Congressional District – Shaughnessy For Congress http://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:19:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4.png Congressional District – Shaughnessy For Congress http://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ 32 32 Republicans make marginal gains in South Texas as Democratic power wanes https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/republicans-make-marginal-gains-in-south-texas-as-democratic-power-wanes/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:19:38 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/republicans-make-marginal-gains-in-south-texas-as-democratic-power-wanes/ Although more competitive than any previous election cycle, the Rio Grande Valley midterm races re-elected many of its Democratic representatives. Republican candidates from Texas’ Rio Grande Valley have perpetuated a national narrative that a “red wave” of GOP support will head to the polls on Nov. 8. Blaming rising inflation and increased migrant crossings on […]]]>

Although more competitive than any previous election cycle, the Rio Grande Valley midterm races re-elected many of its Democratic representatives.

Republican candidates from Texas’ Rio Grande Valley have perpetuated a national narrative that a “red wave” of GOP support will head to the polls on Nov. 8. Blaming rising inflation and increased migrant crossings on President Joe Biden’s policies, their positions were shown in a flurry of attack announcements on local news networks.

But it seems it was just that: a narrative, after the GOP successfully overthrew a single State House seat and a congressional district. Even in the state’s biggest race, Republican Gov. Greg Abbott did not carry any of the four Rio Grande Valley counties.

Mayra Flores, Cassy Garcia and Monica De La Cruz have become the face of the region’s Republican hopefuls, dubbing themselves the “triple threat.” All campaigned as anti-abortion candidates and border wall supporters against the Democratic Party establishment, portraying their opponents as corrupt or too radical for South Texas.

Of the three candidates, only De La Cruz, an Alamo-based insurance agent, was elected. She won in Texas’ 15th congressional district and is the first Republican to be elected to that seat. De La Cruz benefited from a redesigned borough that favored Republicans and would have won former President Donald Trump by 2.8 percentage points. Previously, the district favored President Joe Biden by 1.9 percentage points.

Flores, the incumbent in Texas’ 34th congressional district, lost to three-time congressman Vicente Gonzalez by 8 percentage points. Garcia, a former staffer of Sen. Ted Cruz, lost to nine-term congressman Henry Cuellar by 13 percentage points.

Of the three, Flores was the sole incumbent. She was elected in a special election after then-incumbent Filemon Vela left the seat to work with a Washington, DC lobbying firm. The election of Flores over moderate, pro-life Democrat Dan Sanchez signaled to the GOP a possible turnaround in the electorate in the RGV, after it had already invested heavily in De La Cruz’s race earlier this year.

But Flores’ margin of victory in June was narrow, securing just 50.9% of the vote.

The same is true for the GOP vote increase margins in the Rio Grande Valley this midterm, compared to the 2020 election. According to Secretary of State election data, the region does not has seen only small increases, if not decreases, in GOP turnout from 2020.

Like Abbott, none of the Republican candidates have carried a Rio Grande Valley county in their races.

GOP weighs wins amid losses in South Texas

The GOP’s heavy investment in the region, however, has not been without some gains in traditionally Democratic districts. While turnout may have been limited from 2020 to present, compared to the 2018 midterm elections, all four Rio Grande Valley counties have seen GOP voter turnout increase between 10 and 18 percentage points .

Republicans have had a few victories on the ballot, but not in many high-profile congressional races. Some of those wins came in districts that previously favored Democrats that were redrawn to lean Republicans. As reported by the McAllen Monitor, these redistricting efforts were paramount to the GOP’s successes in the Rio Grande Valley.

Cameron County GOP Chairman and Texas Republican Party State Committee Member Morgan Cisneros Graham was not surprised by the results, given the way the districts were drawn. De La Cruz and Flores’ campaigns also had more national and state investment, compared to local races.

Graham says the “red wave” narrative — a term she says she’s never been a fan of — has been helpful for the national and state GOP to raise funds. But hardly any of these investments have been made in local races.

“When people saw all that money being pumped into our area, it was only being pumped into two federal races,” Graham said.

She continued: “We haven’t seen that (investment) drop at all in those local offices. On top of that, because the focus is at the top of the ticket, it still hurts your ballot. ”

Democrats push back on notion of growing GOP power

In a year when Republicans were supposed to win across the country in a landslide, they could barely pull off that win here — they should probably pack up and get the hell out of our area.

As for local races in the Rio Grande Valley, most of the Democratic incumbents won re-election. Either way, the GOP’s gains in the RGV were for the state’s Democratic party.

In an internal note acquired by the Texas Tribune, the Texas Democratic Party blamed GOP dark money, gerrymandering, Senate Bill 1 voting restrictions, and lack of support from national Democratic organizations for the party “not to do not even bigger gains” during the election.

“Not only did their insidious crunch and pack strategy simply make several seats more Republican, but they also intentionally made ‘safe Democratic’ districts – the ones Republicans knew they could afford to lose – even bluer. “said Jamarr, executive director of the Texas Democratic Party. Brown said in the memo. “These less competitive races mean less money invested and less of an overall Democratic campaign — which, as we’ve seen, leads to lower awareness and participation at all levels.”

But the GOP’s gains in the region aren’t entirely unexpected. The Republican Party’s investment in the area, in the form of heavy campaign contributions, the opening of a “Hispanic Community Center”, and grassroots organizing directly engaged a base that felt ignored by the Democratic Party.

“These Democratic leaders who have been in power in the Valley for a long time, they traditionally haven’t worked very hard to expand the electorate,” Cecilia Ballí, a cultural anthropologist and journalist, told NPR. “So I don’t think it’s just the National Democratic Party that’s taken Latinos for granted: I think the local Democratic establishment has done the same. And so you have disgruntled voters who are willing to try something. different.”

Flores capitalized on that sentiment in his campaign, saying the Democratic Party had abandoned South Texas.

After the election, Texas Democratic Party Chairman Gilberto Hinojosa saw the GOP’s gains in the Rio Grande Valley as a “fluke,” calling De La Cruz’s election a sign the GOP is winning of the pitch “complete bullshit”.

“There was no red wave in South Texas,” Hinojosa said in a statement. “Republicans in Austin and DC should realize that if – even in a year when Republicans were supposed to win across the country in a landslide, they could barely pull off that victory here – they should probably pack their bags and get the hell out of our region.”

Hinojosa’s confidence comes as the Democrats managed to retain most of the Rio Grande Valley seats in the election. Yet in the heavily Latino Rio Grande Valley, Democrats have seen narrow wins — and narrow losses — that some say should give them pause.

It was more of a purple wave and there was progress.

“The thing we’re not going back on is this notion that the Democratic Party automatically has the support of Latino voters because they’re ethnically ‘other’ and because they’re working class,” said Balli.

Local GOP Chairman Morgan Cisneros Graham said the party is now looking to the 2024 primaries, focusing on local, court and school board elections in the Rio Grande Valley. Claiming the metric of what constitutes a “red wave” in Texas politics has never been defined, she says the GOP’s gains have been positive for the party.

“If someone is more fundamental racing oriented, which I tend to be, then the impression would be that there hasn’t been a red wave in the RGV,” Graham said. “But if you’re someone who looks more at hard-hitting, more legislative offices, some would say, well, it was more of a purple wave and there was progress.”

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Lauren Boebert narrowly wins re-election in Colorado’s 3rd congressional district after Adam Frisch concession https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/lauren-boebert-narrowly-wins-re-election-in-colorados-3rd-congressional-district-after-adam-frisch-concession/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 18:05:23 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/lauren-boebert-narrowly-wins-re-election-in-colorados-3rd-congressional-district-after-adam-frisch-concession/ U.S. Representative Lauren Boebert waves to the cheering crowd during the GOP assembly at the Broadmoor World Arena on Saturday, April 9, 2022 in Colorado Springs.Hugh Carey / The Colorado Sun Republican U.S. Representative Lauren Boebert won re-election Friday in Colorado’s GOP-leaning 3rd congressional district, barely overcoming a strong rebuke from voters over her highly […]]]>
U.S. Representative Lauren Boebert waves to the cheering crowd during the GOP assembly at the Broadmoor World Arena on Saturday, April 9, 2022 in Colorado Springs.
Hugh Carey / The Colorado Sun

Republican U.S. Representative Lauren Boebert won re-election Friday in Colorado’s GOP-leaning 3rd congressional district, barely overcoming a strong rebuke from voters over her highly controversial tenure in Washington over the past two years to help her party expand. its small majority at the United States House.

Boebert led Democrat Adam Frisch, a former Aspen city councilman, by 551 votes Friday morning when Frisch relented during a video news conference with reporters. The contest will have one of the closest margins of any congressional race in the United States this year, if not the closest.

Frisch said on a call with reporters that he was not asking for the mandatory state-paid recount to which he is entitled under Colorado law, but that he supported the recount “to ensure continued faith. and the security of our elections”.



If that happens, Frisch would have to withdraw his candidacy to waive his right to a recountwhich must be completed by December 13 – it is very unlikely to make a significant dent in the margin between the two candidates.

“The likelihood of this recount changing more than a handful of votes is very low,” he said. “Very, very small. It would be dishonest and unethical for us, or any other group, to continue to raise false hopes.



Learn more at ColoradoSun.com.

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Williams wins 22nd congressional district race; Toby Shelley will be the next Onondaga County Sheriff https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/williams-wins-22nd-congressional-district-race-toby-shelley-will-be-the-next-onondaga-county-sheriff/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 03:26:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/williams-wins-22nd-congressional-district-race-toby-shelley-will-be-the-next-onondaga-county-sheriff/ We now know the results for two of three closed races on election night after Onondaga County finished counting mail-in and affidavit ballots. Republican Brandon Williams will represent the 22n/a congressional district after maintaining its narrow lead over Democrat Francis Conole. In a statement, Conole said he called Williams to offer his congratulations and wished […]]]>

We now know the results for two of three closed races on election night after Onondaga County finished counting mail-in and affidavit ballots. Republican Brandon Williams will represent the 22n/a congressional district after maintaining its narrow lead over Democrat Francis Conole. In a statement, Conole said he called Williams to offer his congratulations and wished him all the best in Congress representing Central New York. WAER News met the two election commissioners on Wednesday as ballots were scanned. Democratic Commissioner Dustin Czarny said most of their work is complete.

“Once the final unofficial results are released, we are looking at 99.99% of the ballots. The likelihood of a lead change at this point would be low.”

Republican Elections Commissioner Michele Sardo said only a handful of ballots remained.

“The military can still come in. They have two weeks, so next Tuesday would be the last day for them. There are cured ballots that can still come in. They have seven days.”

Corrected ballots are ballots corrected by voters after minor errors.

The other race decided by the final sweep of the ballots was for Onondaga County Sheriff. Democrat Toby Shelley will be the top cop in the county after edging out Republican Esteban Gonzalez by more than two percent of the vote. In a statement, Gonzalez congratulated Shelley on her win.

“There is no longer a path to victory, so I am fulfilling my election night promise and conceding,” González said. “I am grateful to the countless supporters who supported my candidacy.”

This leaves the 50e the Senate District race as the remaining undecided race, with incumbent Democrat John Mannion leading Republican Rebecca Shiroff by just 27 votes. This triggers an automatic manual recount. In a statement, Shiroff said she knew it would be a close race, and the unofficial results confirm that.

We look forward to the manual recount where each ballot will be carefully reviewed and counted. I hope that at the end of this process, I will be in a better position to serve the people of central New York as the next state senator.”

Mannion has not released a statement at the time of publication. Commissioner Czarny says they expected this race to come down to a hand count, meaning they will have to go through 90,000 ballots. The results of this race will not be known until sometime after Thanksgiving. Czarny says it’s important for voters to know that the board of elections has the final say on the results, not the candidates or their campaigns.

“It’s not really a campaign’s legal responsibility to concede or declare victory. What we’re looking for here is what the votes are. That should be what drives the narrative in close races. “

To be clear, neither Shiroff nor Mannion conceded or declared victory. And Gonzalez didn’t concede until Wednesday night. However at 22n/a congressional district race, Brandon Williams claimed victory the night after Election Day before thousands more votes were counted. Francis Conole only cashed on Wednesday night.

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Democrat Perez leads Kent to overthrow 3rd Congressional District https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/democrat-perez-leads-kent-to-overthrow-3rd-congressional-district/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 02:20:37 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/democrat-perez-leads-kent-to-overthrow-3rd-congressional-district/ By Becca Robbins, Colombian WriterPosted on Columbian.com: Nov. 12, 2022, 6:30 p.m.Updated: Nov 13, 2022, 12:12 p.m. Democrat Marie Gluesenkamp Perez has toppled Washington’s 3rd congressional district after new vote tallies from Clark and Thurston counties on Saturday show her fending off a late comeback bid by Republican Joe Kent. The race was announced by […]]]>

By Becca Robbins, Colombian Writer
Posted on Columbian.com: Nov. 12, 2022, 6:30 p.m.
Updated: Nov 13, 2022, 12:12 p.m.

Democrat Marie Gluesenkamp Perez has toppled Washington’s 3rd congressional district after new vote tallies from Clark and Thurston counties on Saturday show her fending off a late comeback bid by Republican Joe Kent.

The race was announced by The Associated Press, Seattle Times, New York Times, CNN, ABC and NBC late Saturday afternoon, with Perez leading by 4,621 votes. Perez had 154,169 votes, or 50.47%, while Kent had 149,548 votes, or 48.96%. Written votes accounted for 1,238 votes, or 0.62% of the 199,938 votes counted so far.

Perez, an auto shop owner and Skamania County resident, declared the victory in a statement, in which she called the race “an indicator of the direction of our politics and the strength of our democracy.”

“I am humbled and humbled by the vote of confidence the people of Southwestern Washington have given me and my campaign,” Perez wrote in the statement. “Until the end, experts and distant forecasters said that this race could not be won. They ruled out the possibility that a moderate Democrat focused on prioritizing the needs of this district rather than partisan scoring could win in a rural, working-class district.

Kent, who went to the general election with a belated wave of support in the August primary, did not experience a similar wave against Perez. On Saturday, he got just 338 votes over Perez, still leading by 4,621, according to the secretary of state’s website.

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Eli Crane set to win Arizona’s 2nd congressional district https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/eli-crane-set-to-win-arizonas-2nd-congressional-district/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 04:23:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/eli-crane-set-to-win-arizonas-2nd-congressional-district/ The recent redistricting meant new names were vying to represent many of Arizona’s districts, including the state’s 2nd congressional district. ARIZONA, United States — The Arizona election results are in! The new redistricting has new candidates vying to represent the state’s districts, including the state’s 2nd congressional district. The district is the 11th largest district […]]]>

The recent redistricting meant new names were vying to represent many of Arizona’s districts, including the state’s 2nd congressional district.

ARIZONA, United States — The Arizona election results are in!

The new redistricting has new candidates vying to represent the state’s districts, including the state’s 2nd congressional district.

The district is the 11th largest district in the country. It includes the Navajo Nation, the Hopi Reservation and the Gila River Indian Community. About 25% of its population is Native American.

Republican Eli Crane was declared the winner Thursday night by The Associated Press. At 9 p.m., Crane was ahead of his competitor by more than 22,000 votes.

Eli Crane (R)

Eli Crane, a U.S. Navy veteran, will run to represent Arizona’s 2nd congressional district in the 2022 Republican primary election.

Crane received a State Senator Wendy Rogers’ endorsement.

In his responses to Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey, Crane described himself as “an America First candidate who is pro-life, pro-Second Amendment and has the courage to take a stand against cancel culture and the radical left.

You can click here to visit Crane’s campaign website.

Decision 2022

Arizonans will head to the polls in November for the midterm elections. Here’s everything you need to know ahead of election night.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

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WLKY Hosts Debate with Kentucky’s 3rd Congressional District Candidates https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/wlky-hosts-debate-with-kentuckys-3rd-congressional-district-candidates/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 21:14:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/wlky-hosts-debate-with-kentuckys-3rd-congressional-district-candidates/ WLKY hosted a special Friday presentation for our Commitment 2022 coverage: A Debate with the Candidates of Kentucky’s 3rd Congressional District. You can watch the full debate in the player below: The candidates are Democrat Morgan McGarvey and Republican Stuart Ray. Mark Vanderhoff served as moderator. The live debate was produced in partnership with the […]]]>

WLKY hosted a special Friday presentation for our Commitment 2022 coverage: A Debate with the Candidates of Kentucky’s 3rd Congressional District. You can watch the full debate in the player below: The candidates are Democrat Morgan McGarvey and Republican Stuart Ray. Mark Vanderhoff served as moderator. The live debate was produced in partnership with the Louisville League of Women Voters. The League is a nonpartisan civic engagement organization. One of its main priorities is to educate and encourage voters to participate in elections. Here are the questions we asked. Each candidate had 90 seconds to answer:1. LET’S START WITH SOMETHING EVERY VOTER FEELS – HIGHER PRICES. WHAT DO YOU THINK HAS CAUSED OUR CURRENT INFLATION AND WHAT CAN CONGRESS DO ABOUT IT IF ANY?2. WHAT EFFORTS DO YOU SUPPORT TO REFORM THE TAX CODE AND DO YOU VOTE TO MAINTAIN OR END THE PRIOR ADMINISTRATION’S TAX CUTS?3. BEST ESTIMATES ARE THAT EACH SHOT VICTIM COSTS $900,000 IN KENTUCKY; IN ADDITION TO PERSONAL COSTS, THERE ARE HEALTH, INSURANCE AND LEGAL SYSTEM COSTS. WHAT WILL YOU PROPOSE AT CONGRESS LEVEL TO REDUCE ARMED VIOLENCE AND THESE COSTS?4. LET’S TALK ABOUT THE RIGHT TO ABORTION. DO YOU SUPPORT KENTUCKY’S CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT #2? AND DO YOU SUPPORT EITHER A NATIONAL ABORTION BAN OR A FEDERAL LAW GUARANTEEING THE RIGHT TO ABORTION? WHY OR WHY NOT?5. DO YOU APPROVE US SUPPORT FOR UKRAINE AGAINST RUSSIAN INVASION? AND WHAT ROLE SHOULD THE UNITED STATES PLAY IN INTERNATIONAL SITUATIONS LIKE THIS? 6. THE CHAMBER PASSED THE JOHN LEWIS ADVANCEMENT OF VOTING RIGHTS ACT AND THE FREEDOM TO VOTE ACT. HE IS WAITING FOR THE SENATE. DO YOU SUPPORT THE OBJECTIVES OF THESE BILLS, AND WHY OR WHY NOT?7. IMMIGRATION IS ALWAYS A HOT TOPIC, BUT BIPartisan REFORM HAS Escaped CONGRESSION. WHAT DO YOU SUPPORT TO DO TO SOLVE THIS PROBLEM?8. WHILE WE HOPE THE PANDEMIC AND VIRUS PROBLEMS ARE DIMINISHING, THE PREDICTIONS OF THE NEXT FLU SEASON ARE NOT POSITIVE. IN YOUR OPINION, WHAT ROLE SHOULD THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT HAVE DURING PANDEMICS AND OTHER HEALTH-RELATED DISASTERS?9. TORNADOES AND FLOODS COST KENTUCKY BILLIONS. SOME SAY CLIMATE CHANGE WILL INCREASE THE FREQUENCY AND SEVERITY OF NATURAL DISASTERS. DO YOU BELIEVE THIS, AND WHAT SHOULD CONGRESS DO TO ADDRESS LONG-TERM CLIMATE ISSUES?10. THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WAS ESTABLISHED BY REPUBLICAN PRESIDENT RICHARD NIXON AND APPROVED BY CONGRESS IN A BIPARTISAN VOTE. YET, THERE ARE NOW EFFORTS TO DISMANT IT. DO YOU AGREE WITH THESE EFFORTS? WHY OR WHY NOT?11. THE JANUARY 6 COMMISSION FINALIZES ITS WORK. DO YOU SUPPORT HIS EFFORTS? AND INCLUDE IN YOUR RESPONSE YOUR VIEWS ON THE EVENTS OF JANUARY 6 AND THEIR EFFECT ON OUR DEMOCRACY.12. WE HAVE SEEN OUTSIDE MONEY COMING INTO THE RACES IN KENTUCKY, WHAT SOME SAY IS THE RESULT OF THE CITIZENS UNITED CASE. WHAT KIND OF CAMPAIGN FINANCE REFORMS, IF ANY, DO YOU SUPPORT? 13. POLARIZATION IS EVIDENT AT ALL LEVELS OF OUR POLICIES, OUR COMMUNITIES… EVEN IN FAMILIES. WHAT CAN BE DONE TO BREAK THIS POLARIZATION?14. WHAT MAKES YOU MORE QUALIFIED TO REPRESENT THE 3RD CONGRESS DISTRICT THAN YOUR OPPONENT?15. SAY SOMETHING POSITIVE ABOUT YOUR OPPONENT.

WLKY hosted a special Friday presentation for our Commitment 2022 coverage: A Debate with the Candidates of Kentucky’s 3rd Congressional District.

You can watch the full debate in the player below:



The candidates are Democrat Morgan McGarvey and Republican Stuart Ray.

Mark Vanderhoff served as moderator.

The live debate was produced in partnership with the Louisville League of Women Voters. The League is a nonpartisan civic engagement organization. One of its main priorities is to educate and encourage voters to participate in elections.

Below are the questions we asked. Each candidate had 90 seconds to respond:

1. LET’S START WITH SOMETHING EVERY VOTER FEELS – HIGHER PRICES. What do you think has caused our current inflation and what can Congress do about it, if anything?

2. WHAT EFFORTS DO YOU SUPPORT TO REFORM THE TAX CODE AND WILL YOU VOTE TO MAINTAIN OR END THE PRIOR ADMINISTRATION’S TAX CUTS?

3. BEST ESTIMATES ARE THAT EACH SHOT VICTIM COSTS $900,000 IN KENTUCKY; IN ADDITION TO PERSONAL COSTS, THERE ARE HEALTH, INSURANCE AND LEGAL SYSTEM COSTS. WHAT WILL YOU PROPOSE AT THE CONGRESS LEVEL TO REDUCE ARMED VIOLENCE AND THESE COSTS?

4. TALK ABOUT THE RIGHT TO ABORTION. DO YOU SUPPORT KENTUCKY’S CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT #2? AND DO YOU SUPPORT EITHER A NATIONAL ABORTION BAN OR A FEDERAL LAW GUARANTEEING THE RIGHT TO ABORTION? WHY OR WHY NOT?

5. DO YOU APPROVE US SUPPORT FOR UKRAINE AGAINST RUSSIAN INVASION? AND WHAT ROLE SHOULD THE UNITED STATES PLAY IN INTERNATIONAL SITUATIONS LIKE THIS?

6. THE CHAMBER PASSED THE JOHN LEWIS ADVANCEMENT OF VOTING RIGHTS ACT AND THE FREEDOM TO VOTE ACT. HE IS WAITING FOR THE SENATE. DO YOU SUPPORT THE OBJECTIVES OF THESE BILLS, AND WHY OR WHY NOT?

7. IMMIGRATION IS STILL A HOT TOPIC, BUT BIPartisan REFORM HAS Escaped Congress. WHAT DO YOU SUPPORT TO DO TO ADDRESS THIS PROBLEM?

8. WHILE WE HOPE THE PANDEMIC AND VIRUS PROBLEMS ARE DIMINISHING, THE PREDICTIONS FOR THE NEXT FLU SEASON ARE NOT POSITIVE. What role do you think the federal government should have during pandemics and other health-related disasters?

9. TORNADOES AND FLOODS COST KENTUCKY BILLIONS. SOME SAY CLIMATE CHANGE WILL INCREASE THE FREQUENCY AND SEVERITY OF NATURAL DISASTERS. DO YOU BELIEVE IT, AND WHAT SHOULD CONGRESS DO TO ADDRESS LONG-TERM CLIMATE ISSUES?

10. THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WAS ESTABLISHED BY REPUBLICAN PRESIDENT RICHARD NIXON AND APPROVED BY CONGRESS IN A BI-PARTISAN VOTE. YET, THERE ARE NOW EFFORTS TO DISMANT IT. DO YOU AGREE WITH THESE EFFORTS? WHY OR WHY NOT?

11. THE JANUARY 6 COMMISSION FINALIZES ITS WORK. DO YOU SUPPORT HIS EFFORTS? AND INCLUDE IN YOUR RESPONSE YOUR OPINION ON THE EVENTS OF JANUARY 6 AND THEIR EFFECT ON OUR DEMOCRACY.

12. WE HAVE SEEN OUTSIDE MONEY INFLUENCING RACING IN KENTUCKY, WHAT SOME SAY IS THE RESULT OF THE UNITED CITIZENS CASE. WHAT KIND OF CAMPAIGN FINANCE REFORMS, IF ANY, DO YOU SUPPORT?

13. POLARIZATION IS EVIDENT AT ALL LEVELS OF OUR POLICIES, OUR COMMUNITIES… EVEN IN FAMILIES. WHAT CAN WE DO TO BREAK THIS POLARIZATION?

14. WHAT MAKES YOU MORE QUALIFIED TO REPRESENT THE 3DR CONGRESS DISTRICT THAN YOUR OPPONENT?

15. SAY SOMETHING POSITIVE ABOUT YOUR OPPONENT.

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I’ll put service before me, protect families https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ill-put-service-before-me-protect-families/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 22:45:55 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ill-put-service-before-me-protect-families/ Service above self. The men and women of our armed forces know a phrase or two, but perhaps none as significant and pervasive as this. When I made the decision to run for office in 2020, those three words and my family were the driving forces behind my choice to run for Congress in the […]]]>

Service above self. The men and women of our armed forces know a phrase or two, but perhaps none as significant and pervasive as this.

When I made the decision to run for office in 2020, those three words and my family were the driving forces behind my choice to run for Congress in the Second District. The same three words drove me to join the Marine Corps after graduating from the University of Minnesota, and that’s why my family and I chose to run again in 2022.

It was in this same sense of service that after attending North Hennepin Community College and then transferring to the U, I made the decision to become an officer in the Marine Corps and proudly served our country for nine years and during four overseas deployments.

Today, I live with my wife, Marie, and our two children, Elodie and Gabriel, in Prior Lake. I still serve in the Marine Corps Reserves and work to recruit the next generation of leaders to serve our country.

Since the last election, many of the conditions in our country have deteriorated. Our families, friends and neighbors are grappling with the effects of record inflation for 40 years. At the same time, supply chain disruptions have left mothers unable to source formula for their babies. Yet our leaders in Washington continue to recklessly escalate the problem.

Our plan is simple. We need sensible solutions that put parents and our communities first. We’ve seen the agenda that Democrats in Washington have implemented over the past two years, prioritizing their government-funded, special-interest-driven pet projects, while American families of all walks of life days are falling further and further behind. So instead of addressing the problem (Washington’s spending), the Democrats without a single Republican vote passed the “Inflation Reduction Act”, doing absolutely nothing to address inflation and the problems that Minnesotans feel every day. Their misleading prioritization of coastal elite projects is out of step with our Midwestern community values ​​and an affront to all.

Now our nation is at a crossroads. The current leaders in Washington have had total control over the federal government for the past two years, and look where that has gotten us.

Inflation, fuel prices and food prices are all at record highs. Real wage growth and social security payments are not keeping up with inflation. Older people and other people on fixed incomes lag even further behind.

We need to do more to strengthen supply lines, bolster social security, and protect our families who are seeing their dollars buy less at the grocery store.

My question for the people of Minnesota’s Second Congressional District is simple: Are you and your family better off than two years ago? I offer an alternative to the norm, a viable choice for change. We have the opportunity to turn the page, to act boldly.

Our problems require immediate resolution. I’m the Marine for work. Marie and I humbly ask for your support this November 8th.

Tyler Kistner is the Republican candidate for the United States House in Minnesota’s Second Congressional District.

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Editorial Approval: Francis Conole in the 22nd Congressional District https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/editorial-approval-francis-conole-in-the-22nd-congressional-district/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/editorial-approval-francis-conole-in-the-22nd-congressional-district/ Central New York has a rich history of electing Centrists to Congress who were intelligent, principled, and grounded in the challenges of serving our politically diverse community. Republican John Katko is the most recent leader to fit that description. Katko’s retirement means voters in central New York must choose a new representative in the 22nd […]]]>

Central New York has a rich history of electing Centrists to Congress who were intelligent, principled, and grounded in the challenges of serving our politically diverse community. Republican John Katko is the most recent leader to fit that description. Katko’s retirement means voters in central New York must choose a new representative in the 22nd congressional district.

The two candidates are largely unknown to voters beyond their party labels: Democrat Francis Conole, a Syracuse native and career Navy officer, and Republican/Conservative Brandon Williams, a Texas tech entrepreneur and transplanted into the Cayuga County. Both have lived most of their adult lives in other places. Neither has previously held political office.

When it comes to choosing the candidate sensitive to the center of New York and its values, it is not a contest. We endorse Conole for the 22nd congressional district.

Conole graduated from Westhill High School and then the US Naval Academy. 9/11 happened soon after, triggering deployments in Iraq and the Middle East. Conole then worked for two administrations as a political analyst at the Pentagon. He returned to Syracuse in 2019 and is a captain in the Naval Reserve.

Williams grew up in Dallas, served six years in the Navy on a nuclear submarine, then pursued a career in business. He built a home in Cayuga County in 2010 and moved there permanently in 2019. He describes himself as a Reagan Republican.

Candidates’ opinions on federal incentives for chipmaker Micron Technology are beginning to show their differences.

Katko was one of 24 Republicans who broke away from the party to vote for the Chips and Science Act. The law offers $52 billion in federal incentives to semiconductor makers to “relocate” production to the United States, plus a 25% investment tax credit on equipment. These two elements were key to Micron’s decision to locate a chip manufacturing plant in Onondaga County, promising $100 billion in investment and up to 9,000 direct and 41,000 indirect jobs over two decades. . It would be a historic reversal of fortune for a region that believed its industrial glory days were over.

Conole praises Katko’s votes with Democrats on the chip law and the infrastructure bill. If elected, Conole says he is ready to support the STEM education, housing, and transportation needs of the community as it grows around Micron.

Williams now says he’s all in favor of relocating manufacturing and welcomes Micron’s investment. This is a major about-face. In a letter to the Auburn Citizen published before Micron made his decision, he derisively criticized “moderate Republicans” and called the chip bill “corporate welfare” for a profitable business. He doubled down on that at an editorial board meeting, saying corporate welfare was okay when it was in the interest of national security. Williams misrepresents $200 billion more in House-authorized research spending; it was not funded by the Chip Bill.

Williams focused his campaign on federal overspending, inflation, crime, energy independence, school choice, and parental rights. His views lean heavily to the right. He thinks socialism is creeping into local school curricula, though he can’t cite any examples. His critique of public schools seems disconnected from an important community builder and source of local pride in central New York.

Console and Williams differ on just about every issue.

Conole supports abortion rights; Williams opposes abortion with narrow exceptions. Conole says he would protect Social Security and Medicare; Williams supports the House GOP’s platform of aggressive spending cuts, but says he would not cut Social Security and Medicare. Conole supports gun background checks, red flag laws, and assault weapon bans; Williams told a group that Democrats are after their guns. Conole would seek federal investment in housing to address urban poverty in Syracuse and Utica; Williams’ prescription is to grow the economy and give parents vouchers to send their children to private school.

Williams professes a desire to get away from the grievance policy, but he falls back on it when he claims that Conole wants to defund the police (which Conole denies). Williams’ disdain for bipartisanship and his criticism of Katko and other “moderate” Republicans as RINO is reason enough for us to pick Conole.

We’ll grant this: Unlike many Republican congressional candidates, Williams isn’t claiming the 2020 election was stolen. But he refuses to talk about the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, saying at one point, “I didn’t pay attention to it at the time.” It is beyond comprehension. Williams says it’s a distraction from wallet issues and unrelated to this campaign; we believe that free elections and the peaceful transfer of power are fundamental to our republic.

The New York center was fortunate to have Katko in the House chamber on January 6 and after, and for every other vote over the years to protect civil rights, support democracy and provide aid. federal government to the problems of central New York. The next time our representative is called upon to put the country above the party, who do you want to make the call?

We choose Conole, hands down.

Why we endorse

The purpose of an editorial endorsement is to provide a considered assessment of the choices voters face in an election. We offer editorial mentions to stimulate public conversation and promote civic engagement. Voting is a right and an obligation of citizenship. This part is up to you. Early voting begins Saturday, October 29 and ends Sunday, November 6. Election day is Tuesday, November 8. Read our Q&A on why we approve.

About Syracuse.com Editorials

Editorials represent the collective opinion of Advance Media New York’s Editorial Board. Our opinions are independent of media coverage. Read our mission statement. Members of the editorial board are Tim Kennedy, Trish LaMonte, Katrina Tulloch and Marie Morelli.

To respond to this editorial: Send a letter or comment to letters@syracuse.com. Read our submission guidelines.

If you have any questions about the Opinions and Editorials section, contact Marie Morelli, Editorial/Opinion Manager, at mmorelli@syracuse.com

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Maloney, Lawler race sees national attention, money, pouring into 17th congressional district https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/maloney-lawler-race-sees-national-attention-money-pouring-into-17th-congressional-district/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 09:16:05 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/maloney-lawler-race-sees-national-attention-money-pouring-into-17th-congressional-district/ The race to represent the 17e The congressional district has gone national, as national Republican super PACs pour millions into Assemblyman Mike Lawler’s bid to oust one of the GOP’s top targets: Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, who chairs the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. The DCCC, meanwhile, responded with a $600,000 media buy to shore up […]]]>

The race to represent the 17e The congressional district has gone national, as national Republican super PACs pour millions into Assemblyman Mike Lawler’s bid to oust one of the GOP’s top targets: Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, who chairs the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

The DCCC, meanwhile, responded with a $600,000 media buy to shore up the campaign of the five-term incumbent who is fighting for his political life in New York’s northern suburbs.

Republicans have made it a competitive race by painting a vision of suburban life that includes rampant crime and inflation-depleting bank accounts. That’s the message shared by gubernatorial candidate Lee Zeldin in his bid to oust Governor Kathy Hochul. They linked Maloney to state bail reform, based on a statement he made in favor of the reforms in 2018 when he lost a bid for the Democratic nomination for attorney general. of State.

Democrats have portrayed Lawler as a loyal follower of former President Donald Trump, who opposes elective abortion rights. They say Lawler misinterpreted Maloney’s role in the bail issue because he lost his bid for AG and never served in the state Legislature, which approved the reforms Maloney did not write.

Racial tensions: Maloney and Lawler argue over mail labeled ‘racist’ by civil rights leaders

Abortion: How Maloney and Lawler differ on abortion rights

Conservative party: Systematic racism is a lie, says party platform

So it goes in the new 17e Congressional District, which includes Rockland and Putnam counties, Westchester north of I-287, and three towns in southeast Dutchess. Polls in the new district gave Democrat Joe Biden a 10 percentage point victory in the 2020 presidential election.

National political superstars descended on the Hudson Valley to help raise funds in the final two weeks of the campaign.

On Sunday, First Lady Jill Biden will attend a Westchester fundraiser for Maloney at a private residence.

Former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie came to Rockland Country Club in Sparkill on Tuesday for a $150-a-plate breakfast while House Whip Steve Scalise, R-Louisiana, will headline a Lawler fundraiser in Wesley Hills on Thursday. Earlier this fall, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., appeared in Rye on Lawler’s behalf at a fundraiser in Rye.

At stake is control of the US House of Representatives, where Democrats hold a slim majority, and midterm elections traditionally favor the party no longer in power.

The amount spent on the race has skyrocketed in recent weeks, with around $7 million invested by the National Republican Campaign Committee and the Congressional Leadership Fund.

Maloney has raised nearly $5 million while Lawler’s fundraising has yet to top $1 million, according to campaign finance reports as of Sept. 30.

The national media has also arrived, with national TV camera crews and political reporters turning up Wednesday morning at the Bristal, an assisted living complex in an office park in Armonk. There, Maloney presented Democratic-backed policies to a room full of seniors. He touted the Inflation Reduction Act, which cut Medicare premiums, capped annual prescription drug costs at $2,000 a year, and empowered the federal government to negotiate drug prices for its Medicare program. .

“We’re finally going to take on these big pharma and negotiate prices,” Maloney said. “These savings are really going to add up because right now big pharma is getting away with murder.”

Federal bill for state issuance

After breakfast at Sparkill on Tuesday, Lawler spoke to the press about what he sees as New York State’s failure to tackle crime in the wake of the state’s bail reforms. state, which included fewer crimes requiring accused persons to deposit money to stay away. jail before their case is tried.

Assemblyman Mike Lawler and former NJ Governor Chris Christie comment on cash bail reform at Rockland Country Club in Sparkill on Tuesday, October 25, 2022.

Lawler supports a federal bill that would allow the federal government to intervene in New York’s criminal justice system. He would waive state immunity from lawsuits by victims of crime if they were injured by someone who had been charged with a crime but were released without posting a bullet awaiting their day at the court.

Lawler said the threat of lawsuits would bring New York state to its knees, forcing the state legislature to reform its bail laws to make the “dangerousness” of someone arrested for a crime an allowable consideration when a judge was considering setting bail. Lawler even wants crime victims to have the ability to sue elected officials who support bail reform.

He said the bill proposed by R-Staten Island Rep. Nicole Malliotakis would empower the federal government in states like New York to pressure the state to repeal its reforms.

“It will force New York State to choose what is more important: protecting the victims or the criminals,” Lawler said. “If New York State refuses to protect victims and keep its people safe, they should be held accountable, and the very politicians who allow it – they should be prosecuted.”

Statistics collide with bail rhetoric

Lawler railed against rising crime on Tuesday, citing statistics from New York City, located outside the 17e Congressional District. He said crime statistics showed an increase in murders, auto thefts and robberies in the city.

“Since cashless bail went into effect on January 1, 2020, index crimes in New York have increased by 36% and 40% of those released on non-cash bail for criminal offenses have been re-arrested” , did he declare. “It was one disastrous political decision after the next.”

As for the 17e Congressional District Lawler said, “We have seen a slight increase in the number of murders. We have seen an increase in the number of car thefts. We have seen an increase in drugs and gang activity in our communities.

It’s unclear where Lawler got his crime data.

The state’s crime statistics for the four suburban counties in its district – Westchester, Rockland, Putnam and Dutchess – show an overall decline in crime from 2020 to 2021, according to the Department of Criminal Justice Services. State.

In those four counties, listed crime — which includes both violent crime and property crime — fell 11% from 17,128 to 15,276, according to the state report. Scheduled crimes are eight crimes that all jurisdictions report under federal crime reporting standards.

In 2021, murders in these four Hudson Valley counties decreased by 35%, from 42 in 2020 to 27 in 2021. Auto thefts in the four counties fell by 6%, while crimes against goods fell 12%.

Tax Watch asked Lawler’s campaign if it had any statistics to support Lawler’s claims that crime was on the rise in the suburbs. Spokesman Bill O’Reilly said he would research the matter, but did not provide any statistics.

U.S. Representative Sean Patrick Maloney D-NY, center, attends a clean water roundtable, at the Nyack Center in Nyack, Oct. 21, 2022. At left is Legislator Harriet Cornell, and at right is Joe Rand, a village administrator.

U.S. Representative Sean Patrick Maloney D-NY, center, attends a clean water roundtable, at the Nyack Center in Nyack, Oct. 21, 2022. At left is Legislator Harriet Cornell, and at right is Joe Rand, a village administrator.

Maloney acknowledged that he knew commuters visiting New York who told him they felt less safe, noting the rise in homelessness on city streets.

“None of us are saying we don’t have to worry about crime or an increase in crime in the city,” Maloney said. “But look, Lawler is trying to exploit the problem and raise concerns to win an election.”

Soon it will be up to voters to decide, with early voting starting on Saturday and Election Day on November 8. The nation will watch.

Follow David McKay Wilson on Twitter @davidmckay415.

Subscribers can sign up for its weekly newsletter. Read his chronicles in the archives.

This article originally appeared on Rockland/Westchester Journal News: Maloney, Lawler target of Republican and Democratic national attention

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Adam Smith vs. Doug Basler: US Congressional District 9 race https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/adam-smith-vs-doug-basler-us-congressional-district-9-race/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 18:46:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/adam-smith-vs-doug-basler-us-congressional-district-9-race/ In Congressional District 9’s race for United States Representative, incumbent Adam Smith will face Doug Basler in the Nov. 8 general election. Smith (D) finished with 55.21% of the vote (78,272 votes) in the August 2 primary and Basler (R) finished with 20.56% of the vote (29,144 votes). King County Elections sent ballots to registered […]]]>

In Congressional District 9’s race for United States Representative, incumbent Adam Smith will face Doug Basler in the Nov. 8 general election.

Smith (D) finished with 55.21% of the vote (78,272 votes) in the August 2 primary and Basler (R) finished with 20.56% of the vote (29,144 votes).

King County Elections sent ballots to registered voters Oct. 19 and will release the first round of results at 8:15 p.m. on election night.

The Journalist contacted both candidates and asked them four relevant questions about the election. Each was allocated 2,000 words for their responses.

Congressional District 9 includes Renton, Mercer Island, and Federal Way as well as other towns from Tacoma to Bellevue.

ADAM SMITH

What do you see as the three most critical issues in the district and how do you hope to address them?

Economic inequality is one of the most critical issues affecting the 9th arrondissement. Millions of Americans find it difficult, if not impossible, to afford basic necessities like housing, child care and health care. The cost of renting or buying a home in Puget Sound has skyrocketed, far outpacing pay raises for people. This is why I support the expansion of affordable housing supply, the universal availability of housing vouchers and investment in holistic permanent supportive housing. I am a co-sponsor of the Housing Infrastructure Act, which would invest $70 billion to repair social housing and $45 billion to build new units to address the shortage of affordable options. I strongly support expanding and strengthening the low-income housing tax credit to better serve communities in need.

Behavioral health is another critical issue facing the district. There is a significant shortage of options for people in mental health crisis to receive the immediate and long-term care they need. That’s why I introduced the Behavioral Health Crisis Centers Act, which would provide access to funding for states, cities and counties, and tribal governments to build, operate and expand one-stop behavioral health crisis care centers. One-stop behavioral health crisis care centers provide critical crisis stabilization services and holistic services to connect individuals to the services they need, such as housing, job training, or legal services.

For too many people, the barriers to education or acquiring the skills needed to succeed are insurmountable. Unfortunately, our current education system focuses too much on supporting only four-year colleges and universities.

I have long advocated for increased funding for community and technical colleges and have supported increased investments in paid workforce training opportunities such as registered apprenticeship programs and workplace apprenticeship programs. work. These programs create pathways to high-quality, in-demand jobs for individuals. I’ve also been a leader in Congress, advocating for investments in comprehensive support services and stipends for individuals in workforce training programs and two-year education programs to support themselves. ensure they have the help they need to cover day-to-day living costs such as housing, food, and transportation.

Most recently, I introduced the Community and Technical Colleges Investment Act, which would allow states to offer tuition-free community and technical colleges and expand comprehensive support services, including housing, food and transportation, which are essential to help students complete their studies. programs. Across the country, everyone should have the opportunity to pursue education and professional training programs without being burdened with debt.

What is your life philosophy and how can you apply it to district affairs?

I believe everyone should have economic opportunities. I saw this first hand early in my life with my father. As a ramp agent and union member at SeaTac Airport, he earned a decent salary that could afford him housing and an education.

Unfortunately, the exponential increase in income inequality has led to wages that do not keep up with the basic cost of living. Many workers with good jobs in the 9th arrondissement can barely afford to live here. That’s why I’m focused on creating large-scale economic opportunity and reducing the concentration of wealth in this country that has left far too many working people unaffordable.

What will you do in your representative role to support and strengthen the district?

I believe that one of the most fundamental aspects of my work as a representative is to provide services to constituents and to engage directly with constituents. I constantly meet with community stakeholders, organizations and constituents to identify problems, find solutions, and then achieve results in any way possible. Whether it’s advocating for specific legislation, securing federal funding for the district, helping constituents solve an issue, or bringing stakeholders together to solve an issue, working collaboratively with constituents and community organizations allows me to to be an effective representative.

What is special about the neighborhood and what improvements could you make?

As a longtime resident of the 9th arrondissement, it remains my greatest honor to represent an area where I grew up and where Sara and I raised our family. This neighborhood is special because it is home to an extremely diverse group of communities; this diversity makes the neighborhood better.

In addition to battling economic inequality, the district and the entire state of Washington are seeing firsthand the growing impacts of climate change. We need to accelerate our efforts to move away from fossil fuels and decarbonize all sectors of our economy.

This will require coordinated action from local, state, and federal governments, communities, and the private sector, to make the investments and actions needed to make this transition just.

Although a challenge, this green transition offers an opportunity to create jobs in the region, improve public health, reduce energy prices and promote resilience.

DOUG BASLER

What do you see as the three most critical issues in the district and how do you hope to address them?

Our biggest problems:

Inflation and cost of living — This is directly linked to runaway government spending without sufficient revenue to cover deficits. This means the Federal Reserve has to print money to make up the difference and simple economics tells us that this devalues ​​money that is already in circulation. This must stop now, I will fight for a balanced federal budget and sound fiscal policies that strengthen the dollar and slow inflation. In addition, the overrestriction of our energy sector is the cause of the huge increase in gasoline and diesel prices, and Washington State is about to add up to 46 cents per gallon of additional taxes in January. Virtually everything we buy comes by truck, train and boat. All are mostly diesel powered and when energy prices rise everything becomes more expensive. I will use my office to work on reversing the situation. Affordable prices for energy, food and housing are my top priority.

Crime and homelessness — It’s time to restore our justice system by enforcing our laws and prosecuting criminals so that our families, our children, our neighborhoods and our businesses are safe. Anyone can see that the Democratic policy of overfunding and overrestricting the police is a disaster.

My business office has been broken into five times by the same person! Our neighborhood is full of businesses with plywood where the glass used to be. We have all seen brazen thefts in our local businesses. I will fight to change that from day one.

Parents’ rights — It should be obvious to everyone that parents are THE main actor in the education of their children. It is absolutely UN-AMERICAN to call parents “terrorists” for attending school board meetings, voicing their concerns, and working for change. In our Republic, we have all guaranteed our rights to speak freely and seek government redress for grievances (1st Amendment). I will fight to protect all our rights and for families to raise their children according to their own values.

What is your life philosophy and how can you apply it to district affairs?

I believe that every human being has intrinsic worth and purpose. I love America because here, like no other nation on earth, we all have the right to express that worth and that gift and to be what we are willing to work hard for. I am committed to protecting these rights, privileges and opportunities for all of us here in the 9th arrondissement.

What will you do in your representative role to support and strengthen the district?

I will work to protect our families, our schools and our businesses. Protect individual rights and ensure that America remains a land of freedom and justice for all.

What is special about the neighborhood and what improvements could you make?

The 9th district is the best borough in the United States. We are incredibly diverse. We have an incredible technology sector, robust manufacturing and excellent service industries. We are characterized by vibrant neighborhoods, amazing small businesses and great schools.

All of this is now threatened by record inflation, rapidly rising gas and energy prices, and a huge spike in violence and property crime. I am committed to protecting our unique culture, prosperity and way of life. We must hold our current elected officials to account and select new leaders who will put our community first rather than special interests.

I will work for you and your interests as my main mission.


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