out in […]]]>
Stacey Abrams loses her rematch against Republican Governor Brian Kemp. Photo courtesy of @staceyabrams Instagram

Republican Gov. Brian Kemp will retain his gubernatorial seat following a win over two-time Democratic nominee Stacey Abrams. Georgia Democrats were outmatched by Republican voters despite increased efforts and funding to help Abrams make state history.

Supporters came out in record numbers for his 2018 gubernatorial campaign, where Abrams helped mobilize historically marginalized groups, increasing voter turnout in Latino, Black and Asian communities. However, this time around Abrams has trailed Kemp in the polls by at least 5% for the majority of the race, even though his campaign has largely focused on registering new voters of color instead of influencing. white moderates.

The Democratic candidate entered this race more hopeful than the last as she championed a major campaign to register and activate more than 800,000 new voters in Georgia. The combined efforts of Abram’s organizations When Fair Fight and the New Georgia Project helped the state “go blue” in the 2020 presidential election, where current President Joe Biden became the first Democratic candidate to win the state in 28 years.

Following her second loss, the Democratic challenger took to Twitter to thank her supporters.

“I know that throughout this campaign the stories of Georgians have been told and lives have been changed because of what we have done together. It is not about politics or even politics. It has always been about people. Fair fights never end. Let’s keep doing it,” Abrams tweeted.

While areas like Atlanta, Savannah, Macon and Athens showed overwhelming support for Abrams, they outnumbered Republican voters. Abrams has also made big endorsements by securing endorsements from former President Barack Obama, playwright Lin Manuel-Miranda, Sen. Corey Booker, DN.J., and TV personality and businesswoman Oprah Winfrey. .

Throughout the campaign, a big concern in the election was Abram’s approval rating among black men. In October, Bloomberg News reported that a third of black men in Georgia who were registered to vote had not participated in the previous three elections.

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When Abrams lost in 2018, Governor Kemp won by 55,000 votes. After the election, exit polls reported that 97% of black women voted for Abrams, as did 88% of black men. Therefore, this nine point difference between male and female voters amounted to 120,000 votes.

In the end, 1.8 million Georgians said they wanted Abrams as governor, compared to 2.1 million who decided Kemp should stay in office. Georgia voters saw the most expensive gubernatorial campaign yet, with Abrams raising $85 million to Kemp’s $60 million.

Howard University students, like Thomas McDaniel, a sophomore in community development at McDonough, Georgia, expressed disappointment with the outcome of the race.

“Historically, Georgia has shown that it is not yet ready for such an eloquent African-American woman to rule the disunited state. Even with record voter turnout, we are still at a disadvantage when it comes to Georgia’s population of biased voters tied to diverse communities and backgrounds,” McDaniel said.

Abrams, who was the first black woman to become a major party gubernatorial candidate in the United States and was seen as one of Biden’s top contenders for vice president, no longer holds office. official public service.

“But looking at the results tonight, we’ve made sure that Stacey Abrams won’t be our governor or your next president,” Kemp told supporters on election night from his election headquarters in Cobb County.

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Copy edited by Alana Matthew

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Republicans’ problems run deeper than candidate quality https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/republicans-problems-run-deeper-than-candidate-quality/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 18:45:57 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/republicans-problems-run-deeper-than-candidate-quality/ Comment this story Comment Is it Dr. Mehmet Oz’s fault that the “red wave” expected by many Republicans did not materialize on Election Day? Did the Pennsylvania Senate candidate violate the doctor’s Hippocratic oath — “first, do no harm” — by inflicting serious damage to his own party’s electoral fortunes? One might think so, given […]]]>

Comment

Is it Dr. Mehmet Oz’s fault that the “red wave” expected by many Republicans did not materialize on Election Day? Did the Pennsylvania Senate candidate violate the doctor’s Hippocratic oath — “first, do no harm” — by inflicting serious damage to his own party’s electoral fortunes?

One might think so, given the content of many post-election analyses. One of the main storylines of this year’s campaign depicted a dramatic tension between a fundamentally favorable national climate for the Republican Party on the one hand, and on the other, a weak list of individual candidates imposed on GOP leaders by misguided primary voters.

Oz, who was easy to think of as a dabbling celebrity suddenly parachuting into politics — and the state of Pennsylvania — for that matter, has become perhaps the most frequently cited example of Republican candidate recruiting problems. But fellow Senate candidates Herschel Walker of Georgia, Blake Masters of Arizona and Don Bolduc of New Hampshire, as well as gubernatorial candidates like Doug Mastriano in Pennsylvania and Tudor Dixon in Michigan, struck political analysts as imperfect flag bearers for the Republican Party.

While candidate shortcomings appear to have affected final results in several key races, Republicans’ disappointing performances in both polls cannot be fully explained by the shortcomings of a few specific candidates. Instead, Republicans suffered from a tainted national image that hurt party candidates regardless of their political skill.

By historical standards, the most surprising outcome of the 2022 election was the unusually modest partisan swing in the House of Representatives. Senate and gubernatorial elections have traditionally been less predictable, but the president’s partisan allies almost always lose House seats — sometimes dozens — midterm. Since World War II, the move to the opposition party has averaged 26 seats and 7 points in the national popular vote. When the president’s approval rating is less than 50%, the expected change is even greater.

While the votes are still being counted, it’s clear House Democrats suffered a small fraction of the 40-seat loss suffered by Republicans in 2018, even though President Joe Biden, whose Jobs approval rating hovers around 41%, is slightly less popular today than Donald Trump (42%) was at the same point in his presidency.

Yet this asymmetry cannot be fully explained by pointing to a poor set of Republican House candidates. A few of this year’s nominees were controversial or scandal-ridden, but many others were just typical, unimpeachable politicians who nonetheless struggled to conquer battleground districts.

Republicans also failed to establish a consistent advantage on what’s known as the generic ballot, a standard poll question that simply asks voters whether they plan to vote Democratic or Republican, or which party they prefer to control the Congress, without mentioning the names of the candidates. If there were a significant number of Americans who were generally inclined to support Republicans but who balked at a specific unattractive candidate, we would likely have observed a greater advantage for the GOP on the generic ballot than in the actual voting results.

Instead, final pre-election polls found a Republican advantage nationwide of 1 percentage point on the generic ballot, while the popular vote in the National House is likely to favor Republicans by a slight margin. bigger.

The Republicans’ inability to translate an unpopular Democratic president and an unstable economic climate into a clear electoral advantage suggests the party was burdened with a tarnished national reputation.

Voters who expressed dissatisfaction with the state of the nation under Democratic rule did not necessarily believe that Republicans offered better solutions to their problems. It’s very possible that the GOP’s current emphasis on cultural populism has left it with less credibility to address Americans’ economic concerns. And the unpopular Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade not only energized an angry Democratic base, but also worried moderate voters that Republicans would impose strict abortion bans if sworn in to power at the federal and federal levels. state.

Yes, Dr. Oz and his fellow untested neophytes weren’t much help at their party this year. But it’s easy to blame the unfortunate outcome on individual scapegoats. Instead, they should look at the set of deeper challenges that have prevented the GOP from enjoying the usual mid-term outparty bounce.

Yet no disappointment is permanent in our highly competitive era. The country and the government remain tightly divided – and the next election campaign is about to begin.

More from Bloomberg Opinion:

• Biden must not waste Lame-Duck session: Jonathan Bernstein

• Why Democrats did better than expected: Matthew Yglesias

• Republicans can’t stop another round of spending in 2023: Conor Sen

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Editorial Board or of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

David A. Hopkins is associate professor of political science at Boston College and author of “Red Fighting Blue: How Geography and Electoral Rules Polarize American Politics.”

More stories like this are available at bloomberg.com/opinion

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Who is Adam Frisch, the man who confronts Lauren Boebert in the 3rd arrondissement https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/who-is-adam-frisch-the-man-who-confronts-lauren-boebert-in-the-3rd-arrondissement/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 17:54:32 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/who-is-adam-frisch-the-man-who-confronts-lauren-boebert-in-the-3rd-arrondissement/ Adam Frisch, the Democratic candidate for the 3rd congressional district, addresses election night at Belly Up in downtown Aspen on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022. (Kelsey Brunner/Special to The Colorado Sun) ASPEN — Win or lose, Democrat Adam Frisch shocked Republican U.S. Representative Lauren Boebert and the National Democratic establishment that gave him little […]]]>
Adam Frisch, the Democratic candidate for the 3rd congressional district, addresses election night at Belly Up in downtown Aspen on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022. (Kelsey Brunner/Special to The Colorado Sun)
Colorado Election News and Results

ASPEN — Win or lose, Democrat Adam Frisch shocked Republican U.S. Representative Lauren Boebert and the National Democratic establishment that gave him little chance of succeeding in Tuesday’s election.

Driving thousands of miles through a district the size of Mississippi, his goal was to meet voters in person and overcome the stigma of being an Aspen millionaire. The race in the 3rd congressional district was still too close to report on Wednesday, but Frisch held a narrow lead in a district that was widely seen as favoring Republicans.

Frisch, a former currency trader whose only political experience was serving on the Aspen City Council, sought to argue that he was a moderate Democrat who would focus on western Colorado and not be part of what he calls the DC Circus.

“I’m a calm, cool, poised person who’s passionate about why I’m doing this and what I believe in. And people just want skill and seriousness,” he told the Colorado Sun then. that his watch party began Tuesday night in downtown Aspen. “The line I used that resonated the most was that people just want the circus to stop and I saw a lot of heads up and down, even when I was in pretty Republican areas.

“Most people, herders and farmers are pragmatic,” he said. “They don’t want the circus. They want someone to focus on them, their business and their community.

Frisch, 55, served two four-year terms on the Aspen City Council beginning in 2011 after failing three years earlier. In March 2019 he lost in his bid to become mayor, finishing third in the four-way race, and said he was going to take a break and reset.

Frisch came out of the pandemic looking for more and frustrated with Boebert’s antics. He announced his Democratic candidacy for the district in February and immediately began canvassing the vast district, which covers the entire West Slope and parts of southern Colorado, including Pueblo.

Since then he has traveled over 23,000 miles and attended hundreds of community events and meetups. He said on Tuesday he has been home about seven days in the past seven months.

Adam Frisch stands among the supporters.
Adam Frisch, the Democratic candidate for the 3rd congressional district, stands with friends and election night attendees as incumbent Lauren Boebert addresses supporters live on her own watch party Tuesday. (Kelsey Brunner/Special for The Colorado Sun)

After winning the June primary, beating Sol Sandoval, a Democratic activist from Pueblo, by less than 300 votes, Frisch and his team embarked on another massive roadtrip.

He seized Pueblo and Mesa counties, the two largest population centers in the 27-county district. But he knew it would take more than that.

Frisch needed to stand before rural voters and let them know his roots, he said, and not just be the Liberal candidate for the glitzy mountain enclave of Aspen. His family’s heritage includes ranching; he had only to inform the voters.

“I just needed to get over the mountain town skepticism, which is totally fair, especially coming from this town,” he told the Colorado Sun on Tuesday night. “I just had to get in front of people. I always knew two or three times the number of voters we need aren’t Democrats who don’t want to vote for her it’s just to convince them that I was the safe enough choice to make them cross the street, if you want. ”

During his Tuesday afternoon stop in Grand Junction, Frisch told The Sun he took a page from former U.S. Representative Scott Tipton, who in 2010 ousted three-term Democrat John Salazar by actively stepping out and meeting people. Boebert upset Tipton to win the seat in 2020, but some voters are now complaining that she doesn’t interact much with the public.

On a recent trip to Alamosa, Frisch said people who came to him expressed surprise that he was talking to them or answering questions because Boebert hadn’t when she was in the area. .

“I think people saw a certain authenticity in me and a pretty good understanding of the issues and they got a chance to learn a lot more about my rural background,” he said on Tuesday evening, awaiting first results.

Frisch was born in Montana on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. When he was 5, the family moved to Minnesota.

Her father, Mel, was an obstetrician-gynecologist who later worked for Planned Parenthood before retiring. Her parents now live in Arizona and made the trip to Aspen for the watch party, along with one of her three younger sisters.

Adam Frisch sits next to his parents as his mother enthusiastically brushes her hand against his cheek.
Patti Frisch touches the face of her son Adam Frisch while watching the updated election results alongside Mel Frisch. (Kelsey Brunner, Special for The Colorado Sun)

While in high school in Minneapolis, he decided he wanted to go to college in Colorado and hoped to become a professional skier. He went to CU but an injury cut short his pro-athlete dream. He got his bachelor’s degree in economics in 1990 and went to New York.

He got a job as a currency trader and did it for over a decade before moving back to Colorado. Frisch made his fortune in New York and met his wife, Katie, who was an investment banker.

The couple, who have two children, moved to Aspen in 2003 and soon became involved in community issues. He first served and chaired the Pitkin County Financial Advisory Board for six years, then in 2009 began working with the Aspen-Pitkin County Housing Authority, which administers the Affordable Housing Program in the region. Its main objective was to find solutions for homeowners associations that have capital reserve fund problems.

In 2008, he lost in his first run for Aspen City Council, but returned three years later to win his first of two terms.

Katie Frisch was elected to the Aspen School District Council in 2019 and is now its Chairperson. Their son, Felix, is a junior at Aspen High School and was on the road with his father for much of the summer.

In the last 11 days leading up to the election, Adam and Felix covered 3,300 miles and made 102 stops.

On the road, he was able to come into contact with herders and farmers in the district because of his family’s Western history. His great-grandfather started a cattle trading business, and one of Frisch’s cousins ​​still runs it.

That, he said, and his tempered personality began to appeal to more conservative voters who were looking for someone to represent them and not someone daring for attention.

After years of stability with Tipton winning five times without much competition, the 3rd Congressional District has been a bit of a mystery in the past two elections. No one has seen Boebert beat the longtime Rep in the 2020 Republican primary.

During her two years in Washington, Boebert made a name for herself by being brash, stoking partisanship and airing her contempt for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

But DC Democratic leaders believed Boebert’s style would still resonate with voters in the 3rd District, and the National Party did not pour money into Frisch’s campaign. He said Tuesday night that he hadn’t gotten much attention from the party or the national media in the past few months, but that suddenly changed.

“People I’ve tried to harass for months and months are finally returning my phone calls,” he said Tuesday night. “We have certainly proven a point on some level that taking the high road, being positive, building a coalition, not disrespecting a group of voters and working really, really, really hard with a group of people who are really, really great is a way to win.”

Adam Frisch looks at a screen displaying the election results.
Adam Frisch, the Democratic candidate for the 3rd congressional district, takes a look at the early election results that threw him ahead of incumbent Lauren Boebert. (Kelsey Brunner/Special for The Colorado Sun)

He reported raising nearly $159,000 from donors giving $1,000 or more after Oct. 19. Boebert raised $67,000 from major donors during the same period.

Nationally, two new Democratic super PACs threw some money at him. Colorado United PAC spent $290,000 and People for Good Sense spent $273,000 on TV, radio and digital advertising in the past month.

Colorado United PAC received $175,000 from PAC founder John Powers of Boulder, who also founded the Alliance Center in Denver, home to several progressive groups. The PAC also received $100,000 from Denver investor John S. Buckley Jr.

People for Good Sense founder and Aspen investor Adam Lewis donated $100,000 and LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman donated $50,000.

Frisch would be the first Democrat to hold the seat since Salazar, who served the district for three terms beginning in 2004 before losing to Tipton in the 2010 election.

This is a developing story that will be updated.

Sun reporter Sandra Fish contributed to this report.

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A look at the candidates vying for Ohio’s U.S. Senate seat https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/a-look-at-the-candidates-vying-for-ohios-u-s-senate-seat/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 22:31:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/a-look-at-the-candidates-vying-for-ohios-u-s-senate-seat/ CINCINNATI (WXIX) — The race for the U.S. Senate seat from Ohio was one of the most talked about campaigns as two candidates continued their campaign coverage across Ohio throughout the weekend. Democratic candidate Tim Ryan and Republican candidate JD Vance are running for the vacant US Senate seat that was once held by Rob […]]]>

CINCINNATI (WXIX) — The race for the U.S. Senate seat from Ohio was one of the most talked about campaigns as two candidates continued their campaign coverage across Ohio throughout the weekend.

Democratic candidate Tim Ryan and Republican candidate JD Vance are running for the vacant US Senate seat that was once held by Rob Portman.

As Election Day approaches, it is important to know the candidates’ platforms, as well as what they stand for.

JD Vance

A Middletown native who calls himself a “conservative outsider.”

Vance wants to reign in what he says is “unnecessary” government spending, which he hopes will help bring inflation under control.

Vance’s website says he advocates for energy independence through energy policies that put American consumers first.

He also says he wants to restore America’s manufacturing base instead of allowing jobs to be shipped overseas.

MORE: “Ohio Midterm Election: A Guide for Voters”

Tim Ryan

Democratic candidate Tim Ryan grew up just outside of Youngstown, Ohio.

Ryan says he is focused on advocating for working families in Ohio.

His campaign website says he also wants more jobs to come back to Ohio and will do so by opposing harmful trade policies that allow companies to ship jobs from Ohio to Ohio. ‘foreign.

Ryan has campaigned to make big infrastructure investments that he hopes will revitalize manufacturing in Ohio.

It also focuses on investing in affordable health care by expanding Medicare.

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Dad of Democratic State House candidate says his son is lying about military service https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/dad-of-democratic-state-house-candidate-says-his-son-is-lying-about-military-service/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 10:17:48 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/dad-of-democratic-state-house-candidate-says-his-son-is-lying-about-military-service/ A Democratic candidate for State House in Washington is embroiled in an ongoing dispute with his family over the veracity of his military service. The father of Clyde Shavers, the Democratic candidate for Washington state’s 10th legislative district, claims in a newly published letter that his son lied about his US Navy service details, according […]]]>

A Democratic candidate for State House in Washington is embroiled in an ongoing dispute with his family over the veracity of his military service.

The father of Clyde Shavers, the Democratic candidate for Washington state’s 10th legislative district, claims in a newly published letter that his son lied about his US Navy service details, according to local media outlet Herald Net.

Clyde Shavers ran on a rig emphasizing his service in the US Navy, claiming he was set up as a nuclear submarine office – a position that requires a large amount of training and three separate courses.

“Clyde was never a submarine officer, not even a day,” wrote Brett Shavers.

DEEP BLUE WASHINGTON NO LONGER A SENATE LOCKDOWN FOR DEMOCRATS: ‘THE LARGE IS REAL’

Photo courtesy of the Elect Clyde Shavers website media gallery
(Elect Clyde razors)

Brett Shavers, a former Marine, went on to dismiss any notion that his son proudly served in the military, going so far as to say that Clyde Shavers had a “contempt” for enlisted servicemen.

“Clyde has nothing but contempt for the military. I’ve seen Clyde’s use of veteran status widely used as a seal of honor and integrity, even though he or his campaign continually use the phrase ‘navy son’ for his credibility,” Brett Shavers wrote.

WASHINGTON AND OREGON VOTERS SAY ABORTION AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING AMONG ELECTORAL PRIORITIES

He continued, “There are no words I have that could come close to Clyde’s negative view of the military, his disdain for enlisted servicemen and his revulsion to wear uniform.”

Brett Shavers reportedly sent the signed letter Sunday to the campaign of Greg Gilday – Clyde’s Republican opponent. The text was then published in local media, including the Daily Herald and the Herald Net.

Photo courtesy of the Elect Clyde Shavers website media gallery

Photo courtesy of the Elect Clyde Shavers website media gallery
(Elect Clyde razors)

WASHINGTON SENATE: MURRAY CALLS FOR GUN CONTROL AFTER ACCUSED OF BEING SOFT ON CRIME DURING DEBATE

Brett Shavers went on to claim in his letter that his son was also only tied to the 10th Legislative District by renting a bed and breakfast in the area.

He also claims that Clyde Shavers embellished his family history and legal credentials.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Clyde Shavers flatly denied his father’s claims, saying the letter was “inaccurate” and “all about politics”.

“His political letter is inaccurate and personally very painful to me as a son,” Shavers said of his father’s claims. “To be clear, this letter is all about politics.”

He continued, “This is the kind of politics that tears families and communities apart, and my campaign is about healing and moving forward.”

Fox News Digital has reached out to Clyde Shavers and Brett Shavers for comment.

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Live Updates: US Midterm Election and Early Voting News https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/live-updates-us-midterm-election-and-early-voting-news/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 22:54:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/live-updates-us-midterm-election-and-early-voting-news/ A voter receives an “I Voted” sticker after voting on the first day of in-person early voting in Las Vegas, Nevada, October 22. David Becker/Getty Images It’s pretty clear from the polls that Senate control will likely boil down to four races: Arizona, Georgia, Nevada and Pennsylvania. The calculation is simple. Democrats must win three […]]]>

It’s pretty clear from the polls that Senate control will likely boil down to four races: Arizona, Georgia, Nevada and Pennsylvania.

The calculation is simple. Democrats must win three of those four races to retain control of the Senate. For the Republicans, it’s a slightly easier climb because they only need to win two of those four races.

But despite the ease of the equation, solving it is anything but easy. All of these races are well within the margin of error. Also, the states aren’t that similar demographically, which means it’s plausible that any late move or polling error could affect the states in different ways. Each state also has unique issues that affect them.

Arizona, is the easiest breed to understand. Democrats have won the last two Senate races in the state, having won none since 1988. They are fueled by increasingly strong showings in suburban Phoenix among white college-educated voters and a reliable Hispanic base. They are also aided by one of the largest Native American populations in the country.

Democratic Sen. Mark Kelly has not trailed in any publicly released polls. Her edge has dwindled in some recent surveys, though many of them come from outfits that don’t meet CNN’s publishing standards.

On average, Kelly gained about 3 points over Republican Blake Masters. A New York Times/Siena College poll released Monday gave Kelly a 6-point lead over Masters.

The problem for the masters is quite simple: his net preference rating (favorable – unfavorable) is underwater. Unpopular Republican candidates are an issue that has plagued Republicans at all levels. Meanwhile, Kelly’s net preference (and approval rating) was positive.

This allowed Kelly to overcome President Joe Biden’s own unpopularity in the state.

Nevada, is most favorable to the Republicans. The Times poll and the average have the race tied between Democratic Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto and Republican Adam Laxalt.

Nevada seemed to be leaning towards the Democrats 10 years ago, after Barack Obama easily won it in two consecutive elections. Republicans have lost the last two state presidential elections by shrinking margins, including a 2.4-point loss in 2020.

The Republicans were helped by a move toward them among Hispanics, as well as a large base of white voters without a college degree. The state’s tourism economic base was hit during the Covid-19 pandemic, when National Democrats were much more likely to push for Covid precautions.

Cortez Masto, unlike Kelly, hasn’t carved out a popularity base, according to the polls.

The last two states of Senate mathematics are the most difficult to understand. Georgia and Pennsylvania couldn’t be more different when it comes to demographic calculations.

Pennsylvania is a swinging Great Lakes state in which Democrats must win over a good share of white voters without a college degree. It’s a group that shuns Democrats, which is why Hillary Clinton in 2016 became the first Democratic presidential candidate to lose the state since Michael Dukakis in 1988.

If border issues play an outsized role in a state like Arizona and a recovering gambling industry is key in Nevada, the big non-inflation story in Pennsylvania is the crime. Philadelphia, the most populous city in the state, has seen its crime rate rise in recent years.

Republican Mehmet Oz has used the crime issue to shut down what was once a big advantage for Democrat John Fetterman in the Senate race.

Fetterman, however, seemed to persevere, despite a stroke that left him off the track for a while. He continues to keep a small lead of around 2 to 3 points. The Times gave Fetterman 6 points, though much of that poll was taken before a debate last week that many saw as weak for him.

Additionally, Republicans have tended to outperform their final poll in recent cycles.

Oz, for his part, had a negative net preference rating throughout the campaign, as he had to fight accusations of being a baggage handler.

Georgia is unique among the four races in that the candidate with the most votes needs a majority to win. Otherwise, there will be a second round in December.

At this point, a runoff seems quite plausible. Democratic Senator Raphael Warnock and Republican Herschel Walker are in a close race. None of them come close to 50% in the polls average, with libertarian Chase Oliver getting around 3% of the vote.

Runoff potential isn’t the only thing that makes Georgia unique. Peach State has, by far, the largest black population of any of these pivotal races. Democrats have made a comeback in this Deep South state due to a growing black population and the move toward Democrats among white college-educated voters in the Atlanta area.

In the end, Georgia could come down to the same thing that’s been happening in most swing states this year: a Republican nominee in Walker sporting a negative net preference rating against the backdrop of a deeply unpopular president.

Whichever matters most to the rare swing voter will likely decide who wins in Georgia and who takes control of the Senate.

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Rob Garcia, Democratic candidate for the 71st district of the West Virginia House of Delegates | VM News https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/rob-garcia-democratic-candidate-for-the-71st-district-of-the-west-virginia-house-of-delegates-vm-news/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/rob-garcia-democratic-candidate-for-the-71st-district-of-the-west-virginia-house-of-delegates-vm-news/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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Pennsylvania dairy farmers call for candidates who will reduce environmental regulations https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/pennsylvania-dairy-farmers-call-for-candidates-who-will-reduce-environmental-regulations/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/pennsylvania-dairy-farmers-call-for-candidates-who-will-reduce-environmental-regulations/ Every day at Schrack Farms in Loganton, Pennsylvania, Jim Harbach tends to his 1,300 dairy cows. The farm has been in his family for nearly 40 years and he manages it alongside members of his wife’s family. Although his business isn’t struggling yet, Harbach has recently noticed that rising operating costs are affecting farms across […]]]>

Every day at Schrack Farms in Loganton, Pennsylvania, Jim Harbach tends to his 1,300 dairy cows. The farm has been in his family for nearly 40 years and he manages it alongside members of his wife’s family. Although his business isn’t struggling yet, Harbach has recently noticed that rising operating costs are affecting farms across the region.

Costs for fuel, fertilizer and repairing vehicles and milking equipment have all increased over the past year, he said. Farmers, he said, have two options in such a situation: they can take on more debt or they can buy less feed and fertilizer, leading to lower yields. “That’s probably our biggest challenge,” he said. Like many Pennsylvania dairy farmers, Harbach would also like federal and state governments to relax environmental rules that add to his financial burdens.

In the midterm elections this fall, he and other Pennsylvania dairy farmers will have the opportunity to choose a new governor and senator. While farmers hope for a rollback on government regulations, few candidates have presented detailed plans for the agricultural sector or any other proposals that will help dairy farmers vote meaningfully on their work. This may be because less than 1% of Pennsylvanians work for the agriculture industry, giving the sector less political clout.

In the Senate race, for example, neither the Democratic candidate, John Fetterman, nor the Republican candidate, Mehmet Oz, have defined measures to help farmers. According to Fetterman’s campaign website, he supports the right of farmers to repair their own equipment as they see fit, wants “small farmers” to have a “fair opportunity” and believes that choosing between protecting the environment and job creation in the sector is a “false choice.

The Oz campaign website makes no mention of farming or dairying. Neither campaign responded to requests for comment.

According to the Center for Dairy Excellence, a state dairy industry group, Pennsylvania ranks eighth nationally for milk production. Unlike operations in other dairy-producing states like California, farms in Pennsylvania tend to be a bit smaller. Harbach’s farm is medium-sized compared to others in the state, he notes. But like other producers, he is always looking to improve his results.

John Dotter, whose dairy farm in Mill Hall, Pennsylvania, milks about 1,200 cows, is also worried about rising costs. More than that, however, he finds the state’s approach to managing transportation during the winter months frustrating. When snowstorms hit, major highways may be closed as part of a state Department of Transportation policy on commercial motor vehicles operating in such conditions.

Dotter said these stops increase the time it takes to transport milk. Since milk is a perishable product, he adds, delays can reduce revenue. Harbach, too, found it infuriating: “This micromanagement of our transportation system has gotten out of hand,” he said.

Dotter is also fed up with a state Department of Environmental Protection requirement that he write and implement a nutrient management plan to control how much manure he is allowed to spread. on its crops. These rules are in place to limit nutrient pollution like manure and other agricultural runoff from farms, which contaminates local waterways and threatens wildlife. But Dotter says the plans are “a huge amount of paperwork” and cost him thousands of dollars every year. “It’s getting out of hand,” he said.

Caroline Novak, assistant director of the Professional Dairy Managers of Pennsylvania, an industry group, points out that many Pennsylvania dairy farmers have embraced sustainability strategies. She cited mechanisms such as no-till, a soil management strategy intended to keep the carbon in the earth, and anaerobic digesters, which capture methane from cow poop and then convert the potent greenhouse gas greenhouse into more environmentally friendly biogas to sell or use as fuel.

Schrack Farms has a digester that partially feeds the farm, which Harbach says helps “tremendously” with energy bills and heating. He notes that the technology isn’t very common on Pennsylvania dairy farms: According to the USDA, only 25 dairy farm digesters have been installed in the state, which has more than 5,000 dairies. Novak said digesters have not proven feasible for many due to maintenance costs.

The Novak Dairy Managers Organization is one of the partners in a new federally funded research initiative at Pennsylvania State University to study the sustainability of dairy farms, called the “L ‘climate-smart agriculture that is profitable, regenerative, exploitable and trustworthy’, or CARAT. According to Armen Kemanian, project leader and professor of agricultural sciences at the university, the aim is to research the carbon footprint of different processes on dairy farms, from production to sale. Ultimately, he said, the project will come up with sustainability strategies that are good for both the environment and farmers’ businesses.

Last month, the university announced that the project would receive up to $25 million from the USDA’s Climate-Smart Commodities Initiative, a broad federal funding effort designed to expand markets for products from farms, ranches and forests that operate sustainably. It is notably one of five conservation programs run by the federal department that have been criticized for their lack of financial transparency.

Novak said one of the goals of Project CARAT is to eventually make way for climate-smart product labeling or climate credits for Pennsylvania dairy farms that practice sustainable strategies. “This is data we’ve wanted to capture for some time,” she said. “We demanded to know what we do well and what it is worth.”

Novak said his group of dairy managers has members who think their farms are already carbon neutral. To her, therefore, it makes sense that farmers in the state would prefer fewer regulations. “You don’t necessarily need legislation to encourage people to do the right thing,” she said. “Our members don’t need to be legislated; they don’t need laws requiring them to do these things.

However, few would dispute that agricultural pollution has been a problem for Pennsylvania’s ecosystems. Nutrient pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, for example, has threatened wildlife and led to excessive algae blooms. According to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, the state is tasked with achieving 69% of the nutrient pollution reductions the Federal Environmental Protection Agency requires for the bay by 2025. .

Requiring dairies to adopt nutrient management plans is part of the state’s strategy to make these cuts. Last year, Pennsylvania fell short of its pollution reduction goals.

Still, ahead of the high-profile Nov. 8 election, Dotter and Harbach are looking for candidates they believe will meet the needs of dairy farmers, which they say means less regulation.

“I would vote for the governor who is going to reduce the bureaucracy and the regulations that we have,” Harbach said.

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The campaign website of State Sen. Doug Mastriano, the Republican gubernatorial candidate, says that if elected, he will cut regulations, including those aimed at the natural gas industry. Mastriano also opposes current Gov. Tom Wolf’s cooperation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, a multi-state program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the energy sector. . Among other carbon offset benefits, the initiative provides allowances to dairy farms that operate manure digesters.

The Democratic gubernatorial candidate, state Attorney General Josh Shapiro, has been endorsed by several environmental groups in Pennsylvania. He also supports keeping the state’s natural gas industry, although he has called for greater regulation of the chemicals involved in natural gas drilling and fracking. According to the campaign, Shapiro will also “invest in agricultural infrastructure and ensure that farmers have the financing and investments necessary for agricultural production.”

Green Party candidates for governor and lieutenant governor, Christina DiGiulio and Michael Bagdes-Canning, support the installation of more manure digesters and would like to see more research initiatives focusing on sustainable practices, such as the CARAT project.

In Dotter’s view, however, none of the candidates offered satisfactory plans to help the dairy industry. “We didn’t really single them out on agricultural issues,” he said.

He feels that Mastriano is “too right-wing”, but he nevertheless plans to vote “conservative” at all levels. Harbach too.

“I think you’ll find that 95% of working farmers will go the conservative route,” Harbach said. “And I’m no exception.”

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Democratic Florida gubernatorial candidate’s top staffer arrested for domestic violence https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/democratic-florida-gubernatorial-candidates-top-staffer-arrested-for-domestic-violence/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 17:52:30 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/democratic-florida-gubernatorial-candidates-top-staffer-arrested-for-domestic-violence/ Austin Durrer, campaign manager for Democratic Florida gubernatorial candidate Charlie Crist, has been arrested for domestic violence. On October 20, the Crist campaign said Durrer would be leaving to settle a family issue. Durrer was arrested days earlier in Cambridge, Md., for second-degree assault, Fox News reported. The case is being classified as “domestic violence” […]]]>

Austin Durrer, campaign manager for Democratic Florida gubernatorial candidate Charlie Crist, has been arrested for domestic violence.

On October 20, the Crist campaign said Durrer would be leaving to settle a family issue. Durrer was arrested days earlier in Cambridge, Md., for second-degree assault, Fox News reported. The case is being classified as “domestic violence” and he was released on $10,000 bail. The court asked Durrer to leave his home and hand over his firearm. The Crist campaign’s Thursday announcement of Durrer’s departure did not mention the domestic violence arrest.

According to the probable cause affidavit read to NBC News by the prosecutor in the Amanda Leonard case, Jackie Whisman, the mother of her child, alleged that an argument with Durrer “became physical.” The signs of physical injury on Whisman’s face were consistent with his accounts, according to the affidavit.

Police who arrived at the scene arrested Durrer on the spot, as authorities have the authority to do in the event that a domestic violence-related call involves signs of physical injury, Leonard said.

Whisman was also charged with second-degree assault. Whisman and Durrer are now seeking to drop the charges.

“Very sadly, an incident occurred this week at our home that we both regret. We are both working to drop the legal charges and move forward. Our main focus right now is our daughter, our oldest. great joy, and we appreciate the privacy and respect as we navigate as a family,” the duo said in a statement to CBS.

Previous work with Democrats, Crist Campaign

Durrer previously worked for the Commerce Department’s Economics and Statistics Administration subagency during the Obama administration as well as former Rep. Jim Moran (D-Va.)

In December 2016, he was hired by Crist to act as congressional chief of staff. This year, Durrer was tasked with leading Crist’s gubernatorial campaign.

Crist resigned from the United States House on August 31 to prepare for his gubernatorial bid against current Republican Governor Ron DeSantis. Crist’s campaign failed to generate the support needed to be a threat to his opponent, with most polls showing DeSantis with a substantial lead.

A debate between the two was scheduled for September 28 but was later canceled due to Hurricane Ian. The debate is now set for October 24, when early voting will begin in many parts of Florida.

Meanwhile, Dave Kerner, a senior Palm Beach County Democrat who also serves as its commissioner, extended his support for DeSantis for the 2022 midterm governorship, according to a Sept. 22 report. Tweeter.

“Governor. DeSantis opponent DeSantis has called for a reallocation of resources away from law enforcement,” Kerner said. “FL can’t afford people like Charlie Crist who want to defund the police and make our communities less secure.”

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Naveen Athrappully is a reporter and covers world affairs and events at The Epoch Times.

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Ok so. Governor Kevin Stitt mocks Democratic challenger Joy Hofmeister for accurately scoring the state’s crime rate https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ok-so-governor-kevin-stitt-mocks-democratic-challenger-joy-hofmeister-for-accurately-scoring-the-states-crime-rate/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 18:26:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ok-so-governor-kevin-stitt-mocks-democratic-challenger-joy-hofmeister-for-accurately-scoring-the-states-crime-rate/ Comment this story Comment During a Wednesday night debate between Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt (R) and his Democratic challenger, Joy Hofmeister, the governor took issue with Hofmeister’s pointing out — with precision — the problem of violent crime in the state. State. “So let’s talk about the facts: The fact is that violent crime rates […]]]>

Comment

During a Wednesday night debate between Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt (R) and his Democratic challenger, Joy Hofmeister, the governor took issue with Hofmeister’s pointing out — with precision — the problem of violent crime in the state. State.

“So let’s talk about the facts: The fact is that violent crime rates are higher in Oklahoma under your watch than in New York or California,” said Hofmeister, who is the state’s superintendent of public instruction. ‘Oklahoma. “That’s a fact.”

Stitt interrupted twice to protest that it wasn’t true. The moderator said this should be checked.

What was not shown during the debate was that Hofmeister was right. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Oklahoma has a homicide rate of 9 deaths per 100,000, compared to 6.1 in California and 4.7 in New York.

During the debate, however, Stitt turned and pointed at the audience, his jaw dropping.

“Wait, Oklahomans, do you think we have higher crime than New York or California? That’s what she just said!” he said.

Hofmeister nodded as some in the audience cheered.

“Safety and security is my top priority, and that will be as governor,” she added.

“Thank you very much. Let’s move on to the next question,” the moderator said.

The exchange spread quickly on social media, with many viewers pointing out that a quick fact check would have revealed Hofmeister to be accurate. Attention to the debate also highlighted what polls showed as a close race between Hofmeister and Stitt – unusual in a red state that former President Donald Trump won by 33 points in 2020.

But several factors made the race competitive, even in an election year when the non-ruling party would generally have an advantage. Hofmeister is a longtime former Republican who switched parties last year to challenge Stitt. And Stitt, a member of the Cherokee Nation, has also clashed with the state’s tribal leaders since taking office.

Lisa Billy, Oklahoma’s former secretary of Native American affairs, resigned from Stitt’s cabinet early in his tenure, accusing him of mishandling tribal gaming pacts.

“It has become increasingly clear that you are engaged in an unnecessary conflict that poses a real risk of lasting damage to the Tribal-State relationship and to our economy,” Billy wrote in his 2019 resignation letter, according to the report. ‘Oklahoman.

“You have rejected advice and facts that show the danger of your chosen approach and have remained determined to break with the tribes, both by refusing to engage with the language of the pact and, more recently, by suggesting that you would move our tribal partners with out-of-state commercial gaming operators,” Billy added.

The strained relationship prompted five of the state’s largest tribes to collectively endorse Hofmeister earlier this month.

“When it comes to working with the Oklahoma Tribal Nations, [Hofmeister] understands that our sovereignty is not a partisan issue or a threat, but rather an opportunity to forge new partnerships while strengthening existing ones because Oklahomans thrive together when we all work together,” the Cherokee leaders said. , Chickasaw, Muscogee, Choctaw and the Seminole Nations.

After Wednesday night’s debate, Cherokee Nation Leader Chuck Hoskin Jr. took to Twitter to berate Stitt for suggesting he was open to talking with tribal leaders.

“There have been no invitations to meet Governor Stitt and no meetings are scheduled,” Hoskin tweeted. “That Gov Stitt thinks he can order tribal leaders to come to his office just by saying so on live television says a lot about why [he has] been a failure in state/tribe relations.

Stitt also doubled down on his anti-abortion stance, vowing he’d do Oklahoma”the most pro-life state in the country.” In May, Stitt enacted a measure banning abortions from the time of “fertilization,” effectively banning almost all abortions in the state.

Abortion has been a galvanizing issue for Democratic voters since the Supreme Court overruled in June Roe vs. Wade, which for nearly 50 years guaranteed the right to abortion in the United States. Hofmeister, a lifelong Southern Baptist, said she’s “personally pro-life” but has pledged to overturn Stitt’s abortion ban because she thinks it’s a decision of health between a woman and her doctor.

The Republican Governors Association stepped in to help Stitt in the unusually competitive race, launching a massive ad campaign against Hofmeister this month in an attempt to secure what would normally be a safe GOP office.

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