Congressional District – Shaughnessy For Congress http://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 00:00:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4.png Congressional District – Shaughnessy For Congress http://shaughnessyforcongress.com/ 32 32 Molinaro candidate for Congress – Daily Freeman https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/molinaro-candidate-for-congress-daily-freeman/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/molinaro-candidate-for-congress-daily-freeman/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 20:57:38 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/molinaro-candidate-for-congress-daily-freeman/ Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro applied for the seat of New York’s 19th Congressional District in the United States House of Representatives in 2022. Molinaro, a Republican who lives in the town of Red Hook, filed a “declaration of candidacy” with the Federal Election Commission on Friday. He did not immediately release a statement on […]]]>

Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro applied for the seat of New York’s 19th Congressional District in the United States House of Representatives in 2022.

Molinaro, a Republican who lives in the town of Red Hook, filed a “declaration of candidacy” with the Federal Election Commission on Friday. He did not immediately release a statement on the running.

Molinaro, 45, is in the middle of his third four-year term as Dutchess County executive. Previously he was a member of the State Assembly, Dutchess County Legislator and, at the age of 19, Mayor of the village of Tivoli in Dutchess County.

In 2018, he ran unsuccessfully against New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. Last May, before Cuomo stepped down amid a sexual harassment scandal, Molinaro announced that he would no longer seek the top position in the state, and he endorsed the Republican representative for the north. State Lee Zeldin for the post.

The seat of New York’s 19th Congressional District is currently held by Rhinebeck Democrat Antonio Delgado, who ousted outgoing Republican Representative John Faso from Kinderhook in 2018 and was re-elected in 2020 against GOP challenger Kyle Van De Water from Millbrook.

Van De Water, who later moved to Hyde Park, announced in July that he planned to run for the seat again in 2022, but dropped out of the race in August. On September 7, he was found dead in a cemetery in the town of Poughkeepsie at the age of 41.

The 19th Congressional District could be reconfigured and renumbered before the 2022 election, as New York State loses a House seat, meaning at least some district lines will need to be redrawn. But because Molinaro and Delgado live in towns neighboring Northern Dutchess, it’s likely that they’ll end up in the same district.

The district currently includes most of Dutchess County; all counties of Ulster, Greene, Columbia, Sullivan, Delaware, Schoharie and Otsego; parts of Rensselaer and Montgomery counties; and a small part of Broome County.


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Nebraska, like Maine, splits Electoral College votes and starts redistribution fight https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/nebraska-like-maine-splits-electoral-college-votes-and-starts-redistribution-fight/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/nebraska-like-maine-splits-electoral-college-votes-and-starts-redistribution-fight/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 12:49:15 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/nebraska-like-maine-splits-electoral-college-votes-and-starts-redistribution-fight/ LINCOLN, Nebraska – A new political map proposed by Republicans in Nebraska would not only make it harder for Democrats to win one of three seats in the State House – it would make it a bit harder for Democrats to win the White House. Nebraska is one of only two states to divide its […]]]>

LINCOLN, Nebraska – A new political map proposed by Republicans in Nebraska would not only make it harder for Democrats to win one of three seats in the State House – it would make it a bit harder for Democrats to win the White House.

Nebraska is one of only two states to divide its constituency votes by congressional district, rather than by a win-win system. This allowed President Joe Biden to claim one of the state’s five electoral votes last year, even though he lost Nebraska by 20 percentage points.

Now, Republicans in the Nebraska Legislature are proposing to divide the 2nd Congressional District, the one Biden won, in their new map. The change would make the swingy neighborhood surrounding Omaha, the state’s largest city, more Republican. It would also make it more difficult for a Democratic presidential candidate to win.

Winning the presidency has not been reduced to a single electoral vote since the early years of the United States. Yet each of the nation’s 538 electoral votes is valuable. That single Electoral College vote – sometimes dubbed the “blue dot” in the state’s Red Sea – was enough to make Omaha a regular stop on the Democratic presidential campaign circuit.

The GOP card was approved in a party line committee vote in the Nebraska Legislature on Thursday and will move to the floor of the one-chamber legislature, which is officially non-partisan, albeit Republican-controlled. Democrats oppose the cards and the GOP does not have enough lawmakers to overcome an obstruction, making the final cards likely to be some kind of compromise.

Critics say the current proposal could effectively overturn Democrat-backed 1991 legislation that split the state’s Electoral College votes. Under the current system, the winner of each of the three constituencies gets an electoral vote. The two additional Electoral College votes that the state obtains, one for each of its senators, go to the general winner of the state.

“There’s no question the Republicans would love to win there, and they’re doing what they think is necessary to do it,” said former State Senator Bob Krist, a Republican turned Democrat who worked with GOP lawmakers during the last redistribution ten years ago.

Republicans say they’re not trying to mess with the Electoral College. But they made no secret of their dissatisfaction with the Nebraska arrangement.

“Democrats knew exactly what they were doing,” said Ryan Hamilton, executive director of the Nebraska Republican Party. “They hid behind this noble populist rhetoric, and it benefited them. The reality is they want this electoral vote, and we want it too. “

Barack Obama visited – and won District 2 – in 2008. Hillary Clinton landed in 2016 but didn’t win. Joe Biden sent staff to Omaha, visited and won the district last year, and the extra vote gave him another path to the 270 votes he needed to become president – if he hadn’t. could not win the good number of other states of the battlefield. It remains a politically competitive area, fairly balanced between the two parties and represented in Congress by a Republican, Don Bacon.

The new map would cut off the western edge of Omaha and place it in the 1st Congressional District, which relies heavily on Republicans as most is rural farmland with several more conservative towns. These voters would be replaced by the suburban and rural areas to the west which are significantly more Republican.

If the Democrats lose their chance at the “blue dot” in Nebraska, it is possible that they will improve their chances of landing another one. The only other state that reliably divides its electoral votes by congressional district is Democratic Maine, whose sprawling 2nd rural congressional district was won by Trump last year.

On Thursday night, Democrats in Maine, who control the state legislature, released a proposal to move the state capital of Augusta and a strongly Democratic town from Hallowell to the 2nd Congressional District. This could make the district a bit more democratic, although both parties were still analyzing the plan.

Despite the partisan overtones, the biggest objections to Nebraska’s Republican plans have come from Omaha residents and supporters who say the GOP shouldn’t divide a city.

“When you see these proposals that divide communities, that divide counties, it’s going to raise a lot of red flags,” said Danielle Conrad of the American Civil Liberties Union of Nebraska.

Notably, the Republican proposal leaves intact the African-American neighborhood of northern Omaha and a strongly Latin part of southern Omaha. But Preston Love, chairman of Black Votes Matter, a group based in northern Omaha, compared the Republican plan to divide the city to a tangible legacy of African-American powerlessness – the highway through northern Omaha. .

“This,” Love said of the proposal to divide his town, “is an electoral highway.”

State Senator Lou Ann Linehan, the sponsor of the Republican proposal, said she was not trying to change the presidential election. The growth of Omaha and its suburbs simply requires the area to be spread over several congressional districts.

The GOP map “does not eliminate a blue dot, nor does it guarantee it,” Linehan said. “The blue dot depends more on the presidential candidates than on the Congress card. “

In a legislative hearing Thursday, residents of Omaha complained about their city’s split. Carmen Bunde, a West Omaha real estate agent whose home would move to the 1st Congressional District as part of the GOP plan, said she sees herself as “a proud Omahan” who wishes to stay in the 2nd. district. Bunde said her sister lives in Wahoo, a small farming town in the 1st District about 30 miles from where she lives, and their lives are very different.

“We don’t have the same school district or the same legislative concerns,” Bunde said. “It doesn’t make sense that we are grouped together. I am a proud Omahan, and Omaha is where I live, play, worship, and work.

Associated Press writer Patrick Whittle contributed from Portland, Maine.


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Redistribution Committee advances congressional map dividing Douglas County | Elections https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/redistribution-committee-advances-congressional-map-dividing-douglas-county-elections/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/redistribution-committee-advances-congressional-map-dividing-douglas-county-elections/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/redistribution-committee-advances-congressional-map-dividing-douglas-county-elections/ Take a look at the main differences in the redistribution proposals for the Omaha Metro Congress districts. OMAHA – Lawmakers at the Nebraska Legislature Constituency Committee voted along party lines to advance a map of the congressional district that divides Douglas County, following a day of public testimony in Omaha where most of the witnesses […]]]>

Take a look at the main differences in the redistribution proposals for the Omaha Metro Congress districts.



OMAHA – Lawmakers at the Nebraska Legislature Constituency Committee voted along party lines to advance a map of the congressional district that divides Douglas County, following a day of public testimony in Omaha where most of the witnesses said they opposed this idea.

The bill, introduced by committee chair Senator Lou Ann Linehan of Elkhorn and other Republican lawmakers, is now before the legislature. The debate between the whole body is expected to begin on Friday. The proposal would need 33 votes to overcome an obstruction, and there are 32 Republicans and 17 Democrats in the officially non-partisan unicameral.

The five Republicans on the committee voted to move the bill forward in an executive session Thursday afternoon. Had the redistribution been done on a typical schedule, Linehan said, the committee would not have taken the vote at the end of a long public hearing. But senators must have something to debate on Capitol Hill Friday morning due to this year’s tight deadline, and the Congress card is going to be “controversial,” she said.

Before the vote, the public weighed in for five hours. Most of the testimony consisted of arguments against splitting Douglas County, the seat of Omaha, as would happen under the proposed proposal. Several witnesses, however, also pleaded for the whole of Sarpy County – and others pleaded to find a way to do both.






A major point of contention is the 2nd Congressional District.


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Independent constituency commission fails to reach consensus, issues competing maps https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/independent-constituency-commission-fails-to-reach-consensus-issues-competing-maps/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/independent-constituency-commission-fails-to-reach-consensus-issues-competing-maps/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 15:07:11 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/independent-constituency-commission-fails-to-reach-consensus-issues-competing-maps/ Map of Congress of Democrats on the left; Congress Republican map on the right. The arrow Map of Congress of Democrats on the left; Congress Republican map on the right. Independent constituency commission The bipartisan state commission charged with redrawing the maps of legislative districts and Congress released two competing draft proposals on Wednesday after […]]]>

Map of Congress of Democrats on the left; Congress Republican map on the right.

The arrow

Map of Congress of Democrats on the left; Congress Republican map on the right.

Independent constituency commission

The bipartisan state commission charged with redrawing the maps of legislative districts and Congress released two competing draft proposals on Wednesday after Democrats and appointed Republicans failed to agree on a set of maps.

The Independent Redistricting Commission’s unanimous decision to release the Dueling Cards for the Assembly, State Senate, and Congressional Districts undermined the commission’s stated goal of eliminating politics in the creation process. redistribution cards, which takes place every ten years after the census.

The result left many concerned that the final project would again be influenced by politics.

“There is great potential that this commission could overthrow a very partisan product,” said Jennifer Williams, deputy director of the New York League of Women Voters.

READ MORE: “Redistricting Means Power”: New Yorkers Have a Say in Deciding Their District Boundaries

The redistribution was left to the state legislature until 2014, when voters overwhelmingly approved the creation of the commission. However, a 2014 referendum provision seen as fail-safe allows the state legislature to completely reject the commission’s cards and create its own cards. If the commission publishes competing final maps again in the coming months, it will allow the state legislature to exploit that security. This would benefit the Democrats who currently control both the State Assembly and Senate.

Drawing the lines of Congress will serve as the main battleground between Democrats and Republicans, as their maps are likely to have a major influence on the 2022 midterm elections. With Democrats controlling the House of Representatives by the narrowest margins, the Democratic-controlled state legislature is likely to approve cards that favor their party in time for mid-terms. A similar move occurs in states with Republican-controlled legislatures, pressuring the New York legislature to accommodate Democrats just as the state is on the verge of losing a seat in Congress in the north of the state.

This pressure is illustrated by the congressional set of competing cards. The proposed Republican card removed a Democratic seat currently held by Representative Antonio Delgado, while Democrats offered to eliminate a Republican seat held by Representative Tom Reed. Meanwhile, the city’s only congressional district in New York City, currently represented by Representative Nicole Malliotakis, has been kept intact in both versions.

People nominated by the Republicans decried the Democrats’ cartographic approach, saying they had misinterpreted the set of constitutional guidelines they had to follow in drawing the maps. The cards should be contiguous, have roughly the same number of people, and avoid dividing marginalized communities of color to avoid deprivation of voters’ right to vote. The idea is to avoid gerrymandering, a process where district lines are manipulated to favor one party over another.

READ MORE: Divided neighborhoods demand more political influence with new redistribution maps

Some Republicans have argued that congressional cards could violate federal law because there are a disproportionate number of people in certain districts, and a signal that any final card could be challenged in court.

“I can’t help but be disappointed and regret that we have not been able, as a committee, to put together a single product,” said Jack Martins, appointed Republican and former senator. state, before approving plans.

But those Democratic nominees stressed that these cards are only drafts that give New Yorkers greater options in deciding which they prefer.

“Everything right now doesn’t have to be perfect,” said Eugene Benger, a Democrat-appointed.

The maps were posted on the commission’s website shortly after the meeting. New Yorkers will be allowed to comment on the proposed cards in a series of hearings starting in October (a full list of dates, times and locations can be found here). Over the summer, the commission held similar listening sessions statewide to solicit comments.

Commissioners had drawn up the plans in a short timeframe, due to a funding delay to convene the expert group, as well as a four-month delay in releasing the census data needed to develop the maps. . The delay gave cartographers just under a month to draw the district boundaries.


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New Hampshire Lawmakers Get Public Opinion on Redistribution | New Hampshire News https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/new-hampshire-lawmakers-get-public-opinion-on-redistribution-new-hampshire-news/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/new-hampshire-lawmakers-get-public-opinion-on-redistribution-new-hampshire-news/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 14:50:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/new-hampshire-lawmakers-get-public-opinion-on-redistribution-new-hampshire-news/ By HOLLY RAMER, Associated Press CONCORD, NH (AP) – Lawmakers tasked with redesigning New Hampshire’s legislative districts will begin to hear from the public on Tuesday. The House Redistribution Committee will hold its first public listening session in Concord. Similar sessions will take place statewide, with meetings scheduled in Dover on September 22 and Manchester […]]]>

By HOLLY RAMER, Associated Press

CONCORD, NH (AP) – Lawmakers tasked with redesigning New Hampshire’s legislative districts will begin to hear from the public on Tuesday.

The House Redistribution Committee will hold its first public listening session in Concord. Similar sessions will take place statewide, with meetings scheduled in Dover on September 22 and Manchester on September 30.

Republicans hold eight of the 15 House committee seats, while the Senate redistribution committee is made up of two Republicans and a Democrat. The Senate panel will initially focus on redesigning the 24 state Senate districts and the five Executive Council districts, while the House will launch plans for the 400-seat House and the two Congressional districts.

Republicans also controlled the Legislature when the current plan was approved in 2012. But the card was vetoed by Democratic Gov. John Lynch, who argued it was unconstitutional because it refused to 62 cities and districts their own seats in the House and that it was separating unnecessarily. municipalities. The legislature overrode the veto, and the state Supreme Court subsequently declared the plan constitutional.

Political cartoons

Republican Gov. Chris Sununu vetoed bills in 2020 and 2019 that would have created an independent redistribution commission, saying it was not necessary because gerrymandering – drawing limits for the benefit of the ruling party – is rare in the state and the current redistribution process was fair. The GOP-led legislature killed similar bills this year.

Although Democrats hold both seats in the United States House, the 1st District seat swung five times in seven election cycles before Democrat Chris Pappas won his first term in 2018. Some Republicans want to use the process of redistribution to increase their chances of regaining the seat, but Sununu recently told New Hampshire Public Radio: “This is really stupid.”

“Constituencies and elections and the public service are won with good candidates. If you don’t have a good candidate, I don’t care how good you are doing the district, ”he said. “I’m just a big believer that it’s just a bunch of political nonsense that really has no place and never really happens.”

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Here’s how Upland and Rancho Cucamonga could gain influence over neighboring forest lands – Daily Bulletin https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/heres-how-upland-and-rancho-cucamonga-could-gain-influence-over-neighboring-forest-lands-daily-bulletin/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/heres-how-upland-and-rancho-cucamonga-could-gain-influence-over-neighboring-forest-lands-daily-bulletin/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 20:21:43 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/heres-how-upland-and-rancho-cucamonga-could-gain-influence-over-neighboring-forest-lands-daily-bulletin/ With the redistribution underway, a push is being made to connect the western part of the San Bernardino National Forest with communities in the adjacent foothills that are forced to deal with overflowing forest issues such as access to trails, forest management. water, forest fires, traffic and vandalism. But making a formal link in Congress […]]]>

With the redistribution underway, a push is being made to connect the western part of the San Bernardino National Forest with communities in the adjacent foothills that are forced to deal with overflowing forest issues such as access to trails, forest management. water, forest fires, traffic and vandalism.

But making a formal link in Congress between the communities of Upland and Rancho Cucamonga with the vast federal forest lands north of their borders is not as easy as tying a knot.

Because the 2020 California Citizens Redistricting Commission must take into account the voting rights of minority communities, keeping districts equal in population and other factors, require that a member of Congress represent the adjacent forest as well as the towns in the foothills. neighbors do not always match.

In fact, as it stands, the congressional districts around the towns in the West Valley are a tangled mishmash, often leaving the mountains – important federal recreational lands used by millions of people – to float. alone.

For example, the San Gabriel Mountains in the San Bernardino National Forest are in the 8th District of Congress, a huge district that stretches all the way to Death Valley and includes Hesperia and Barstow but not Upland and Rancho Cucamonga.

Likewise, Upland, a town of 80,000 people, is divided between the 27th and 31st Congressional Districts, represented respectively by Judy Chu, D-Pasadena and Pete Aguilar, D-Redlands. Rancho Cucamonga, population 176,379, is also located in the Aguilar district. But if either city wants to talk about forestry issues, they should go to Representative Jay Obernolte, R-Big Bear, in the 8th arrondissement.

Upland City Councilor Janice Elliott sees this as a disconnect in representation for the immediate region. Acting as a private citizen, she wrote a letter to the California Citizens Redistricting Commission 2020 requesting that Upland and Rancho Cucamonga be in the same congressional district as the San Gabriels who are found in parts of the Angels and Angels National Forests. San Bernardino.

“These communities in the foothills south of the San Gabriel Mountains share many common traits and a very important relationship with our adjacent San Gabriel Mountains. This makes our cities “communities of interest,” which should be in the same congressional district as the San Bernardino Mountains. So we have a member of Congress who represents our interest in the management and protection of the forest, ”Elliott wrote.

Elliott, who sits on the board of directors of West End Consolidated Water Co. which pumps groundwater to the foothills, says runoff from the forest could affect water quality. In addition, Upland owns 74% of the San Antonio Water Co. and has a vested interest in mountain water runoff, water quality and quantity.

In Cucamonga Canyon, Elliott was part of a Sierra Club clean-up in which old cars were removed from the creek.

“Waste affects the water. All the oil and fuel is dumped in Cucamonga Creek, ”she said in an interview.

She would prefer that the boundary of the 31st District of Aguilar be redrawn to encompass neighboring forest lands. She said Upland and Rancho Cucamonga already have a relationship with Aguilar as he represents residents of both.

“Whoever occupies this office, I would like it to represent that part of the mountains as well,” she said.

Cucamonga Canyon has been closed by the US Forest Service for almost 10 years due to fires and, since it is not a loop, to get people out of the canyon in the event of a forest fire. In addition, when it opened in 2014, thousands of visitors blocked the road and caused parking risks. Access to this canyon is considered by many to be as much a city issue as it is a US Forest Service issue. Having a representative in Congress who knows the cities and this part of the forest could help with access issues, she said.

John Monsen is a Sierra Club member hired as a consultant by a nonprofit called Nature For All to advocate for the redistribution of congressional boundaries in the Angeles and San Bernardino National Forests to include neighboring towns. . He described the formation of the 8th arrondissement in 2011 as a “serious mistake”.

“Congressional District 8 had gone mad,” Monsen said. “The nearest town, regardless of its size, is Hesperia. They have no interest in knowing how (the forest) is managed. The people who care about the way it is run are not in the neighborhood.

Another example of an odd line drawing is Mt. Baldy Village, which is divided between two congressional districts. Two thirds of residents are in the 8th arrondissement and one third in the 27th arrondissement. Upland is a short drive from Mount Baldy.

Upland Mayor Bill Velto has said he will not tell Rancho Cucamonga or Mt. Baldy Village who should represent them in Congress. “I would leave it to them to do it,” he said.

Also, he said, having two or three members of Congress to turn to can be an advantage. He said Obernolte knows forest land because he lives in Big Bear, a mountain community in the San Bernardino National Forest. In his Sept. 6 statement on shutting down US Forest Service forests in the state to prevent fires, Obernolte blamed “poor forest management practices that have left over 80 million acres of overgrown national forests, prone to fires and in urgent need of active resources. management.”


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The Day – Delayed by COVID, Connecticut redistribution accelerates https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/the-day-delayed-by-covid-connecticut-redistribution-accelerates/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/the-day-delayed-by-covid-connecticut-redistribution-accelerates/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 22:02:35 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/the-day-delayed-by-covid-connecticut-redistribution-accelerates/ Connecticut’s legislative redistribution process goes public this week, testing whether the availability of open data and mapping tools can bring public participation in a process long controlled by political insiders. It is easy to calculate the appropriate population levels for the Congressional and General Assembly districts. But adjusting district lines, a task that began late […]]]>

Connecticut’s legislative redistribution process goes public this week, testing whether the availability of open data and mapping tools can bring public participation in a process long controlled by political insiders.

It is easy to calculate the appropriate population levels for the Congressional and General Assembly districts. But adjusting district lines, a task that began late with the arrival of granular data from the pandemic-delayed 2020 census, comes with the complexity of a Rubik’s Cube.

The redistribution has traditionally been done out of the public eye, negotiated by leaders of the Democratic and Republican legislative caucuses sensitive to the wants and needs of incumbents – namely, district cards that will increase the chances of re-election, without inviting to competition.

The availability of free online mapping tools preloaded with census and election data means that for the first time anyone can nominate their own constituencies and submit them to the legislature’s redistribution commission. It also means that the cards can be easily evaluated to determine if they have partisan bias or racial impact.

“I really think we should welcome this level of contribution,” said Rep. Gregg Haddad, D-Mansfield, co-chair of the reassignment committee.

The tools can be found on websites such as Districtr.org, DavesRedistricting.org, and DistrictBuilder.org.

Senatorial Minority Leader Kevin Kelly R-Stratford, the other co-chair, said the mapping available on websites is an opportunity for anyone who has ever thought they could do a better job than lawmakers.

“The flip side is people will see the complexity of the challenge,” he said.

The first of four public hearings on the redistribution takes place at 7 p.m. on Wednesday at the Legislative Office building in Hartford, followed by one at 1 p.m. Thursday at Norwich Town Hall. Two more are scheduled for next week, the last to be conducted via Zoom.

But there will be no proposed maps to comment on, unless they are offered by the public.

The redistribution commission has only met twice, once to organize in April and again on Friday to schedule public hearings. He will not produce a card until he meets his September 15 constitutional deadline and dissolves himself, giving way to a safeguard commission of eight lawmakers to elect a ninth member.

If the committee had produced maps for the United States House, State Senate, and State House districts, they would have been submitted to the Full General Assembly for approval, which requires a two-thirds qualified majority. Anything that the nine-member commission produces will not be subject to a legislative vote.

If the commission cannot agree on new districts by Nov. 30, the task falls to the Connecticut Supreme Court. Ten years ago, the commission agreed to the state’s legislative districts, but the congressional map was finalized by the court.

Connecticut’s overall population barely changed from 2010 to 2020, adding just 31,847 people to a state of 3.6 million. That’s a nine-tenths increase of 1%, the smallest among the 47 states that have seen growth in the past decade.

But the population was hardly static. For example, Stamford grew up and Hartford shrank, a likely gain in political weight for one and a loss for the other. One congressional district needs to grow, another more compact.

“It’s a very difficult process, and there will be winners and losers,” Speaker of the House Matt Ritter, D-Hartford said.

Hartford, the only one of the state’s five largest cities to lose population, now sends six representatives to the state’s House of Representatives. It will be a challenge to attract new districts that can elect more than five.

At the congressional level, the losses in eastern Connecticut and the gains in Fairfield County mean that U.S. Representative Joe Courtney’s sprawling 2nd District must grow even larger, while Representative Jim Himes’ 4th will become more compact.

“There is going to be a clear need to make changes to the maps of Congress to a degree that I don’t think we saw 10 years ago,” said House Minority Leader Vincent J. Candelora , R-North Branford.

Drawing the cards is a legislative function in Connecticut, but Democrats’ dominance over the General Assembly is not an advantage. By constitution, the legislature’s redistribution committee is equally divided, four Democrats and four Republicans. Unsurprisingly, the cards are generally seen as fair to both parties.

PlanScore, a national nonprofit that assesses the fairness of legislative maps, says its measures “do not consistently indicate a bias in favor of either party” in Assembly districts general. He does not offer any opinion on Congress cards in states with fewer than seven seats.

The commission that will succeed the committee should be made up of the two principal officers of each of the four legislative caucuses.

“You have to do it, I think, at the highest level of leadership,” Ritter said. “Probably nothing is more important to your caucus members and their districts than what they look like. “

Candelora, Kelly and their deputies, Rep. Jason Perillo, R-Shelton, and Senator Paul Formica, R-East Lyme, are on the redistribution committee and will be on the commission.

Ritter and House Majority Leader Jason Rojas, D-East Hartford, will be on the committee. Pro Senate Speaker Tem Martin M. Looney, D-New Haven, declined to say whether he and Senate Majority Leader Bob Duff, D-Norwalk, will represent Senate Democrats until he consults the caucus.

The redistribution in Connecticut begins with three simple calculations: Divide the population of 3,605,944 by 5, 36, and 151. These are the number of Congressional, State Senate, and State House districts.

Ideal neighborhood populations are: US House, 721,188; State Senate, 100 165; and State House, 23,880.

The two congressional districts furthest from the 721,188 ideal are the 2nd, 699,901 residents and the 4th, 746,816 residents. The other three are closer: 1st, 717,654; 3rd, 715,360; and 5th, 726,213.

There will be an adjustment of the data by the Office of State Policy and Management due to a state law that allocates the Connecticut inmate population to their home communities for the purpose of plotting district boundaries.

“This is the last piece of the data puzzle,” Kelly said.

Redistribution is a zero-sum puzzle, where changes in one district spill over into the others.

Almost 40% of the overall population growth has occurred in Stamford, the second largest city in the state with a population of 135,470. As a result, the districts represented by Rep. David Michel and Senator Patricia Billie Miller, both Democrats from Stamford, must become more compact.

The 146th District of the House of Michael now has a population of 32,900, the largest imbalance of any General Assembly District.

Stamford’s population growth will add to the town’s case for a second state senate seat. By combining portions of Bridgeport, New Haven and Hartford with suburbs, these cities now elect two state senators each. Stamford is bigger than New Haven and Hartford, but there is only one senator.

Geography is not on Stamford’s side. Bordered by Long Island Sound on one side and New York on the other, there is little flexibility in drawing the Senate districts around Stamford. The part of Stamford not represented by Miller is in a district dominated by voters in Greenwich, and that seat was recently reclaimed by Republicans in a special election.

The Connecticut Congress card has its own challenges.

Three of the five districts have a geographic sense, but the 5th District of Western Connecticut looks like a creature that has invaded the 1st District of Greater Hartford, traversing the Farmington Valley to the West Hartford border.

The border is the consequence of the loss of a seat in the House of the United States by Connecticut after the census of 2000. It was designed to serve the interests of two incumbents placed in the 5th: Democrat James Maloney of Danbury and Republican Nancy Johnson of New Britain. It was designed to provide a level playing field and remains competitive.

“I think most people would agree that these neighborhoods are a little weird,” Candelora said. “We know historically why they came into being. As long as we can make the districts more representative with logical connectivity, I think we should try to do so. “

Haddad warns that any partisan benefits offered by card revisions may be fleeting.

He notes that three of the five congressional seats were won by Republicans in 2002 and 2004. Courtney and Chris Murphy dethroned Republicans in 2006 in the 2nd and 5th, which remain the most competitive by several measures. Himes toppled a Republican in 2008 in the 4th, a former GOP redoubt that now leans Democrat.

Ten years ago, Republicans came up with a map that made no sense: it made the 5th District border more rational, but it would also have moved Democratic Bridgeport, the state’s largest city, from the 4th to the 3rd – maturing the 4th for a GOP comeback. The court rejected it.

Ritter said the goal this year is for the commission to complete all three maps without court intervention.

“I don’t think anyone thinks that we should ever refer this authority to a judicial branch,” he said. “It’s our job to do it, and I think we plan to do it and get it done on time. “

Mark Pazniokas is a reporter for The Connecticut Mirror (www.ctmirror.org). Copyright 2021 © The Mirror of Connecticut.

mpazniokas@ctmirror.org


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Oregon begins to fight for new congressional district | Govt. & Politics https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/oregon-begins-to-fight-for-new-congressional-district-govt-politics/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/oregon-begins-to-fight-for-new-congressional-district-govt-politics/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 17:54:11 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/oregon-begins-to-fight-for-new-congressional-district-govt-politics/ The Republican map constricts District 3 even closer to the river that marks the Washington state border, to allow the new District 6 to fit into the electoral boundaries puzzle. In a normal redistribution year, the redistribution process would probably have been completed by then. But the coronavirus pandemic has delayed the release of the […]]]>

The Republican map constricts District 3 even closer to the river that marks the Washington state border, to allow the new District 6 to fit into the electoral boundaries puzzle.

In a normal redistribution year, the redistribution process would probably have been completed by then. But the coronavirus pandemic has delayed the release of the US Census Bureau data needed to draw new maps. The slicing data, taken from the 2020 census, was released last month – four months later than expected.

Redistribution numbers states use to redraw legislative and congressional constituencies show where White, Asian, Black and Hispanic communities have grown over the past decade.

Steady population growth – driven by newcomers from other states – gives Oregon greater national political clout. Figures from the US Census Bureau released in April showed that the state’s population had grown 10% over the past decade. As a result, Oregon gained an additional congressional district for the first time in 40 years.

For state legislative districts, there is a set number of districts, so lawmakers can only move boundary lines and lawmaker districts must be equal in population. Districts of Congress are added and subtracted from states based on population and must also be equal in population.

The state’s Legislative Democrats, who overwhelmingly control the legislature, agreed to forgo an advantage in redesigning the state’s political constituencies for the next 10 years in exchange for a Republican pledge to stop blocking legislation in the state. state legislature with delay tactics.


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Former congressional candidate vying for Kansas treasurer https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/former-congressional-candidate-vying-for-kansas-treasurer/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/former-congressional-candidate-vying-for-kansas-treasurer/#respond Tue, 31 Aug 2021 23:39:00 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/former-congressional-candidate-vying-for-kansas-treasurer/ Sara Hart Weir, former president of the National Down Syndrome Society, speaks during the Republican Candidates Debate for Kansas’ 3rd Congressional District on Tuesday evening, July 14, 2020. Shelly yang syang@kcstar.com TOPEKA, Kan. A former executive with an advocacy group for people with Down syndrome has launched a campaign for the treasurer of the state […]]]>

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Sara Hart Weir, former president of the National Down Syndrome Society, speaks during the Republican Candidates Debate for Kansas’ 3rd Congressional District on Tuesday evening, July 14, 2020.

syang@kcstar.com

A former executive with an advocacy group for people with Down syndrome has launched a campaign for the treasurer of the state of Kansas.

Sara Hart Weir said in an email to supporters on Monday that she planned to take a “conservative and alien approach to problem solving.”

Weir joins State Senator Caryn Tyson of Parker, State Representative Steven Johnson of Assaria and Michael Austin, a former economic adviser to former Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback, in seeking the Republican nomination for the treasurer position. The primary takes place in August 2022.

The incumbent is Democrat Lynn Rogers, who was Lieutenant Governor until Governor Laura Kelly appointed him in December to fill the vacant position created when Treasurer Jake LaTurner was elected to Congress.

Weir served as President and CEO of the National Down Syndrome Society for over four years before launching a campaign in 2019 for the Kansas City area congressional seat held by Democrat Sharice Davids. She lost the primary to Amanda Adkins, a former executive at medical information technology company Cerner Corp.

In his campaign ad for state treasurer, Weir touted his work in 2014 on bipartisan legislation that created savings accounts with tax benefits for people with disabilities and their families.


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Former Congressman Joseph P. Kennedy II condemns parole recommendation for Sirhan B. Sirhan https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/former-congressman-joseph-p-kennedy-ii-condemns-parole-recommendation-for-sirhan-b-sirhan/ https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/former-congressman-joseph-p-kennedy-ii-condemns-parole-recommendation-for-sirhan-b-sirhan/#respond Mon, 30 Aug 2021 01:20:12 +0000 https://shaughnessyforcongress.com/former-congressman-joseph-p-kennedy-ii-condemns-parole-recommendation-for-sirhan-b-sirhan/ “The prisoner killed my father because of his support for Israel. The man was tried, convicted and sentenced to death, ”Kennedy continued. “Yet he can now walk freely, no doubt to the cheers of those who share his point of view. Make no mistake, the prisoner’s release will be celebrated by those who believe that […]]]>

“The prisoner killed my father because of his support for Israel. The man was tried, convicted and sentenced to death, ”Kennedy continued. “Yet he can now walk freely, no doubt to the cheers of those who share his point of view. Make no mistake, the prisoner’s release will be celebrated by those who believe that political disagreements can be resolved with a gun.

Kennedy, the eldest son of Robert and Ethel Kennedy, is a six-term former congressman from the state’s eighth congressional district. He is one of the couple’s 10 children, eight of whom are alive.

His comments came two days after he joined five siblings in a statement condemning Friday’s recommendation by the two California parole boards to release the killer who shot Robert F. Kennedy after midnight on June 5, 1968, at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles when the New York senator was seeking the Democratic presidential nomination. Kennedy was gunned down as he walked through the hotel pantry after a victory speech after winning the Democratic primary in California.

He died the next day.

In their statement released Friday, the six Kennedy children vowed to challenge the parole recommendation “every step of the way.” On Saturday, Maxwell T. Kennedy, one of six siblings who signed the statement, published an op-ed in the Los Angeles Times calling “the mere thought” of Sirhan’s release “sickening.”

Five other people around Kennedy were also shot dead, but they all survived.

His death came less than five years after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, one of his brothers, on November 22, 1963 in Dallas.

Sirhan, 77, is serving a life sentence in a California state prison. He has already been denied parole 15 times.

In 1972, Sirhan’s death sentence was commuted to life in prison after California abolished the death penalty.

“My mother, Ethel Kennedy, and my uncle, Senator Edward M. Kennedy, have called for his death sentence to be reduced to life imprisonment as a sign of mercy. He received this mercy, ”Kennedy wrote. “No one should have the right to alter the lesser sentence requested by the person most affected by my father’s death – his wife, whose last child would never know a father’s touch. Nothing written, said or done will ever change this reality.

Douglas Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy Jr., two of the children of the late senators, supported the decision to release Sirhan.

“I am overwhelmed just being able to see Mr. Sirhan face to face,” said Douglas Kennedy during Friday’s virtual parole panel meeting, according to the Associated Press. “I have lived my life both in fear of him and his name in one way or another. And I am grateful today to see him as a human being worthy of compassion and love.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. also attended the virtual hearing but did not speak. He submitted a letter supporting Sirhan’s parole.

A spokesperson for Joseph P. Kennedy II said that Ethel Kennedy was not commenting on her husband’s death. Former Congressman Joseph P. Kennedy III declined to comment on Sunday night’s parole recommendation.

The parole board committee’s decision is subject to a 120-day review by board legal staff, during which the case may be referred to the full board for further assessment before it is processed. a final judgment is rendered.

Joseph Kennedy II does not name any of his siblings in his statement. He appeals directly to the Full Parole Board and, if necessary, California Governor Gavin Newsom, to overturn the decision.

“I hope the Full Parole Board will overturn the decision during the current review period and that the Governor of California, if faced with the choice to release him, will keep him in jail to serve his sentence.” life imprisonment.

“The murderer of anyone who runs for or holds public office because of his political position must know that he will spend a minimum of life in prison without parole,” Kennedy said.

Kennedy pointed out that he and his family are still mourning the loss of his 42-year-old father.

“We miss him every moment of every day and we struggle to understand why the prisoner should be able to enjoy the golden years of his life when he so viciously stole them from our father. There is no justice in this, ”Kennedy said in the statement.

Globe Wires Services and New York Times material used in this article.


Kathy McCabe can be reached at Katherine.McCabe@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @GlobeKMcCabe.



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