Democratic Candidate – Shaughnessy For Congress http://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:38:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4.png Democratic Candidate – Shaughnessy For Congress http://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ 32 32 South Dakota Democrats and Republicans recruit candidates for 2022 election https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/south-dakota-democrats-and-republicans-recruit-candidates-for-2022-election/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:38:40 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/south-dakota-democrats-and-republicans-recruit-candidates-for-2022-election/ SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO) – Time is officially running out for potential 2022 candidates. Starting January 1, candidates could sign nomination forms with the South Dakota Secretary of State’s office and begin circulating petitions among members of their political party. In November, the people of South Dakota will vote for a US senator’s seat, a […]]]>

SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO) – Time is officially running out for potential 2022 candidates.

Starting January 1, candidates could sign nomination forms with the South Dakota Secretary of State’s office and begin circulating petitions among members of their political party. In November, the people of South Dakota will vote for a US senator’s seat, a representative’s seat, a South Dakota governor, and state lawmakers.

State Law prohibits the printing of any candidate’s name on an official primary election ballot, unless a petition has been filed in that person’s name after December 31 and before March 29.

Officials from the South Dakota Republican Party and the South Dakota Democratic Party have made announcements calling on potential candidates to work with party offices.

Berk Ehrmantraut, executive director of the Democratic Party of South Dakota, said that with a new legislative map for districts, there were new opportunities for possible candidates.

“I think there’s always a little less energy in a non-presidential year, but these midterm elections really matter in South Dakota,” Ehrmantraut said. “We really encourage people to take a look at their new district and decide if maybe now is the time for them to get involved. ”

Trying to get new candidates to run for office, Ehrmantraut said the biggest concern he heard from potential candidates was the current state of politics in America.

“It’s very angry. He feels very divided. People are looking at this and wondering if this is something that they want to be a part of,” he said. We need a policy where people work together to solve problems.

Ehrmantraut said if people look at the current state of politics and don’t think it reflects the style of decision-making they like, they should run for office.

“This is an indication that you should step up and be a leader for your community,” Ehrmantraut said. “Running for office can be one of the most rewarding experiences of your life. This is your opportunity to chat with your friends, neighbors and members of your community about what matters to them.

The South Dakota GOP held a “Candidate Development Workshop” in November and had a number of nominees declared.

There have been a handful of new Republican candidates announcing state legislative posts, but the GOP leadership has also seen Senator John Thune, the party’s oldest statesman, weigh his options of serving another six. years in the United States Senate or withdrawing from politics.

Thune told the Black Hills Pioneer last month his wife wanted him to retire and said this week to make an announcement on his decision by Sunday.

KELOLAND News has reached out to SD GOP Chairman Dan Lederman for a candidate recruiting interview and left a message at Republican Party headquarters in South Dakota. This story will be updated with any response received.

Republicans hold a solid lead on the electoral roll

At early 2022, South Dakota had 279,331 registered Republicans, 152,709 Democrats, 139,847 Independents, 2,605 Libertarians, 1,380 other registered and 63,510 inactive voters.

Legislative candidates in Republican and Democratic states need 50 signatures from people registered in their party or 1% of the vote for the candidate for governor of their party in their constituency for the 2018 elections.

Independent candidates for the US Senate, House or Governor need 3,393 signatures, while Republicans need 1,730 and Democrats 1,615 signatures.

Ehrmantraut said Democrats hope to have some sort of announcement regarding the governor’s race soon.

“We continue to have conversations with people interested in running for governor and figuring out this logistics,” Ehrmantraut said.

It doesn’t matter who ends up competing in the statewide races, Ehrmantraut said the goal of the South Dakota Democratic Party is to win the state legislature. There is currently a Republican super-majority of 94 versus 11 Democratic members.

“When Peter gets too out of balance, too far to one side or the other, it’s just not good decision-making that happens,” Ehrmantraut said. “We get better policy, better solutions for the state when we have more balanced representation in Pierre.”



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New data proves bail reform has both worked and failed, depending on who you ask https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/new-data-proves-bail-reform-has-both-worked-and-failed-depending-on-who-you-ask/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 22:07:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/new-data-proves-bail-reform-has-both-worked-and-failed-depending-on-who-you-ask/ The state has released the first full year of data on bail reform, and it has both opponents and supporters saying the numbers prove their views. Supporters have pointed out the low percentage of those released before trial under bail reform – less than 4% – who have been re-arrested for violent crimes as evidence […]]]>

The state has released the first full year of data on bail reform, and it has both opponents and supporters saying the numbers prove their views. Supporters have pointed out the low percentage of those released before trial under bail reform – less than 4% – who have been re-arrested for violent crimes as evidence reform works. Meanwhile, opponents are denouncing the high gross number – more than 3,400 – as proof that lawmakers must make changes to the current bail system.

The glaring disparity was visible on Tuesday, when virtual dueling press conferences scheduled at the same time took very different approaches to criminal justice issues. On the one hand, Representative Tom Suozzi, Democratic candidate for governor, denounced recent spikes in violent crimes such as murder. “We have a really serious problem in our condition,” said Suozzi. “I think we haven’t talked enough about it. He didn’t attribute the recent increase in crime to any particular factor, but made sure to highlight what he saw as the negative effects of bail reform.

Suozzi directly referenced a Times Union article which drew attention over the weekend to analyze raw data released by the state. He revealed that of the nearly 100,000 people freed thanks to the 2019 bail reforms, less than 4% were re-arrested for a violent crime while awaiting trial, representing around 3,400 people in total. . Only about 1% of re-arrests involved a gun. Overall, two-thirds of those released have not been re-arrested, with the remainder charged with non-violent felonies and misdemeanors.

One can look at the low percentage of arrests for violent crimes among those released before their trial, but Suozzi focused on the raw number of alleged crimes, saying it was way too many. “It’s not just statistics, this is real life stuff,” Suozzi said. “Each of these crimes involves the victim, someone whose life is torn apart by a crime.” He has advocated, as he has done in previous campaign events, for changes to bail reform, such as giving judges the discretion to fire an accused if he is found to be dangerous.

Suozzi did not provide details on how he would ensure that judges’ prejudices did not again affect those detained before their trial. But he suggested that a system similar to the CompStat Police – which tracks New York crime statistics – could apply to judges and their decision-making. Suozzi said “common sense” dictates that more than 3,000 cases are problematic when City & State asks him the difference between statistics that could be used with judges and statistics that suggest a low rate of re-arrest for violent crimes .

At the same time, advocates for criminal justice reform – joined by new Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg – held their own press conference to promote parole reform. More specifically, a law that would allow inmates people over 55 who have served at least 15 years become eligible for parole and another bill that make it easier for anyone eligible for parole.

The two issues are of course not directly related, but the dueling press conferences have offered very different images of New York – one where too many people are dangerously released and one where the state is not releasing enough people who should. have this opportunity. “I think in general it’s not really about the facts,” Senator Julia Salazar of Brooklyn told City & State. “These are competing stories about public safety. She said the bail data is far from complete, in part because there are no analyzes to compare it to years prior to bail reform, but argued that the information available do not suggest that bail reform poses a significant threat to public safety. “Whatever is good for them, the narrative that Congressman Suozzi or whoever wants to push forward is what they’re going to push forward,” Salazar said.

Debate over the relative success of bail reform has also taken place on the opinion pages and on Twitter. The New York Post published a editorial chastises Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie over bail reform, pointing to anecdotal evidence of its failure on December 29. Heastie hit back at the newspaper on Twitter on Tuesday, calling for the editorial “too biased (and) one-sided. “He rather bonded with a Times Union editorial who took a more balanced view based on state data and concluded that it was still too early to draw any conclusions about bail reform. Yet activists on both sides have used this data to justify themselves – it’s either “almost 4%” re-arrested for violent crimes and a whopping 1 in 3 re-arrested, or it’s “only 4%”. % ”With a two-thirds majority of defendants not committing any new suspected crimes.

The point may be moot with qualified Democratic majorities in both houses of the state legislature, most of which – including leaders – have publicly expressed little interest in making further changes to the liberation system under bail. But with Eric Adams freshly in office as New York’s new mayor and pushing for more reform reforms, revisiting the contentious issue is certainly not entirely out of place.

– With a report by Zach Williams



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Athol Daily News – Athol Democrats to virtually meet to plan 2022 election season https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/athol-daily-news-athol-democrats-to-virtually-meet-to-plan-2022-election-season/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 20:43:21 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/athol-daily-news-athol-democrats-to-virtually-meet-to-plan-2022-election-season/ Posted: 1/2/2022 15:29:18 Modified: 1/2/2022 15:28:38 PM The Democratic City of Athol Committee will hold a virtual meeting on January 11 at 6:30 p.m. to plan for the 2022 election season, when state voters elect a governor, lieutenant governor, treasurer, attorney general , a Commonwealth Secretary and Auditor. All senators and state officials will also […]]]>

Posted: 1/2/2022 15:29:18

Modified: 1/2/2022 15:28:38 PM

The Democratic City of Athol Committee will hold a virtual meeting on January 11 at 6:30 p.m. to plan for the 2022 election season, when state voters elect a governor, lieutenant governor, treasurer, attorney general , a Commonwealth Secretary and Auditor. All senators and state officials will also be on the November ballot, and the redistribution will mean Senator Anne Gobi will no longer represent Athol. Instead, Athol will be moved to Senator Jo Comerford’s district. The committee will also discuss plans for a Democratic caucus, to be held on Saturday March 5, to elect delegates to the June 4 nominating convention to be held in Worcester.

The democratic city of Athol committee holds its meetings, open to the general public, on the second Tuesday of each month. Most meetings take place both in person at Liberty Hall and via Zoom, although the January meeting is completely virtual due to concerns over COVID-19. Candidates for elections are often invited as speakers at the start of the 6.30 p.m. meetings. Last month, the Committee heard from Senator Diana DiZoglio, candidate for the post of auditor, and Quentin Palfrey, who is exploring a possible candidacy for the post of attorney general. The January 11 meeting will include a question and answer session with Danielle Allen, candidate for governor.

To receive the Zoom link for the January meeting, please contact President Margot Parrot, 978-830-4542.


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Young protesters win small victories in struggle for democracy: hungry to vote – News https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/young-protesters-win-small-victories-in-struggle-for-democracy-hungry-to-vote-news/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 13:54:52 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/young-protesters-win-small-victories-in-struggle-for-democracy-hungry-to-vote-news/ UN-PAC members protest outside the White House on the ninth day of a 15-day hunger strike in December (courtesy of Shana Gallagher) Group of 20 students – including one from central Texas – terminated 15 days hunger-strike next to the White House last week with two modest wins: a potential date for the Senate Freedom […]]]>

UN-PAC members protest outside the White House on the ninth day of a 15-day hunger strike in December (courtesy of Shana Gallagher)

Group of 20 students – including one from central Texas – terminated 15 days hunger-strike next to the White House last week with two modest wins: a potential date for the Senate Freedom to Vote Act and a scheduled January meeting with staff members for President Joe Biden.

Let us introduce you A-PAC, a student coalition from the youth movement surrounding Bernie Sanders’ 2016 and 2020 presidential campaigns. Shana gallagher, Austin-based national youth coordinator for Sanders and executive director of the fledgling coalition, said the A-PAC was created to harness momentum around the core issues of young volunteers: expanded access to the vote and end of partisan gerrymandering.

“We organized a lot with the students because Bernie often talks about young people and their importance and power,” said Gallagher, calling from the scene of the ongoing hunger strike. “He was the only candidate in the race with a national student organization that had funds, resources and staff.”

As the A-PAC organized nationally, it strived to reach students in Arizona and West Virginia in particular, the home states of the United States. Kyrsten Sinema and Joe manchin. The hunger strike began at the Arizona State Capitol in Phoenix and moved to DC after A-PAC had a meeting with Sinema.

Bryce lambeth, a major junior in finance at Texas State University, volunteered to take care of the logistics, a glamorous headline for the guy who brought hunger strikers to various places. “I was working on the Bernie campaign a bit. Then Shana contacted me and told me about the Freedom to Vote Act,” Lambeth said. “After reading it, I was really excited about it. And I realized how important it was.”

The free vote bill, introduced by Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-Minnesota) and other Congressional Democrats in September, contains many elements of People’s Law, who failed to make it to the Senate. Texas Democrats, including lawmakers who broke the quorum and fled the state to avoid the First Special Session of the 87th Texas Legislature and the “electoral integrity” measures of their GOP colleagues, also lobbied for the John Lewis Voting Rights Act, which would restore and update the protections of the landmark 1965 legislation that were removed by a Supreme Court ruling in 2013.

“It is unfortunate and depressing that democratic reform has become a partisan issue in the United States Senate and in state legislatures across the country. We know that Conservative voters overwhelmingly support reforms to the freedom to vote law. ” – UN-PAC Executive Director Shana Gallagher

Un-PAC agrees with Texas Democratic stars as state officials. Trey Martinez Fischer, from San Antonio, Gina Hinojosa from Austin, and Jasmin crockett of Dallas (a prominent U.S. House candidate in 2022 herself), who each traveled to Washington to meet with the hunger strikers, that voting rights and protecting democracy are issues that cross state borders and deserve national attention. But Gallagher is quick to point out that the A-PAC is intentionally non-partisan.

“I have certainly been inspired and grateful to Democrats, but I think it is important to stress that it is unfortunate and depressing that democratic reform has become a partisan issue in the United States Senate and in the United States. state legislatures across the country, ”said Gallagher. “We know that Conservative voters overwhelmingly support the reform of the freedom to vote law. It has very unfortunately become a partisan issue.”

Un-PAC sought to meet with Texas senators, both Republicans. Asked about the freedom to vote law, the senator John cornyn said to the Chronicle via a spokesperson, he considers that the bill is unconstitutional because it removes the authority given to states to organize their elections. Instead, this authority would be centralized in DC; the bill would do the Federal Election Commission a more partisan body, would allow what Cornyn sees as collection of ballot papers, and would discourage voter’s card requirements. “All of this, I believe, is intended to weaken the integrity measures built into the voting system that most states, including Texas, have,” said Cornyn.

In total, in 2021 alone, 19 states passed 34 laws that will restrict voters’ access to polling stations, according to the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University Law School. Texas’ Senate Bill 1, which was eventually passed after the Democrats returned to Austin, and went into effect on Dec. 2, stands out from the Brennan Center as one of the more aggressive efforts to limit the franchise. (During the same period, 25 states, blue and red, adopted measures that expanded access to the vote.)

Texas law prohibits some of the most innovative strategies that increased voter turnout in 2020, such as drive-thru lanes, 24-hour polling stations, and eligibility and access. larger in postal voting. The law also provides penalties for election officials who deny access to election observers, and requires those who assist voters to swear an oath that they will not interfere or coerce the voter.

Un-PAC has set an informal deadline of Martin Luther King Jr Day that the Senate adopt the law on the freedom to vote. If the vote has not taken place by January 17, the A-PAC will consider other ways to step up its tactics.


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Major Philly Union Endorses PA State Senate Candidate Paul Prescod https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/major-philly-union-endorses-pa-state-senate-candidate-paul-prescod/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 17:45:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/major-philly-union-endorses-pa-state-senate-candidate-paul-prescod/ One of Philadelphia’s largest unions backed Paul Prescod, a progressive Democratic candidate for Pennsylvania’s 8th Senate District, joining a growing list of working-class advocates backing the countryside longtime educator and organizer of the labor movement. “I will be ready to take on the rich interests which hinder the future we deserve.” “I am delighted to […]]]>

One of Philadelphia’s largest unions backed Paul Prescod, a progressive Democratic candidate for Pennsylvania’s 8th Senate District, joining a growing list of working-class advocates backing the countryside longtime educator and organizer of the labor movement.

“I will be ready to take on the rich interests which hinder the future we deserve.”

“I am delighted to have the approval of the AFSCME 33 District Council! »Prescod said Common dreams. “This 10,000-member union represents the sanitation workers, water utility workers, street cleaners, school crossing guards and others who move the city of Philadelphia forward.”

“These are the essential workers who have suffered so much during this pandemic, and who this campaign is about,” Prescod said.

The Pennsylvania State Senate candidate – an organizer dating back to when he was a student at Temple University, after which he became a public school educator and a member of the Philadelphia Teachers’ Federation – added that “we must protect and develop the public sector, while strengthening our public sector unions.

During word Last month when launching his campaign, Prescod said that “we all got the feeling that we don’t know whether to believe in a candidate running for public office. The most important thing to know about a candidate is what he did before showing up for office. “

Prescod said Common dreams that he has established a strong relationship with District Council 33 of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) and other local unions in supporting the fight for risk premiums and personal protection that emerged at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic.

This effort culminated in Philadelphia City Council’s June 2020 passage of the Essential Worker Protection Act, a one-of-a-kind piece of legislation that prevents employers from retaliating against workers who report violations of Covid-19 safety guidelines.

AFSCME District Council 33 President Ernest Garrett said in a statement Monday that “District Council 33 supports Paul Prescod because we believe Paul represents what we strive for every day; fight for the men and women who take the bus early to work, fight for the men and women who struggle to choose between putting food on the table and paying the light bill, and fighting for the men and women who need and deserve decent health care for their families. “

“We know he will fight for us,” added Garrett.

Prescod, member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA) and editor-in-chief of Jacobin magazine, long ago argued that the fight against racial and economic inequalities depends on strengthening the public sector and organized labor, and he has been intimately involved in this effort for years.

As Prescod said Jacobin in one interview published earlier this month, “Most insurgent left-wing challengers don’t usually get much support from workers because unions often want to support who they think will win. My campaign begins in a unique position where we have already four union supporters, and are looking for and anticipating more.

In supporting Prescod, the AFSCME 33 District Council joined the Federation of Faculty and Staff of the Community College of Philadelphia; the national federation of the Brotherhood of maintenance workers; International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Local 623; Association of the Temple of University Professionals; and Philly DSA. The American Postal Workers Union Local 89 followed AFSCME 33 District Council in endorsing Prescod, the candidate announcement.

“This is crucial, not just in principle because the trade union movement is important to me, but as a concrete part of the strategy to mobilize non-traditional voters,” Prescod said in early December. “To give an example, I have a strong relationship with Teamsters Local 623, which represents UPS employees. Many of their base members in Southwest Philly, which is in my constituency, generally do not vote. Now they are mobilized to solicit by the union, and they recognize me by their pickets and at their meetings. They see a candidate that their leadership is really enthusiastic about.

“This campaign aims to shift to a public investment model, putting people before profits.”

He added that this “is also going to be a big part of the equation of how we build a progressive labor coalition. We are going to have representations to union members, DSA members and members of other progressive organizations. simple: we’re going to be having in-person conversations over a long period of time to try to galvanize as many people as possible. “

At last month’s launch event, Prescod said, “Above all else, I believe in building a workers’ movement.” He added that “this campaign is about bringing the movement that we have built all these years into the halls of power in Harrisburg.”

“I think we need more educators running for public office,” Prescod said, “because we have a comprehensive view of all the issues we face in our city and state. teachers, we know our students don’t come to us in a vacuum, we know they come to class with the issues around them.

“But you don’t have to be an educator to see that we are in a deep crisis, this city is in a deep crisis,” he added. “I know we all feel it. And the only way out of this crisis is a bold change of direction. A bold new attitude that says we’re not going to agree to these terms anymore.”

Prescod clarified, “We are not going to allow our public schools to collapse. We are not going to allow our school buildings to be infested with asbestos, mold and lead. That children are dying in schools because full time nurses are not there. That the class sizes are 35 to 40 children per class. That our after-school programs are being phased out. “

Notably, Prescod stressed that “we cannot look to the free market to solve this problem.”

Instead, he said, “we need to make a public commitment to our schools. As a legislator, I will not rest until every school in Pennsylvania is fully funded. I won’t rest until every school has beautiful new buildings, has small class sizes, has enough support staff, and has every after-school program a child could dream of. “

Prescod’s campaign underscored the need for a Green New Deal that can unify struggles for economic and environmental justice.

“Our movement says we are not going to sit here and accept that uncontrollable climate change will destroy our lives,” Prescod said. “What do we expect in the future if we keep doing nothing?” “

“We have a huge opportunity here,” he added. “We can create tens of thousands of quality union jobs in the fight against climate change. Think how many jobs we could create if we retrofitted every public school building to be energy efficient. How many jobs could we create if we massively increased public transit and created a high speed rail system we can be proud of. How many jobs could we create if we built high speed Internet access to all rural and urban communities in the Commonwealth of Nations. “

Prescod argued that “the 8th arrondissement can be a leader in the state when it comes to infrastructure. And as a legislator, I will stress that as we move towards a renewable energy future, we are creating union jobs to support families, not weak jobs. salaried jobs. “

“At the heart of this campaign,” Prescod said, “this campaign is about moving to a model of public investment, putting people before profits. A model that says health care is a human right, and we can create a health system that guarantees quality care for all Pennsylvanians. A public investment model that says quality housing is a human right, and we can create beautiful and affordable housing. A model that says paid employment is a human right and it’s time to immediately raise the minimum wage to at least $ 15 an hour. ”

Prescod said Jacobin that he was inspired by the 2016 and 2020 campaigns of Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) for the presidential nomination of the Democratic Party, in particular the idea that he is a “chief organizer” who uses his power elected to support progressive movements on the ground.

The Pennsylvania State Senate candidate told his audience last month that “my role in public service will not be just to draft laws. It will also be about how I can use this desk to help develop the movements that we will need in the future. When the Teamsters fight UPS, doing everything in my power to tip the scales in favor of workers When … educators fight to save [a] at school, doing everything in my power to make sure they win. “

“This campaign is about bringing the movement we have built all these years into the halls of power in Harrisburg.”

“I will be prepared to take on the rich interests that hinder the future we deserve,” Prescod said.

“But these same rich and powerful interests will support my opponent,” he added. “We are starting a journey that some think is impossible. They think there is no way that a teacher in a public school can face a political dynasty, there is no way to defeat all the money of the companies that they will spend to defeat us. “

Prescod admitted that “I’m not only against the incumbent, I’m also against his backers. People like Jeffrey Yass, a billionaire who invests money in privatizing schools, who puts money in far-right projects across the state, loved by Betsy DeVosses around the world. “

“They are going to rely on the money to buy this election, but we are going to rely on the people,” he said. “We’re going to win by organizing, we’re going to win by talking to our neighbors, we’re going to win by knocking on doors, we’re going to win by volunteering. The driving force behind this campaign is the ordinary working and middle class. – classy people like you. “

“I have witnessed the profound inequality that affects our state and our cities,” Prescod, a longtime resident of West Philadelphia, said on his campaign site, which includes more information about its platform and ways to get involved. “Workers need more, and I am running for the Pennsylvania State Senate to fight for the future we deserve.”


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Minor presidential candidate Ahn rejects possible alliance with ruling party’s Lee https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/minor-presidential-candidate-ahn-rejects-possible-alliance-with-ruling-partys-lee/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 01:50:46 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/minor-presidential-candidate-ahn-rejects-possible-alliance-with-ruling-partys-lee/ This photo taken last Thursday shows Ahn Cheol-soo, the presidential candidate of the Minor Opposition People’s Party, speaking at a press conference in Busan. (Yonhap) Minor opposition People’s Party presidential candidate Ahn Cheol-soo on Monday ignored a possible alliance with ruling Democratic Party (DP) presidential candidate Lee Jae-myung, saying he was not interested by nobody’s […]]]>

This photo taken last Thursday shows Ahn Cheol-soo, the presidential candidate of the Minor Opposition People’s Party, speaking at a press conference in Busan. (Yonhap)

Minor opposition People’s Party presidential candidate Ahn Cheol-soo on Monday ignored a possible alliance with ruling Democratic Party (DP) presidential candidate Lee Jae-myung, saying he was not interested by nobody’s offer.

Ahn rejected the opinion of DP chairman Song Young-gil that he could “fit in” with Lee. Song said earlier in an interview with the Yonhap News Agency that Ahn is essential for national development and is the most significant candidate in the opposition bloc.

“Song’s remark shows that they recognize the limit of the DP candidate and people know this is a politically motivated electoral reshuffle movement to cover that up,” Ahn wrote on his Facebook page. “I will go my way for the future of the country and a better change of government.”

Ahn then asked Song if his remarks represented Lee and the DP’s official position. He also wanted answers from the DP chairman if he agrees to punish the current government of Moon Jae-in and seek better regime change, as well as legislation on the Special Council’s investigation into the scandals surrounding Lee and Yoon Suk-yeol of the main opposition People Power Party. .

Ahn, a former doctor and software entrepreneur, is in his third presidential race. In 2012, he retired from the presidential race less than a month before the poll, supporting Moon Jae-in, then a candidate for the main opposition party.

The 59-year-old ran again in the 2017 election and finished third with 21.41% of the vote.

In a latest poll by Realmeter, Ahn was third with 5.6% support behind two major candidates, Yoon and Lee. (Yonhap)


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Democrats say they are serious about state elections. But are they too late? https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/democrats-say-they-are-serious-about-state-elections-but-are-they-too-late/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 23:08:59 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/democrats-say-they-are-serious-about-state-elections-but-are-they-too-late/ “It sounds a lot like rock climbing, pushing a boulder while your arms melt,” said Amanda Litman of the liberal group Run for Something, which recruits young people to run for state and local elections. Redistribution at a glance Every 10 years, every state in the United States is required to redraw the boundaries of […]]]>

“It sounds a lot like rock climbing, pushing a boulder while your arms melt,” said Amanda Litman of the liberal group Run for Something, which recruits young people to run for state and local elections.

Gaby Goldstein, co-founder of Sister District, a grassroots organization that supports progressive candidates in state legislative elections, noted that conservatives have rallied around state politics for decades. “I always say Democrats are behind the party,” she said.

The Democratic Party’s late interest in lower-level racing grew out of its murderous experience in 2010, when Republicans mounted an anti-Obama backlash to oust hundreds of incumbent Democrats nationwide. Spending just $ 30 million, Republicans toppled 680 state legislative seats and 20 chambers, a stunning victory that put them in a position to redraw the electoral maps and strengthen their grip over those states – and their delegations to Congress. – for a decade.

“Democrats frankly weren’t prepared during this cycle,” said Kelly Ward Burton, who at the time headed the House Democrats campaign committee. Now chair of Mr. Holder’s redistribution committee, Ms. Burton has worked closely with several Democratic campaign groups in hopes of a different outcome than the current round of redistribution.

Part hard politics and part good government activism, the group strategy has been to break down the GOP’s “trifectas” to the extent possible – reducing the number of states where Republicans have full control over it. the process of redistribution, because they hold the government and the majority in the two legislative ones. bedrooms. They also ask candidates for state and federal positions to pledge of support for “a fair redistribution which puts an end to the manipulation of maps and creates truly representative districts”, an aspiration which is sometimes in tension with more partisan objectives.

Halfway through the current redistribution brawl, the results of these Democratic efforts are mixed.

The long troubled Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee became a force under new leadership in 2016, putting the party in place to take six chambers in the 2018 midterm election. Since 2017, Democrats have toppled 10 offices of governor, notably on the battlefields of Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, and won seven seats on the State Supreme Court. Five states have adopted non-partisan redistribution reforms, leaving mapping to independent commissions.

But the blue wave Democrats counted on in 2020 never ended. Although Democratic groups have spent record amounts of money trying to reclaim GOP-owned state houses, their party ended in worse shape last year, losing both houses in New Hampshire. As a result, Republicans not only retained control over prices like the Arizona, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin legislatures, but they also retained the power to draw maps for 187 congressional districts, while Democrats control the fate of only 75.


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Frank Fuda and Dennis Malloy join the fray | News, Sports, Jobs https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/frank-fuda-and-dennis-malloy-join-the-fray-news-sports-jobs/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 07:14:12 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/frank-fuda-and-dennis-malloy-join-the-fray-news-sports-jobs/ WARREN – The race for the next Trumbull County commissioner seat is crowded as current commissioner Frank Fuda and former candidate Denny Malloy both say they have withdrawn petitions. Fuda confirmed on Wednesday that he had withdrawn petitions to run as a Democrat in order to be re-elected to his seat. Malloy, who previously ran […]]]>

WARREN – The race for the next Trumbull County commissioner seat is crowded as current commissioner Frank Fuda and former candidate Denny Malloy both say they have withdrawn petitions.

Fuda confirmed on Wednesday that he had withdrawn petitions to run as a Democrat in order to be re-elected to his seat.

Malloy, who previously ran as an independent to replace Mauro Cantalamessa, is expected to run for the nomination to run for the seat as a Republican candidate.

Representative Michael O’Brien D-Warren announced on Tuesday that he would run for the Jan. 1, 2023 commissioner seat now held by Fuda. Although he has withdrawn his petitions, Fuda said he does not plan to start circulating them until the New Year.

“Everyone has the right to run” said Fuda.

The longtime commissioner plans to set out his reasons for running for a new four-year term sometime after the start of the year.

It could be a more difficult year to win the Democratic nomination for Fuda, as he backed fellow Commissioner Niki Frenchko’s campaign against Trumbull County Democratic Party Chairman Dan Polivka in the year’s general election. last.

As a result of this action, the Niles Democratic Club sanctioned Fuda for two years for his participation in the club’s activities.

Malloy believes his previous strong run against Cantalamessa should help him win the next campaign for the office.

“I think my name awareness is high and with the support of the Republican Party and the Tories, I should be the frontrunner before 2022”, Malloy said. “Having been a Democratic voter for many years, I understand both sides and have many friends and supporters on both sides of the aisle.”

Malloy believes county employees deserve better than what they get.

“I feel for the dedicated workers who just want to be respected and appreciated by their leaders and the public for their performance” Malloy said.

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Voters have the right to know the philosophy of the candidates’ political parties https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/voters-have-the-right-to-know-the-philosophy-of-the-candidates-political-parties/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 11:01:46 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/voters-have-the-right-to-know-the-philosophy-of-the-candidates-political-parties/ George Korda is a political analyst for WATE-TV, hosts “State Your Case” from noon to 2 p.m. Sundays on WOKI-FM Newstalk 98.7, and is President of Korda Communications, a public relations and communications consultancy. Voters are warned, like children about a haunted house, that the putrid and pestilential hand of politics reaches out to corrupt […]]]>
  • George Korda is a political analyst for WATE-TV, hosts “State Your Case” from noon to 2 p.m. Sundays on WOKI-FM Newstalk 98.7, and is President of Korda Communications, a public relations and communications consultancy.

Voters are warned, like children about a haunted house, that the putrid and pestilential hand of politics reaches out to corrupt the otherwise noble and virgin… wait… for the election!

The debate over non-partisan school board races versus politically partisan school board races – and in Knoxville, city council elections as well – centers on an idealistic view that this is a bad idea for the politics of ‘be involved in certain political competitions. In reality, it’s like believing that if we don’t like the taste of salty seawater, it will get fresh if we want it to be fresh.

Mask Mandates and Critical Race Theory

Every engine of change is fueled by some form of fuel, and the growing discussions and actions regarding partisan school board elections are fueled by critical race theory and COVID-19 mask mandates. These are emotional and hypersensitive topics for many Americans, and lend themselves to simplistic positions that many people feel comfortable gravitating towards: people are classified as either all bad or just honorable, depending on the views of the people. observers.


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Webb County Democrats hold draw for primary ballot spots https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/webb-county-democrats-hold-draw-for-primary-ballot-spots/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 23:13:59 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/webb-county-democrats-hold-draw-for-primary-ballot-spots/ The Webb County Democratic Party held its draw on Wednesday for a spot in the 2022 Democratic Primary Voting at Laredo Firefighters Local 872 Fireman’s Union Hall. According to Sylvia Bruni, president of the Webb County Democratic Party, the draw is part of the process put in place by the Texas Secretary of State for […]]]>

The Webb County Democratic Party held its draw on Wednesday for a spot in the 2022 Democratic Primary Voting at Laredo Firefighters Local 872 Fireman’s Union Hall.

According to Sylvia Bruni, president of the Webb County Democratic Party, the draw is part of the process put in place by the Texas Secretary of State for the upcoming primary elections and the printing of the ballot.

This is the second part of the regular process, and it follows the acceptance of applications from applicants in all counties. According to Bruni, there are 24 Democratic nominations in Webb County, all of which are certified by the county party before being sent to the secretary of state.


There are 27 Democratic counties if you count multi-county positions such as State Senator Judith Zaffirini, who represents Webb among other counties.

The draw then sees the local candidates come together to have their positions on the ballots designated. This is done through a lottery system, in which candidates for a particular office each have an assigned number drawn from the system for their place on the ballot. That is, if three candidates numbered 1, 2 and 3 are chosen in the lottery as 3, 1 and 2; this is how the ballot will end up looking like in the next election.

Currently, Bruni said the process is waiting for all counties in the state to certify their findings. Once completed, Bruni will notify the secretary of the candidates who have an opposition on the ballot.

“This is part of a process that is meant to be very clear and very carefully managed so that there is no doubt that what they are doing is legal and within very tight deadlines,” Bruni said.

As every year before, getting the masses to vote will be a priority, and Bruni said it is important to understand who is on the ballot and for what position they are running. As an example, in the next gubernatorial race there will be eight Democratic candidates vying for the post.

“It will be a pretty busy ballot at the end of the day. Of course, the challenge will be to get people to vote. I hope that there is enough concern and interest and that we get a strong performance, ”said Bruni. “We will work to get the vote then.

“It won’t just be Webb County. When voters in Webb County go to vote in March, there will be some very solid state offices up for grabs, so it will be an important primary. “

As for candidate research, campaigns, candidate information and their platforms, it can be found through social media and personal web pages.

cocampo@lmtonline.com


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