Congressional District – Shaughnessy For Congress http://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 15:35:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4.png Congressional District – Shaughnessy For Congress http://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ 32 32 Regan Deering wins 13th congressional district GOP primary https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/regan-deering-wins-13th-congressional-district-gop-primary/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 15:35:09 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/regan-deering-wins-13th-congressional-district-gop-primary/ ]]>

title=wpil_keyword_linkcongressional district, according to The Associated Press.” title=”Regan Deering won the Republican primary in the 13th congressional district, according to The Associated Press.” loading=”lazy”/>

Regan Deering won the Republican primary in the 13th congressional district, according to The Associated Press.

It took a few days, but the Associated Press declared the winner of the Republican primary for the 13th congressional district, which was changed to now include a strip of St. Clair and Madison counties.

Regan Deering won the primary narrowly beating Jesse Reising, according to the AP.

Since Tuesday evening, the two candidates were neck and neck in the vote count.

Deering had 14,764 votes, or 34.7%, with about 97.2% of the votes counted as of 5:59 p.m. Thursday when the AP called the race for Deering.

Reising, who conceded the race with a Facebook post, had 14,093 votes, or 33.1%, as of Thursday night. Two other GOP candidates, Matt Hausman, with 10,084 votes, and Terry Martin, with 3,646 votes, followed the two favorites.

Through Facebook posts, Deering thanked his supporters and said, “We can’t survive the far left’s radical agenda any longer.”

Deering will face Democratic candidate Nikki Budzinski in the Nov. 8 election.

Budzinski was declared the winner Tuesday night in her race against David Palmer.

The 13th Congressional District was redesigned last year by Democrats and now includes portions of Metro East that were previously part of U.S. Republican Mike Bost’s 12th Congressional District. Belleville, East St. Louis, and parts of Edwardsville and Collinsville are now in the 13th District, which runs through central Illinois to include parts of Springfield, Decatur, and Champaign-Urbana.

Deering, 46, of Decatur, said in a questionnaire to the Democratic candidate from Belleville that she was a community advocate and philanthropist.

Budzinski, 45, of Springfield is a former senior adviser to Governor JB Pritzker and served during his first year as governor. His role included presenting Pritzker’s policies to residents of southern Illinois.

Neither Budzinski nor Deering ran for public office prior to this race.

The 13th District includes parts of St. Clair, Madison, Champaign, Macon, Piatt, and Sangamon counties, and all of Macoupin County. That seat had been open since incumbent Republican U.S. Representative Rodney Davis had to run in the newly created 15th congressional district on Tuesday. He lost the GOP primary race to U.S. Representative Mary Miller on Tuesday.

The results of Tuesday’s primary are considered unofficial and will become final after being certified by election officials later this month.

12th Congressional District primary results

Homer “Chip” Markel was declared the winner of the Democratic primary in the 12th congressional district on Wednesday in the race to face incumbent U.S. Representative Mike Bost in the November election, according to the AP.

Markel, had 10,974 votes, or 56.8%, to beat Joshua Qualls, who had 8,341 votes, or 43.2%, according to the AP’s report of about 99% of the votes counted.

Markel, 61, of Carbondale, is retired from the Illinois Department of Corrections.

Bost, of Murphysboro, was unopposed in the Republican primary. He has served in Congress since January 2015.

All or part of 34 counties make up the 12th congressional district: Alexander, Clark, Clay, Clinton, Coles, Crawford, Cumberland, Edwards, Effingham, Franklin, Gallatin, Hamilton, Hardin, Jackson, Jasper, Jefferson, Johnson, Lawrence, Marion , Massac, Monroe, Perry, Pope, Pulaski, Randolph, Richland, Saline, St. Clair, Union, Wabash, Washington, Wayne, White and Williamson.

Mike Koziatek joined the Belleville News-Democrat in 1998 as associate editor and is now a reporter covering the Belleville area. He graduated from Marquette University in Milwaukee and is a native of St. Louis.

]]>
Candidates’ Forum for the 6th Congressional District https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/candidates-forum-for-the-6th-congressional-district/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 08:30:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/candidates-forum-for-the-6th-congressional-district/ A Candidates Forum featuring primary candidates for the 6th Congressional District seat currently held by Derek Kilmer is scheduled for 7 p.m. on July 18. The League of Women Voters Tacoma-Pierce, Kitsap and Jefferson Counties will host the forum featuring Kilmer and challengers Chris Binns, Todd Bloom, Elizabeth Kreiselmaier, Tom Triggs and Rebecca Parson. They […]]]>

A Candidates Forum featuring primary candidates for the 6th Congressional District seat currently held by Derek Kilmer is scheduled for 7 p.m. on July 18.

The League of Women Voters Tacoma-Pierce, Kitsap and Jefferson Counties will host the forum featuring Kilmer and challengers Chris Binns, Todd Bloom, Elizabeth Kreiselmaier, Tom Triggs and Rebecca Parson.

They will be on the ballot in the August 2 primary elections. The first two primaries will narrow the contest to two candidates for the November 8 general election.

The 6th Congressional District encompasses most of the Olympic Peninsula, most of the Kitsap Peninsula, and most of the city of Tacoma.

The forum will be broadcast live on TV Washington, and the local channel can be found at https://tvw.org/channel-locator/.

Alternatively, viewers can register to access the forum via Zoom at https://bit.ly/3ndpP0p.

Questions from candidates can be submitted to
[email protected]; note that the questions are for the 6th congressional district forum.

Concise and unbiased questions directly related to the position and its policies will be given priority, and similar questions will be combined.

“We strive to ensure that the questions reflect a broad range of concerns from multiple precincts in our district,” the league said in a news release.

For more information, contact the League of Women Voters-Jefferson County at [email protected]



]]>
James Judge sues for disqualification from the CD 14 ballot https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/james-judge-sues-for-disqualification-from-the-cd-14-ballot/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 18:04:59 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/james-judge-sues-for-disqualification-from-the-cd-14-ballot/ Republican james judge sued the Division of Elections for a decision to disqualify his campaign for Congress. State Election Officials Friday threw out the polling judge in Florida’s 14th congressional district, saying he signed a local candidate oath instead of the documents required for federal candidates. But attorneys for the judge allege that state law […]]]>

Republican james judge sued the Division of Elections for a decision to disqualify his campaign for Congress.

State Election Officials Friday threw out the polling judge in Florida’s 14th congressional district, saying he signed a local candidate oath instead of the documents required for federal candidates.

But attorneys for the judge allege that state law merely notates the language of an oath that applicants must sign, and the oath signed by the judge should be accepted. Beyond that, the judge submitted his form days before the June 17 qualifying deadline and should have had a chance to resolve any issues, his lawyers say.

“At no time before noon on June 17, 2022 (the end of the qualification period) was the applicant informed of the department’s assertion that the applicant could somehow be disqualified because ‘He failed to file a ‘Federal Office of Candidate Oath with Party Affiliation’ form,” reads a complaint filed with the Leon County Circuit Court.

Meanwhile, his candidacy went from Active to Qualified Elections Division without a word of any bureaucratic issues, according to lawyers for the judge.

The Republican candidate sued the Secretary of State Byrd cordthe Elections Division, Hillsborough County Supervisor of Elections Craig Latimer and Pinellas County Supervisor of Elections Julie Marcusand wants his name on the ballot again.

“The electorate should not be denied the opportunity to vote for the plaintiff,” the lawsuit states.

Until his disqualification, Judge appeared to be a frontrunner for the Republican nomination to challenge the Democratic U.S. Representative. Catherine Beaver in Florida’s 14th congressional district. He collected important mentions in the race, including of the former US Representative. Ted Yoho. He also raised the most money among Republicans in the race at the end of the first quarter, having declared more than $122,000 in donations and had nearly $75,000 in cash at the end of March.

The race remains a tough climb for whoever secures the GOP nomination. Under a new congress map signed by the governor Ron DeSantisdistrict moves west and turns bluer, with 58.8% of voters under new lines supporting the Democrat Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election against 39.72% who favored the Republicans Joe Biden.

The trial of the judge seeking to reverse the ballot in CD 14 comes as Democrats try to hit another Republican, Jerry Torres, out of it. The Florida Democratic Party and other plaintiffs for follow-up Friday to have Torres disqualified, alleging that Torres had wrongfully had his candidate oath stamped by a notary here while he was in Africa.


Post views:
0

]]>
Inslee asks voters to reject 3rd District candidates Joe Kent and Vicki Kraft https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/inslee-asks-voters-to-reject-3rd-district-candidates-joe-kent-and-vicki-kraft/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 00:52:47 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/inslee-asks-voters-to-reject-3rd-district-candidates-joe-kent-and-vicki-kraft/ Brennen Kauffman / The Daily News Washington Governor Jay Inslee urges Republican voters in Southwest Washington to reject Joe Kent and State Rep. Vicki Kraft in the upcoming congressional primary over their statements and actions questioning the result 2020 elections. In an interview with the Daily News on Thursday, the Democratic governor named the two […]]]>

Brennen Kauffman / The Daily News

Washington Governor Jay Inslee urges Republican voters in Southwest Washington to reject Joe Kent and State Rep. Vicki Kraft in the upcoming congressional primary over their statements and actions questioning the result 2020 elections.

In an interview with the Daily News on Thursday, the Democratic governor named the two Republican candidates a “clear and present danger to democracy.” Kent, R-Yacolt, and Kraft, R-Vancouver, are two of eight candidates vying to unseat incumbent Rep. Jamie Herrera Beutler of Washington’s 3rd congressional district.

Both candidates have questioned election results nationally and for Washington state in particular throughout their campaign appearances and pushed to question the state’s 2020 election count.

“We have candidates for the United States Congress who are part of an ongoing insurgency to ignore our election results. We call on all good Republicans and independents to come to the aid of democracy and reject those candidates who refuse to accept the results of the last election,” Inslee said.

No widespread voter fraud was seen in Washington, especially on the scale needed to overturn the result for a reliable Democratic state. Joe Biden received about 800,000 more votes from Washingtonians than Donald Trump in the 2020 election.

Kent has signed several lawsuits filed by the Washington Election Integrity Coalition United questioning Washington’s votes in the election. One of the most significant lawsuits was dismissed by the Washington State Supreme Court and the court fined the coalition and its attorney $28,000 for making baseless and unsubstantiated claims.

Kent told the Daily News on Friday that calling for election audits and opposing mail-in voting was not the same as an insurrection.

“People should be able to question the way our elections are going. Inslee is an elected official, he should want to make sure we have full confidence and transparency in our elections,” Kent said.

Kraft did not respond to phone calls or emails from the Daily News seeking comment on Inslee’s statements Saturday afternoon.

Kraft remains an active state representative, representing Vancouver and Clark County in District 17. Inslee acknowledged that it was unusual for him to call an incumbent elected official a threat to democracy and said that he had made these statements knowingly.

“These candidates who refuse to honor our votes, which they both did, are a clear and present danger to democracy and I am here to raise the red flag,” Inslee said.

Kent and Kraft aren’t the only two people in the race to have questioned the state election results. In a video posted to her campaign website, Republican candidate Heidi St. John claimed that mail-in ballots in Washington have been “rife with fraud” since Dino Rossi lost the recount for the gubernatorial race. in 2004.

St. John added that the solution to mail-in ballots was for more Republicans to sign up and vote.

Other candidates running for the 3rd congressional district are Oliver Black of the American Solidarity Party of Longview; Chris Byrd, an independent from Toutle; Leslie French, a Republican from Vancouver; Marie Gluesenkamp Perez, a Democrat from Washougal; and Davy Ray, a Democrat from Stevenson.

]]>
Palazzo and Ezell head to runoff in Mississippi’s 4th congressional district primary – Ballotpedia News https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/palazzo-and-ezell-head-to-runoff-in-mississippis-4th-congressional-district-primary-ballotpedia-news/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 01:19:49 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/palazzo-and-ezell-head-to-runoff-in-mississippis-4th-congressional-district-primary-ballotpedia-news/ Incumbents Steven Palazzo and Mike Ezell are running in the June 28 Republican primary runoff for Mississippi’s 4th congressional district. In the June 7 primary, Palazzo received 31.6% of the vote, while Ezell received 25.1%. Both candidates qualified for a second round as no candidate received more than 50% of the votes. Palazzo was first […]]]>

Incumbents Steven Palazzo and Mike Ezell are running in the June 28 Republican primary runoff for Mississippi’s 4th congressional district. In the June 7 primary, Palazzo received 31.6% of the vote, while Ezell received 25.1%. Both candidates qualified for a second round as no candidate received more than 50% of the votes.

Palazzo was first elected to the United States House in 2010. From 2006 to 2011, he served in the Mississippi House of Representatives. Palazzo said voters should choose him because of his congressional experience, his connections at the state, local and federal levels, and his seat on the House Appropriations Committee. Palazzo said, “If we lose that seat of credits, we won’t get it back.” Palazzo also said, “I’m the proven one. I’ve worked hard for southern Mississippi for over 12 years. Look, $26 billion for 26 ships since 2011, fighting for our men and women in uniform, helping to secure funds for the wall on our southern border. I think I’ve been an effective legislator for southern Mississippi. Louisiana Rep. Steve Scalise (R) and National Right to Life have endorsed Palazzo’s re-election.

Ezell is the sheriff of Jackson County, a position he was first elected to in 2014. Ezell has campaigned to protect the 2nd Amendment, secure the border and grow the economy. Ezell said voters should choose him because of his law enforcement background: “From the chaos and crisis on our southern border to the crime and drugs that harm so many communities across our country. , it will take someone in Congress with real law enforcement. experience to tackle these issues that affect us all. The candidates who lost in the June 7 primary – Clay Wagner, Brice Wiggins, Carl Boyanton, Raymond Brooks and Kidron Peterson – endorsed Ezell.

Allegations that Palazzo previously misused campaign funds were an issue during the primary, with Ezell saying: “Steven Palazzo has been under the cloud of an ethics investigation.” In 2020, the Congressional Ethics Office released a report that the allegations should be further investigated because “there are substantial grounds to believe that Representative Palazzo converted funds for use staff to pay for expenses that were not legitimate and verifiable campaign expenses attributable to bona fide campaign or political purposes. Palazzo denied the allegations. Palazzo’s campaign spokesperson said, “All of this from the beginning was political, created by political opponents of Congressman Palazzo…We have long been prepared to put this behind us and are confident that this will be resolved in favor of Congressman Palazzo. House Ethics Committee is underway.

Independent race rating agencies eye general election Solid Republican.

]]>
Election results in Alabama, Virginia, Georgia and DC https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/election-results-in-alabama-virginia-georgia-and-dc/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 03:50:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/election-results-in-alabama-virginia-georgia-and-dc/ Katie Britt speaks to supporters Tuesday night in Montgomery, Alabama after securing the nomination of Alabama’s Republican Senate nominee. (Dill Butch/AP) Cheers erupted at Katie Britt’s campaign headquarters in Montgomery as she became Alabama’s Republican candidate for the Senate on Tuesday night. “When we came into this race nobody thought it was possible,” Britt said. […]]]>
Katie Britt speaks to supporters Tuesday night in Montgomery, Alabama after securing the nomination of Alabama’s Republican Senate nominee. (Dill Butch/AP)

Cheers erupted at Katie Britt’s campaign headquarters in Montgomery as she became Alabama’s Republican candidate for the Senate on Tuesday night.

“When we came into this race nobody thought it was possible,” Britt said. Retired GOP Sen. Richard Shelby’s former chief of staff was late to the start of the race. “Unless you were related to be in or in a very small circle, you didn’t think it could be done.”

Britt was favored to win in the second round against Rep. Mo Brooks after receiving the most votes in the May primary.

“One thing is clear is that Alabama has spoken. We want new blood, we want fresh blood,” she said. “We want someone who will fight for our conservative Christian values. , who will fight for the freedom and liberty that this nation was founded on and who will fight for this American dream for the next generation and the next.”

Britt made a long list of thanks, including to Shelby, the people of Alabama, the crowd at her headquarters, family and friends. She also briefly thanked former President Trump for “helping to wrap up [the election] in style.

“People all over Alabama are missing his America First program,” Britt said of Trump endorsing the Republican establishment nominee in the 11th hour. “We are going to go to the United States Senate to fight every day. “

Trump has become a presence in the race after first endorsing Brooks, one of his most staunch allies in the House, then rescinding that endorsement after Brooks’ campaign began to struggle. Trump accused Brooks of ‘waking up’ after Brooks told a crowd at a Trump rally to move on to the 2020 election. As Britt gained momentum, Trump endorsed the candidate who he said was “in no way qualified” for the job.

The episode turned into a public brawl between the former president and Brooks, who promoted Trump’s 2020 campaign plots. Trump further embarrassed Brooks by saying he “wanted him back ever since…but I can’t give it to her!”

Brooks lashed out in turn, telling an AL.com reporter that the former president had “no loyalty to anyone or anything other than himself.”

Outside Vaughn Park Church east of downtown Montgomery, voters who spoke to CNN were divided on the power of Trump’s approval.

For Elise and Will Bone, Trump’s support is what put them above Britt.

“She’s young and I love what she stands for,” Elise told CNN. When asked if she and her husband had ever considered voting for Brooks, Will chimed in. “I like what he said,” Will said. “But Trump doesn’t support it.”

But not everyone voted for Britt because of Trump. Susannah Cleveland has been behind Britt since day one.

“She’s relatable, she’s a mom like me, I know her personally and I think she’s a great person,” Cleveland said. “I don’t trust Mo; I think Katie will be the best.

LeeAnn Duggar came to vote with her daughter. She supported Brooks, because she says he is more conservative than Britt. Duggar said his opinion of Brooks did not change after Trump rescinded his endorsement.

]]>
One race followed Trump, the other did not. Why two coastal congressional districts separated. | Palmetto Politics https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/one-race-followed-trump-the-other-did-not-why-two-coastal-congressional-districts-separated-palmetto-politics/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/one-race-followed-trump-the-other-did-not-why-two-coastal-congressional-districts-separated-palmetto-politics/ MYRTLE BEACH — Four miles from the neon signs of the boardwalk, Congressman Tom Rice prepared to meet his fate. Surrounded by several dozen supporters and a battery of national television cameras, Rice focused on the people who supported him for more than a year after his polarizing vote to impeach then-President Donald Trump. It […]]]>

MYRTLE BEACH — Four miles from the neon signs of the boardwalk, Congressman Tom Rice prepared to meet his fate.

Surrounded by several dozen supporters and a battery of national television cameras, Rice focused on the people who supported him for more than a year after his polarizing vote to impeach then-President Donald Trump. It was the last night of a grueling campaign to defend his seat.

The rice failed.

Russell Fry, a South Carolina state legislator and Trump’s hand-picked candidate to oust Rice from office, had won the coveted GOP nomination for the 7th congressional district in a landslide.

Fry would celebrate where Rice was not.

“Today the conservatives of the Republican Party won,” Fry said on his election night at the Tiki Bar on 8th Avenue, not far from Rice’s joyless party. “Today Donald Trump won.”

Flip that with what was happening just 95 miles south in suburban Mount Pleasant inside a white tent on the 18th hole of a golf course.

Nancy Mace was celebrating her victory by defending her 1st congressional district where Republicans rejected both Trump and his endorsed candidate, Katie Arrington.

“I promised when I ran in 2020 that I would be an independent voice,” Mace said to cheers. “I promised not to toe the party line.”

So why did one House Republican in South Carolina survive Trump’s wrath while the other fell in last week’s primary?

It starts with the districts themselves and how each offers a unique window into the attitudes of two distinct voting blocs within the modern Republican Party: the suburban, well-educated 1st District and the working-class, agrarian 7th District.

MAGA country vs club country

Both congressional districts border the Atlantic Ocean and are centered around two major population centers: Myrtle Beach in the 7th and Charleston in the 1st.

Both have also traditionally been represented by conservative politicians. But that’s where the differences end and the nuance begins.

Where the 1st District is defined by large swaths of a suburban and wealthy-retired class as far south as Hilton Head Island, the 7th District stretches beyond the Myrtle Beach and county limits from Horry to more rural pockets of the state around Florence and the Pee Dee area, home to some of Palmetto State’s poorest counties.

When it comes to politics, though both districts are reliably Republican, the type of GOP voters who live there couldn’t be more different.

While most 1st District voters have historically elected Republicans with a more independent and libertarian streak, 7th District voters are drawn to GOP candidates who have come to embrace Trump’s brand of politics that speaks to what voters in this disgruntled region often want to do it themselves. : Breaking the mold of Washington, DC, and speaking tough to those they think deserve it.

“The 7th District is much more of a Trump-style district than the 1st District,” said Matt Moore, a former SC GOP chairman who worked as a senior adviser on Fry’s campaign.

“In fact, the 7th District is one of the most pro-Trump districts in the Southeast, if not America,” he added.

In 2020, Trump won the district by seven points more than in the Charleston-rooted Lowcountry, sparking renewed rural enthusiasm.


Trump tells SC supporters to hunt rivals in June 14 primary, his birthday

Between 2019 and 2021, attendance at GOP meetings in Chesterfield County increased by 420%, according to data provided by the Republican Party of South Carolina.

In Dillon County, participation increased by 400%. In Darlington, it was 333%. And where turnout was down statewide in the 2022 primaries, rural counties in the 7th District saw turnout rise.

Darlington County Republican Party Chairman JD Chaplin points to the 2020 presidential election as an inflection point.

“That’s when a ton of people who had never voted before showed up to vote for Trump. And you can see that. They didn’t vote against it. They wanted to push that button. They wanted to vote for Trump,” Chaplin said.

Fry’s victory was a stunning surprise based purely on the huge margin. He garnered 51% of the vote in the seven-man ranking and avoided a runoff; Rice was far behind with 25%.

The story of Trump’s influence in the 1st District is very different. He won the region by 13 points in 2016 but saw his margins nearly halved in 2020, beating Biden by just 6 points.

Sign up for updates!

Get the latest policy news from The Post and Courier delivered to your inbox.

Importantly, some observers around the state have said that, unlike Rice, Mace did not vote to impeach Trump.

The different Trump factors

Both Rice and Mace have faced major challenges from the GOP right flank for perceived transgressions against Trump, who last fall called on “good and smart” Republicans to run against them.

Rice found himself facing a political tribunal in his home state after voting to impeach Trump for instigating the deadly Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol. Rice was later censured by the SC GOP for his vote.

Mace, on the other hand, became one of Trump’s most vocal Republican critics in the aftermath of the riot when she told national media that “Trump’s entire legacy had been wiped out” by the chaos of that day. -the. She also voted to certify the results of the 2020 election.

Those accolades — slight as they were — allowed Fry to distill his message into tight slogans that spoke of Rice’s betrayal, such as when he implored his supporters at a March 12 Trump rally in Florence to “impeach Tom Rice”.

For Arrington, it was a tougher challenge.

In her opening address to voters in a 2-minute video, Arrington had to stick to a broader message when she said Mace “sold out President Trump,” later going so far as to state that Mace was “the Liz Cheney of the South”.


Mace and Arrington agree on

Rob Godfrey, a former spokesman for former Gov. Nikki Haley, said it wasn’t just the impeachment vote itself, but it was how Fry could talk about it more fully freely that was doing a winning question in the 7th.

“Not only does such a deciding vote land with a punch, but for Tom Rice, it landed with a knockout punch,” Godfrey said.

In the 1st, Mace also had help defending his turf in a way that Rice didn’t. At least nine conservative groups, including six super PACs, have spent nearly $2 million trying to sway Republican voters with direct mail, TV ads, digital spots and text messages.

The majority of these messages were either for Mace or against Arrington, and when they hit Arrington it was mainly over two issues: the suspension of her security clearance while working at the Department of Defense and her vote at the State House in 2017 to raise the gas tax.

The gas tax messages were particularly effective, according to the Mace campaign, as they landed in mailboxes and played on television at a time when inflation was soaring and gas prices continued to climb ahead of the summer beach season – a major economic driver along the coast.

“But we’ve also seen a lot of the mail about the former president’s sale, and we’ve seen which of the people cared the most,” McCubbin said.

In the 7th, the only outside spending for Rice came from a PAC that attempted to tie Fry to Democratic figures like Nancy Pelosi and President Joe Biden.

Mace also had a heavy hitter by his side: Nikki Haley.

The Haley Effect

The former governor, who is also a resident of Kiawah Island and a 1st District voter, endorsed Mace. Two days later, after Arrington got into the race, Trump lined up against Mace and behind Arrington.

While this dynamic has set up something of a proxy war between Haley and Trump, both of whom are said to have weighed in on the 2024 presidential candidacies, Haley is an influential figure in her own right.

According to a recent Winthrop poll, Haley remains hugely popular among the GOP base in South Carolina, where she enjoys an 82% approval rating among self-identified Republicans. That’s just behind US Senator Tim Scott, who held an 89% approval rating among Republicans in the same poll.

Haley’s backing didn’t just come with an endorsement, it came with a serious investment that topped Trump.

On the eve of Trump’s rally in South Carolina, which took place in the 7th Ward, not the 1st, Haley hosted a fundraiser for Mace in downtown Charleston.

She has also signed fundraising letters, signed emails and raised funds directly for the Mace campaign using her own digital infrastructure. She appeared in two different television commercials for Mace.

“She raised a ton of money for her. She was an enthusiastic surrogate and she also cut effective TV commercials,” Godfrey said. “These are invaluable assets in a tight competitive race, and they can all make a difference.”

Mace’s campaign manager describes Haley’s endorsement another way:

“It was like chess. She took the first step. It’s a gamble, it’s a risk, and you hope it pays off,” McCubbin said. “It was Haley’s bet, and it paid off big.”

Mace won convincingly by a margin of 53% to 45%. In round numbers, that’s a difference of about 6,000 votes.

]]>
3rd Congressional Candidate Byrd: Let’s Overcome Political Polarization | Government and politics https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/3rd-congressional-candidate-byrd-lets-overcome-political-polarization-government-and-politics/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 21:45:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/3rd-congressional-candidate-byrd-lets-overcome-political-polarization-government-and-politics/ Chris Byrd of Toutle, an independent race to represent the 3rd congressional district, decided to throw his name into the candidate pool after being exhausted by his extreme political polarization. “I don’t think it’s beneficial for our future,” he said. The high school social studies teacher said the partisan political environment is detrimental to […]]]>

Chris Byrd of Toutle, an independent race to represent the 3rd congressional district, decided to throw his name into the candidate pool after being exhausted by his extreme political polarization.

“I don’t think it’s beneficial for our future,” he said.

The high school social studies teacher said the partisan political environment is detrimental to the region’s growth and presents an obstacle to addressing its challenges. Byrd takes the position of a mediator seeking to mend the political divide, as he believes the solution to most problems is to unite political parties, although he does not yet know how he will do this.

Byrd called his campaign approach unconventional.

Before tackling issues like inflation and climate change, he wants to change the way policymakers discuss them.

“My goal is to kind of experiment with a social media campaign and see how many people I can reach with my message and see if it takes off,” Byrd said. “I hope to at least make a difference and try to change the conversation.”

People also read…

GOP challengers to Herrera Beutler affirm their positions

The candidate is trying to reach as many people as possible in southwest Washington ahead of the Aug. 2 primary election. He will use social media platforms, such as Twitter and TikTok, and make cold calls to connect with around 500 people a day. until the elections. Meanwhile, Byrd plans to compile a list of voters’ top concerns and then figure out how to address them in a bipartisan way.

Collectively, Byrd’s challengers have raised millions in campaign finance, according to the Federal Election Commission. Byrd wants to squeeze money out of politics completely, going so far as not to hold fundraising events for his campaign.

Compared to other candidates in the race, Byrd doesn’t have much money or public support. However, he throws out a Hail Mary and will be delighted if he influences people with his message.

“I want my own children to know that you can strive for your goals, so I’m going to do my best,” he said. “I have two months to do it.

Avoid political tags

Byrd remembers struggling to breathe when he walked out as smoke from a wildfire engulfed the area. He noted how steadily rising temperatures are hurting key resources, such as fish, in southwest Washington. These climatic events are devastating, the candidate said, and the possibility of them getting worse is frightening.

Despite these concerns, Byrd has been unable to relay state and federal initiatives he supports that would address this underlying problem. Instead, he wants to focus on how to unite opposing viewpoints and avoid getting stuck in a certain position.

Byrd’s neutral approach and attempts to appeal to all political perspectives can also be applied to the discussion of public safety.

“Right now, law enforcement is in an extremely difficult situation in our country. They need to be supported,” he said. “That also includes that other side than the people who, you know, might see the negative side of some of these enforcement issues.”

Lawyer finds Toutle Lake District sexual harassment complaint mishandled

In 2018, an independent investigator found Byrd failed to properly follow district policies and procedures when he was principal of Toutle Lake High School, according to the (Longview) Daily News report. The incident involved members of the school’s basketball team exhibiting sexually graphic and offensive behavior towards the players’ mothers, The Daily News wrote. The investigator found that the complaint had been mishandled.

“At the time, I did what I thought I had to do according to procedure,” Byrd said. “At the end of the day, some things should have been handled differently.”

Editor’s Note: This story is part of a series of candidate profiles for Washington’s 3rd congressional district. Each candidate who agreed to be interviewed will be profiled. Find all the profiles on www.columbian.com/news/tag/3rd-congressional.

]]>
Sam Peters wins Republican primary in Nevada’s 4th congressional district – Ballotpedia News https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/sam-peters-wins-republican-primary-in-nevadas-4th-congressional-district-ballotpedia-news/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 02:03:40 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/sam-peters-wins-republican-primary-in-nevadas-4th-congressional-district-ballotpedia-news/ Sam Peters defeated Annie Black and Chance Bonaventura in the June 14 Republican primary for Nevada’s 4th congressional district. Peters will face incumbent Rep. Steven Horsford (D) in the general election. The Democratic primary was canceled since Horsford was the only candidate standing in the race. Inside the elections and Sabato’s Crystal Ball called the […]]]>

Sam Peters defeated Annie Black and Chance Bonaventura in the June 14 Republican primary for Nevada’s 4th congressional district. Peters will face incumbent Rep. Steven Horsford (D) in the general election. The Democratic primary was canceled since Horsford was the only candidate standing in the race.

Inside the elections and Sabato’s Crystal Ball called the general election Lean Democratic, and The Cook Political Report viewed the race as a draw. According FiveThirtyEightNevada’s 4th had a lean D+5 supporter after the 2020 redistricting round, while the old district had a lean R+1. A partisan lean indicates the difference between how a state or district votes and how the country votes globally.

Black and Peters led the Republican primary field in fundraising, media coverage and endorsements, including an endorsement for Nevada’s two Republican Party candidates.

Peters is a US Air Force veteran and owned a risk management company. In 2020, Peters ran in the Republican primary for US House in Nevada’s 4th and was defeated 35%-28% by Jim Marchant (R). A Peters campaign ad said Peters is “running for Congress to end President Trump’s wall, stop illegal immigration, stand up for our rights, and stand up to socialists.” Two members of the U.S. House Freedom Caucus, Reps. Andy Biggs (R-Arizona) and Paul Gosar (R-Arizona), and former Nevada Gov. Robert List (R) endorsed Peters.

Black is a real estate agent and business owner. She served on the Mesquite City Council from 2018 to 2020 and was elected to the Nevada State Assembly in 2020 to represent Assembly District 19. Black’s campaign website said, ” Biden-Horsford’s economic policies are destroying our state and bankrupting Nevadans. I am running for Congress to revive our economy. Two U.S. House members, Rep. Carol Miller (RW.Va.) and House Republican Conference Speaker Elise Stefanik (RN.Y.), have endorsed Black and the Republican National Committee of Congress has selected Black as an On the Radar contestant.




]]>
Representatives Mace and Rice face tough GOP primaries after challenging Trump | Nevada News https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/representatives-mace-and-rice-face-tough-gop-primaries-after-challenging-trump-nevada-news/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 04:11:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/representatives-mace-and-rice-face-tough-gop-primaries-after-challenging-trump-nevada-news/ By MEG KINNARD, Associated Press CHARLESTON, SC (AP) — Two Republican incumbents of the United States House in South Carolina who drew the ire of former President Donald Trump now face tough primary challenges Tuesday from candidates that he approved. Representatives Nancy Mace and Tom Rice criticized Trump after the Jan. 6 uprising, with Rice […]]]>

By MEG KINNARD, Associated Press

CHARLESTON, SC (AP) — Two Republican incumbents of the United States House in South Carolina who drew the ire of former President Donald Trump now face tough primary challenges Tuesday from candidates that he approved.

Representatives Nancy Mace and Tom Rice criticized Trump after the Jan. 6 uprising, with Rice among 10 House Republicans who crossed party lines to vote to impeach him.

In Nevada, Democratic Rep. Dina Titus is pitted against a progressive, while Republican Rep. Mark Amodei has challenged a son of one of the state’s most famous sports personalities. In Maine, a former Republican congressman is seeking to reclaim his old seat.

In Texas, a special primary election is being held for the remaining months of former Democratic Representative Filemon Vela’s term.

political cartoons

Top congressional races to watch in Tuesday’s primaries in Maine, Nevada, North Dakota, South Carolina and Texas:

CROSSING TRUMP: SOUTH CAROLINA REPUBLICANS FACE CHALLENGES

Five-term congressman Rep. Tom Rice drew half a dozen GOP challengers after his vote to impeach Trump. All cited the vote as a mark of disloyalty to the former president and to Rice’s voters in the 7th Congressional District, who have strongly backed Trump in both of his campaigns. Trump endorsed State Rep. Russell Fry in the race.

Rice, an otherwise consistent supporter of Trump’s policies, backed his vote, acknowledging it could lead to his ousting but saying he was following his conscience.

With a field of seven Republicans, it’s likely no candidate will garner more than 50% of the vote and the primary will head to a runoff on June 28. The Rice District includes the tourist hotspot of Myrtle Beach and a number of inland rural areas.

Taking a somewhat different approach, Representative Nancy Mace sought to atone for Trump’s wrath, filming a video in New York this year outside Trump Tower to remind her constituents that she was one of ” first supporters” of the former president. She worked for his 2016 campaign and had his support in his 2020 run.

In addition to criticizing Trump for the Jan. 6 insurrection, Mace went against the former president’s wishes by voting to certify President Joe Biden’s victory in the 2020 election and to hold Steve Bannon in defiance of the government. Congress for defying a subpoena from the Capitol Insurgency Investigating Committee.

Trump is backing Mace’s opponent, former state Rep. Katie Arrington, who won the GOP nomination for the seat in 2018 by beating incumbent Mark Sanford. She then lost the seat to Joe Cunningham in the general election in the Democrats’ first round of a seat in South Carolina in decades.

Mace, who narrowly defeated Cunningham in 2020, spent one term representing the politically diverse 1st congressional district, which includes Charleston and stretches south to other coastal areas, including Hilton Head Island.

PRIMARY CHALLENGE IN THE SAFEST GOP HOUSE SEAT IN NEVADA

Rep. Mark Amodei faces a primary challenge from a perennial candidate with a famous last name.

Danny Tarkanian, son of legendary University of Nevada, Las Vegas basketball coach Jerry Tarkanian, is trying to bring down the six-term incumbent in the sprawling rural northern district that no Democrat won in 40 years.

Over the years, Tarkanian has launched two Senate campaigns and lost numerous congressional nominations in two other districts. But he created enough of a stir in 2018 when he first challenged Sen. Dean Heller for Trump to intervene to persuade him to give up and run for the House again.

Amodei won a special election for the seat in 2011 after Heller was nominated to serve an unexpired senatorial term. A member of the House Appropriations Committee, Amodei has easily fended off previous primary challenges in the past.

NEVADA DEMOCRAT FACES PRIMARY IN STATE’S BLUEEST DISTRICT

Democratic Rep. Dina Titus, the dean of Nevada’s congressional delegation, faces a progressive challenge from Amy Vilela in the state’s most liberal district.

Vilela, who lost a primary bid in a neighboring district to Rep. Steven Horsford in 2018, was the Nevada co-chair of Bernie Sanders’ 2020 presidential campaign. She was endorsed by Sanders and Rep. Cori Bush of Missouri, a progressive activist who scored a primary upset in 2020 against a 20-year-old Democratic incumbent.

Titus was a top supporter of Biden during his 2020 presidential campaign. She served six terms in the House and chairs a transportation subcommittee.

With one of the most liberal voting records in Congress, Titus has fought his way through major opponents over the years. But she complained about how Nevada redesigned its congressional districts after the 2020 census, safely transforming its Democratic district into one where registered party voters have just a single-digit margin. .

FORMER CONGRESSMAN FROM MAINE BID FOR HOMECOMING

A former congressman wants to regain his old seat in Maine, but first he must fend off a challenge from a fellow Republican in the largely rural and politically mixed district.

Bruce Poliquin represented Maine’s 2nd congressional district from 2015 to 2019 until losing to Democratic Rep. Jared Golden. Golden’s victory over Poliquin was the first congressional election decided by ranked ballot in United States history.

This year, Poliquin hopes to earn a rematch against Golden in one of the most watched races of the 2022 midterms. Caratunk.

SPECIAL PRIMARY ELECTION IN TEXAS TO END CONGRESSMAN’S TERM

Whether Republicans can continue to make gains with Hispanic voters — one of the party’s main goals in 2022 — is being tested in a special election in South Texas.

Four candidates are running to complete the term of former Rep. Filemon Vela, a five-term Democrat who left Congress earlier this year to take a job in the private sector. They include Republican Mayra Flores, who won the GOP nomination for the seat in March and hopes a near-term victory on Tuesday will give her the momentum to overturn the seat in November.

Trump’s big gains along the border with Mexico in 2020 have Democrats on the defensive after decades of one-party control in South Texas. Democratic Rep. Vicente Gonzalez left a neighboring district due to redistricting to run for Vela’s seat and is the party’s nominee for November. But he’s not running to finish Vela’s term, and party leaders have rallied in the special election behind Democrat Dan Sanchez.

The first runner-up would need more than 50% of the vote on Tuesday to win. Otherwise, the top two will qualify for a second round in August.

Associated Press writers Scott Sonner in Reno, Nevada, Paul Weber in Austin, Texas, and Patrick Whittle in Portland, Maine contributed to this report.

Meg Kinnard can be reached at http://twitter.com/MegKinnardAP.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

]]>